NASAA Banner Image

Federal Updates

NASAA provides national representation for state arts agencies, ensuring that their policy and resource interests have a persuasive voice in Washington. Federal updates, alerts and issue briefs keep NASAA members up to date and inform their ongoing contacts with in Congress. To subscribe to NASAA Legislative Alerts, contact Communications Manager Sue Struve.

2017

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 8044
    [post_author] => 3
    [post_date] => 2017-12-08 19:24:37
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-12-08 19:24:37
    [post_content] => December 8, 2017
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel

With the deadline for federal funding set to expire today, the House and Senate last night reached an agreement on a short-term continuing resolution that keeps the government operating at current levels until December 22. As a result, the National Endowment for the Arts will continue to be funded at its existing level of $150 million.

Congress now has an additional two weeks to try to reach an agreement on a longer-term spending package. Congress can choose to pass another continuing resolution should such an agreement prove elusive.

NASAA will continue to monitor this situation and keep you apprised of any developments.
    [post_title] => Congress Approves Short-Term CR, Appropriations Negotiations Continue
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => congress-approves-short-term-cr-appropriations-negotiations-continue
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-12-08 19:26:33
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-12-08 19:26:33
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://nasaa-arts.org/?post_type=legislative_update&p=8044
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Congress Approves Short-Term CR, Appropriations Negotiations Continue

Congress Approves Short-Term CR, Appropriations Negotiations Continue
December 8, 2017

Congress Approves Short-Term CR, Appropriations Negotiations Continue

December 8, 2017 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel With the deadline for federal funding set to expire today, the House and Senate last night reached an agreement on a short-term continuing resolution that keeps the government operating at current levels until December 22. As a result, the National Endowment for the Arts will continue to…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 7887
    [post_author] => 3
    [post_date] => 2017-11-28 19:29:19
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-11-28 19:29:19
    [post_content] => November 20, 2017
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel

This afternoon the Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee released a draft bill containing a proposed budget for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for fiscal year 2018. The bill recommends $150 million for the NEA, an amount matching the agency's current funding levels. Today's Senate bill recommends a higher funding amount for the NEA than did a bill passed by the House in September, which proposed $145 million for the NEA, a $5 million reduction from current levels.

A timetable for next steps has not yet been set. Congress is out of session for the Thanksgiving holiday. When the Senate returns next week, all energy will likely be focused on tax reform legislation which will be on the floor for debate. While the Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee could hold hearings next week, they have not yet scheduled a meeting to do so.

With many members of Congress and Capitol Hill staff already away for the break, we suggest the following action steps: if you are represented by a member of the subcommittee, please contact your Senator's office next week (preferably Monday). Please make the following points:
  • Thank your Senator for the subcommittee's support for the NEA;
  • Reference the federal-state partnership, which sends funding directly to your state;
  • Use the opportunity to highlight a program or event funded by your state arts agency as an example of the value derived from federal investment in the arts.
While the timing and next steps are not entirely clear, we expect to learn more soon. Federal funding for fiscal year 2018 is set to expire on December 8th, so Congress will need to either move quickly or pass another short-term Continuing Resolution to keep government agencies operating. NASAA will keep you updated and will advise you of next steps. [post_title] => Senate Subcommittee Recommends $150 Million for NEA [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => senate-subcommittee-recommends-150-million-nea [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-11-28 19:29:19 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-28 19:29:19 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nasaa-arts.org/?post_type=legislative_update&p=7887 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Senate Subcommittee Recommends $150 Million for NEA

Senate Subcommittee Recommends $150 Million for NEA
November 20, 2017

Senate Subcommittee Recommends $150 Million for NEA

November 20, 2017 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel This afternoon the Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee released a draft bill containing a proposed budget for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for fiscal year 2018. The bill recommends $150 million for the NEA, an amount matching the agency’s current funding levels. Today’s Senate bill recommends a higher…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 7563
    [post_author] => 3
    [post_date] => 2017-09-14 21:08:10
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-14 21:08:10
    [post_content] => September 14, 2017
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel

This afternoon, the House of Representatives approved legislation funding the federal government for fiscal year 2018. That legislation, which passed by a vote of 211-198, would fund the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $145 million, a $5 million reduction from its current level.

The House having completed its work, attention now turns to the Senate, which has yet to release a draft proposal of the NEA's budget for the next fiscal year. We expect that to happen soon, and NASAA will keep you apprised as this situation develops to let you know when it would be best to contact your senators on the agency's behalf.

With Congress having passed a continuing resolution to fund the federal government at current levels until December 8, we do not expect it to complete its work on the FY2018 budget until that date approaches.
    [post_title] => House Passes FY2018 Funding Bill
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-passes-fy2018-funding-bill
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-09-14 21:13:53
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-14 21:13:53
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://nasaa-arts.org/?post_type=legislative_update&p=7563
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Passes FY2018 Funding Bill

House Passes FY2018 Funding Bill
September 14, 2017

House Passes FY2018 Funding Bill

September 14, 2017 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel This afternoon, the House of Representatives approved legislation funding the federal government for fiscal year 2018. That legislation, which passed by a vote of 211-198, would fund the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $145 million, a $5 million reduction from its current level. The House…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 7537
    [post_author] => 3
    [post_date] => 2017-09-07 20:08:36
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-07 20:08:36
    [post_content] => The House and Senate returned from the August recess to a full plate of legislative must-dos. At the forefront, of course, was passing legislation to fund the recovery effort from Hurricane Harvey. Also pressing were legislation funding the federal government (with current allocations set to expire at the end of the month) and a bill to raise the federal government's debt limit (which had to happen before September 30 as well).

While most expected negotiations to be intense and up-to-the-last-minute, President Trump and congressional leaders met on September 6 and unexpectedly emerged with the contours of a deal, which came to fruition. At publication, President Trump was expected to sign legislation providing $8 billion to support the hurricane recovery, a three-month approval for the Treasury Department to increase its debt limit and a three-month continuing resolution that funds all government agencies at their current levels.

What this means for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in the short term is good news. Although funding for the agency has not passed in either chamber yet, the House of Representatives Appropriations Committee approved legislation that would reduce its funding by $5 million (from $150 million to $145 million). However, by passing a three-month continuing resolution, the NEA will be able to continue operating at its current funding level until December 8, rather than having to absorb the House's proposed cut.

What will happen after December 8 is unclear. In terms of the process, the House of Representatives could hold a vote on the Interior Appropriations bill (which includes the NEA's budget) next week; the Senate Interior Appropriations bill is expected to be released next week as well. It is our hope that the Senate committee, which has heard from a significant number of state arts agencies about how the House's proposal would be negatively impactful, will consider level funding or a small reduction. When that bill is introduced, NASAA will be in touch with an alert to inform you of their proposal and how we can best influence the process moving forward.

As the events of this week demonstrate, policy continues to move in unexpected ways. What continues to remain constant, however, is strong bipartisan support for the National Endowment for the Arts and the federal-state partnership.
    [post_title] => Congress Agrees on Spending Plan
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => congress-agrees-on-spending-plan
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-09-08 19:04:37
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-08 19:04:37
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 7519
    [guid] => https://nasaa-arts.org/?post_type=newsletter&p=7537
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => newsletter
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Congress Agrees on Spending Plan

Congress Agrees on Spending Plan
September 7, 2017

Congress Agrees on Spending Plan

The House and Senate returned from the August recess to a full plate of legislative must-dos. At the forefront, of course, was passing legislation to fund the recovery effort from Hurricane Harvey. Also pressing were legislation funding the federal government (with current allocations set to expire at the end of the month) and a bill…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 7416
    [post_author] => 3
    [post_date] => 2017-08-08 14:25:13
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-08 14:25:13
    [post_content] => This week marks the beginning of August recess, traditionally a slow period in Washington, when Congress is out of session and members of Congress and staff return to their home districts. In a year of many unusual twists and turns, however, next month will be a little different than the norm. Although Congress has adjourned until after Labor Day, the appropriations process is so far behind schedule (the Senate Appropriations Committee has not even released its draft bill) that, when they return, members from both parties will have to work at a feverish pace to conclude the process before the end of the fiscal year (September 30).

What this means is that we are at a critical point in the appropriations process. After President Trump called for the elimination of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in his budget request to Congress in the spring, last month the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee (which has jurisdiction over the NEA's budget), considered and passed the agency's budget for fiscal year 2018. That legislation funds the agency at $145 million, a decrease of $5 million from its current level. Any reduction in funding to the NEA is significant and cannot be overlooked, but neither should the leadership House Republicans took in passing a bill with only a modest cut in funding. Historically, when the same party controls both the White House and Congress, the legislative branch has taken the President's lead in shaping the budget, particularly in the first year of a new administration (when the President's popularity is highest).

The House Committee's approval of a budget for the NEA at $145 million last month is important because it not only sends a strong signal that Congress supports the agency's existence, but it also creates an opportunity for the Senate to increase funding. As you know, NASAA and other arts organizations joined forces this spring in asking Congress to fund the agency at $155 million. While that figure may not be attainable given the current pressures facing Congress, it is our hope that it will give Senate Republicans the space to increase funding for the agency above the House's $145 million figure.

Further complicating matters is that current funding for the federal government expires on September 30. As a result, negotiations between the President, the House and the Senate will likely come down to the wire, and it is certainly possible that Congress could pass a continuing resolution funding the federal agency at current levels for part or all of FY2018.

Regardless of which legislative scenario unfolds, continued advocacy will be needed if the NEA is to survive its most serious threat since the mid-1990s. We've made tremendous progress so far, thanks to the committed, bipartisan efforts made by advocates across the country to empower our congressional champions in the House and Senate who stood up for the NEA and must continue to do so moving forward. NASAA is monitoring this situation closely, and will be in touch with talking points when the timing is right for further outreach to key members in the Senate. In the meantime, I want to sincerely thank all of you for your constant attention over the past eight months. I have no doubt it has made all the difference. Let's keep up the great work to ensure the arts continue to benefit Americans across the nation.
    [post_title] => NEA Budget Approved in Committee, Awaits Further Action
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => nea-budget-approved-committee-awaits-action
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-11-14 15:15:23
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-11-14 15:15:23
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 7404
    [guid] => https://nasaa-arts.org/?post_type=newsletter&p=7416
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => newsletter
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
NEA Budget Approved in Committee, Awaits Further Action

NEA Budget Approved in Committee, Awaits Further Action
August 8, 2017

NEA Budget Approved in Committee, Awaits Further Action

This week marks the beginning of August recess, traditionally a slow period in Washington, when Congress is out of session and members of Congress and staff return to their home districts. In a year of many unusual twists and turns, however, next month will be a little different than the norm. Although Congress has adjourned…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 7153
    [post_author] => 3
    [post_date] => 2017-07-19 18:44:38
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-19 18:44:38
    [post_content] => July 19, 2017
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel

Yesterday, the House Appropriations Committee approved its version of the fiscal year 2018 budget for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $145 million. The legislation now awaits consideration on the floor of the House of Representatives, which could come any time between now and September 30 (when current funding expires). While amendments to the legislation during floor debate are possible, it is likely that House leadership will not permit such activity in order to maintain the delicate balance the bill has thus far struck to win support of the Republican caucus.

What this means is that our best opportunity to increase funding for the NEA for FY2018 is in the Senate, where we await release of its draft proposal. Therefore, if you are represented by a senator on the Interior Appropriations Subcommittee (which has jurisdiction over the NEA's budget) and have not done so already, please contact their office (list below) and make the following points:
  • Urge the senator to oppose the President's proposal to eliminate the NEA and ask that the agency be funded at $155 million, particularly if you think the member would be willing to entertain an increase in the current political environment. At the very least, urge the member to support the NEA's current funding level of $150 million.
  • Request continued support for the federal-state partnership that directs 40% of the NEA's grant dollars to state and regional arts organizations.
  • To support your request for an increase in funding in this difficult budget environment, discuss an interesting development or program at your agency and invite the senator and staff to participate when they are home.
Again, we at NASAA sincerely appreciate your attention and efforts to support the NEA at this critical time. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact me. Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee Republicans Democrats [post_title] => House Committee Advances NEA Budget [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => house-committee-advances-nea-budget [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-14 21:11:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-14 21:11:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nasaa-arts.org/?post_type=legislative_update&p=7153 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
House Committee Advances NEA Budget

House Committee Advances NEA Budget
July 19, 2017

House Committee Advances NEA Budget

July 19, 2017 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Yesterday, the House Appropriations Committee approved its version of the fiscal year 2018 budget for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $145 million. The legislation now awaits consideration on the floor of the House of Representatives, which could come any time between now and September…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 7130
    [post_author] => 3
    [post_date] => 2017-07-12 12:02:13
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-07-12 12:02:13
    [post_content] => July 11, 2017
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel

This afternoon, the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee released its draft budget for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for fiscal year 2018. In its bill, the committee proposes funding the agency at $145 million, a reduction of $5 million from the agency's current funding level. While this level is not ideal (NASAA and other arts organizations were seeking an increase to $155 million), it is significant that the committee did not endorse the President's request for elimination of the agency or propose a substantial cut in funding.

With the draft of the bill released, the committee plans to hold a hearing tomorrow, July 12, at 3:00 p.m. Eastern, to mark up the legislation. It is at that time that the committee may consider an amendment to adjust the NEA's funding level.

If you are represented by a member of the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee, I urge you to contact their office and make the following points:
  • Thank the committee for rejecting the President's proposal to eliminate the National Endowment for the Arts.
  • Urge the member to support (at least) the NEA's current funding level of $150 million. (Acknowledge the arts community's $155 million request if you think the member would be willing to entertain an increase in this political environment.)
  • Urge that the committee continue to support the federal-state partnership that allocates 40% of all NEA grant funds directly to state and regional arts organizations.
  • Try to contextualize the proposed cut to the NEA by highlighting some of the recent projects and events you've undertaken at your state arts agency.
NASAA appreciates your willingness to contact members of Congress during this important time. We will continue to keep you updated as events unfold. Below is the list of members of the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee: Republicans Ken Calvert, California, Chairman Mike Simpson, Idaho Tom Cole, Oklahoma David Joyce, Ohio Chris Stewart, Utah, Vice Chair Mark Amodei, Nevada Evan Jenkins, West Virginia Democrats Betty McCollum, Minnesota, Ranking Member Chellie Pingree, Maine Derek Kilmer, Washington Marcy Kaptur, Ohio [post_title] => House Proposes NEA Funding Reduction [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => house-proposes-nea-funding-reduction [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-22 15:53:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-22 15:53:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://nasaa-arts.org/?post_type=legislative_update&p=7130 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
House Proposes NEA Funding Reduction

House Proposes NEA Funding Reduction
July 11, 2017

House Proposes NEA Funding Reduction

July 11, 2017 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel This afternoon, the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee released its draft budget for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for fiscal year 2018. In its bill, the committee proposes funding the agency at $145 million, a reduction of $5 million from the agency’s current funding level. While…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 6823
    [post_author] => 3
    [post_date] => 2017-06-16 14:00:02
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-16 14:00:02
    [post_content] => Last month, President Trump released his full fiscal year 2018 budget request to Congress. That document calls for significant increases in spending for the departments of Defense (more than $50 billion) and Homeland Security (more than $3 billion). To offset these increases, some agencies would experience substantial reductions in funding (the Department of Education would see a $9 million cut, while the Environmental Protection Agency would experience a 31.4% reduction of its current budget), and others, like the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), would be eliminated.

News of the President's recommendation, while not surprising, is both disappointing and concerning. There are, however, several important factors to consider. First, the President's request is not a binding document. Rather, it is treated by Congress as an expression of the executive branch's policy priorities. Historically, even when Congress is controlled by the same party as the President's, the legislature has viewed the President's request as a wish list from which it picks and chooses policies to support.

Despite this being the first year of the Trump presidency, Congress is expected to once again demonstrate its independent authority over this process. In fact, in the days immediately following the release of the President's budget, several influential Republicans in Congress spoke publicly about it being "unrealistic." While we will know more in the coming weeks when the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee (which has jurisdiction over the NEA's budget) releases its FY2018 bill, it appears that support in Congress for eliminating the NEA is severely limited. Comments made both publicly and privately by senior members of Congress indicate that the days are long gone when the agency was viewed as a lightning rod or as divisive; today, the NEA is largely viewed by congressmen and senators of both parties as an efficient agency that supports states, economic development and communities throughout the country.

One need look no further than the appropriations bill for the remainder of FY2017, which passed overwhelmingly in Congress and which was signed by President Trump in early May, to appreciate the strong support for the NEA. In that bill, Congress "commended" the agency for its programs providing arts therapy to veterans and their families and expressed "support" for the federal-state partnership that directs 40% of grant dollars to state arts agencies, as well as increasing funding for the agency by $2 million.

The fact that Congress was willing to express such strong support for the agency last month, despite the fact that it was aware that the President was seeking a cut of $15 million for the agency in FY2017 and outright elimination in FY2018, makes clear that Congress is willing to support the agency regardless of pressure from the Trump administration. To ensure that this support is able to continue, we as arts advocates must continue to be vigilant and to communicate regularly with our House and Senate members about why investing in the National Endowment for the Arts must continue.

We expect the House Interior Appropriations Committee to release its first draft of the NEA's budget for FY2018 in the next few weeks. When it does, I will be in touch immediately with information on what that bill entails as well as how best to respond. As we saw last month, there are many members of Congress on both sides of the aisle working to protect the NEA's interests. It is therefore going to be incumbent on all of us to make sure that every member understands the value and positive impact that will result from continued federal support for the arts.
    [post_title] => Congress Ramps Up Budget Process
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => legislative-update
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-06-21 14:20:04
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-21 14:20:04
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 6804
    [guid] => https://nasaa-arts.org/?post_type=newsletter&p=6823
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => newsletter
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Congress Ramps Up Budget Process

Congress Ramps Up Budget Process
June 16, 2017

Congress Ramps Up Budget Process

Last month, President Trump released his full fiscal year 2018 budget request to Congress. That document calls for significant increases in spending for the departments of Defense (more than $50 billion) and Homeland Security (more than $3 billion). To offset these increases, some agencies would experience substantial reductions in funding (the Department of Education would…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 6677
    [post_author] => 3
    [post_date] => 2017-06-06 17:17:39
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-06 17:17:39
    [post_content] => 
    [post_title] => NASAA Testimony Urges Congress to Fund NEA
    [post_excerpt] => In written testimony sent to the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, NASAA urges Congress to appropriate $155 million to the National Endowment for the Arts for federal FY2018.
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => nasaa-congressional-testimony-may-24-2017
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-06-06 17:59:59
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-06 17:59:59
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://nasaa-arts.org/?post_type=legislative_update&p=6677
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
NASAA Testimony Urges Congress to Fund NEA

NASAA Testimony Urges Congress to Fund NEA
May 24, 2017

NASAA Testimony Urges Congress to Fund NEA

In written testimony sent to the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, NASAA urges Congress to appropriate $155 million to the National Endowment for the Arts for federal FY2018.

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 5369
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2017-05-10 03:38:12
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-10 03:38:12
    [post_content] => 
May 5, 2017
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 17:05

Today President Trump signed into law the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017, which NASAA told you about on Monday. This budget includes funding the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $149.8 million, a $2 million increase from the previous level, through September 30.

This is great news for arts advocates—but we must continue our bipartisan efforts to secure NEA funding for FY2018. Please see NASAA's Advocacy Tools for compelling arguments and actions to support the NEA and its work.

[post_title] => FY2017 Funding Secured, with $2 Million NEA Increase [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => fy2017-funding-secured-2-million-nea-increase [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-03 18:55:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-03 18:55:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=5369 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
FY2017 Funding Secured, with $2 Million NEA Increase

FY2017 Funding Secured, with $2 Million NEA Increase
May 5, 2017

FY2017 Funding Secured, with $2 Million NEA Increase

May 5, 2017 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 17:05 Today President Trump signed into law the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017, which NASAA told you about on Monday. This budget includes funding the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $149.8 million, a $2 million increase from the previous level, through September 30. This is great news for…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 5370
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2017-05-01 03:37:58
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-01 03:37:58
    [post_content] => May 1, 2017
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 17:04

After Friday's short-term extension to allow for further negotiations, congressional leaders announced that they have reached an agreement on a spending package to fund the federal government through the end of September (the remainder of fiscal year 2017). This agreement would avert a government shutdown later this week.

The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017, funds the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $149.8 million, an increase over the agency's current funding level of $148 million. The spending directives accompanying the bill affirm the federal-state partnership allocating 40% of the NEA's grant funding to state and regional arts agencies. The legislation commends the NEA for its work with active-duty military populations and supports the expansion of its healing arts program to additional clinical care sites. As in the past, Congress urges state arts agencies to explore art therapy programs that support service members and their families.

The House and Senate are expected to vote on the legislation this week, before the current continuing resolution expires.

When work concludes on the funding bill for FY2017, Congress is expected to begin working on an aggressive schedule on appropriations legislation for FY2018. NASAA will keep you apprised of that work and of opportunities to urge support for the arts endowment.
    [post_title] => FY2017 Funding Agreement Announced
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => fy2017-funding-agreement-announced
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-10-03 18:48:34
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-03 18:48:34
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=5370
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
FY2017 Funding Agreement Announced

FY2017 Funding Agreement Announced
May 1, 2017

FY2017 Funding Agreement Announced

May 1, 2017 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 17:04 After Friday’s short-term extension to allow for further negotiations, congressional leaders announced that they have reached an agreement on a spending package to fund the federal government through the end of September (the remainder of fiscal year 2017). This agreement would avert a government shutdown later this week.…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 4973
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2017-05-01 18:28:49
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-01 18:28:49
    [post_content] => April 28, 2017
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel

With funding for the federal government set to expire at midnight, Congress quickly passed a short-term spending agreement today to keep the government open for another week. Negotiations on a larger funding bill for the remainder of the fiscal year are progressing, but congressional leadership and the White House ultimately agreed that a short-term continuing resolution was necessary to allow for time to finalize those deliberations. Under the one-week agreement, funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (currently $148 million) is not altered. Republican leadership expressed confidence that another bill to set spending levels for the remainder of FY2017 will pass in advance of next Friday's deadline. NASAA will continue to keep you updated as negotiations continue.
    [post_title] => Congress Passes One-Week Funding Bill Averting Shutdown
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => congress-passes-one-week-funding-bill-averting-shutdown
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-10-03 18:48:09
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-03 18:48:09
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=4973
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Congress Passes One-Week Funding Bill Averting Shutdown

Congress Passes One-Week Funding Bill Averting Shutdown
April 28, 2017

Congress Passes One-Week Funding Bill Averting Shutdown

April 28, 2017 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel With funding for the federal government set to expire at midnight, Congress quickly passed a short-term spending agreement today to keep the government open for another week. Negotiations on a larger funding bill for the remainder of the fiscal year are progressing, but congressional leadership and the…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3108
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2017-04-05 02:07:54
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-05 02:07:54
    [post_content] => While NASAA and other arts organizations were in the midst of responding to the news that the Trump administration was proposing elimination of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in its fiscal year 2018 budget, details emerged last week that the administration also was encouraging Congress to consider reducing the agency's budget by $15 million for the remainder of the current fiscal year.

This proposal is especially problematic given the schedule of NEA grant cycles. Any cuts to the NEA's remaining FY2017 grants budget would have an acute impact on state arts agencies, because state Partnership Agreement awards are determined in the spring, with award start dates typically beginning in July. This point is especially important because—in addition to our outright opposition to any reduction in funding to the NEA—it is incumbent upon NASAA and state arts agencies to communicate to legislators that the latest proposal is especially impactful on states and must be rebuked by Congress.

I want to thank those of you who were able to attend Arts Advocacy Day in Washington, D.C., last month. The timing of the conference could not have been more beneficial, and the feedback we've received from members of Congress so far has been quite positive. If you were not able to attend this year, now is the time to contact your legislators and urge them to support the NEA. The government is currently operating under a short-term continuing resolution that is set to expire on April 28. Consequently, Congress is negotiating with the White House on the terms of a bill to fund the government until the end of the fiscal year (September 30). In contacting your members of Congress, please consider the following points:
  • Urge them to oppose the President's proposals to reduce the NEA's FY2017 budget and eliminate the NEA in FY2018.
  • Make sure to emphasize that a cut to the 2017 budget would impact state arts agencies.
  • Highlight a recent event or program undertaken by your agency.
  • Congress begins a two-week recess on April 8. If the opportunity presents itself, invite the member and their staff to take a tour. These visits help build a relationship with the elected official, while also providing an opportunity to reinforce the fact that funding for the NEA benefits every congressional district in the United States.
With the Trump administration making sweeping proposals to cut funding for federal programs far beyond the NEA, it is critical that Congress hears from us that cuts to the agency are unacceptable. Beyond the above talking points, feel free to consult NASAA's Advocacy Tools for helpful suggestions. If you are unsure whom to contact in Congress, use these links to identify your House and Senate delegations now. In urgent times like these, reaching every member of Congress is impactful—and it is especially important if your state is represented by one of the following members of either the House or Senate Interior Appropriations subcommittees: House Committee Republicans Ken Calvert, California, Chairman Mike Simpson, Idaho Tom Cole, Oklahoma David Joyce, Ohio Chris Stewart, Utah, Vice Chair Mark Amodei, Nevada Evan Jenkins, West Virginia Democrats Betty McCollum, Minnesota, Ranking Member Chellie Pingree, Maine Derek Kilmer, Washington Marcy Kaptur, Ohio Senate Committee Republicans Lisa Murkowski, Alaska, Chair Thad Cochran, Mississippi, Chair of Full Committee Lamar Alexander, Tennessee Roy Blunt, Missouri John Hoeven, North Dakota Mitch McConnell, Kentucky, Majority Leader Steve Daines, Montana Shelley Moore Capito, West Virginia Democrats Tom Udall, New Mexico, Ranking Member Diane Feinstein, California Patrick Leahy, Vermont Jack Reed, Rhode Island Jon Tester, Montana Jeff Merkley, Oregon Chris Van Hollen, Maryland Thank you for your timely outreach and enthusiasm in support of the National Endowment for the Arts. Congress has heard loud and clear that the NEA is a valued part of the federal government. By continuing to make this case, I am confident that we, along with our champions in Congress, will be able to preserve the NEA and make it even stronger moving forward. [post_title] => President Proposes FY2017 NEA Cut [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => president-proposes-fy2017-nea-cut [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-10 02:54:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-10 02:54:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 3094 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=newsletter&p=3108 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => newsletter [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
President Proposes FY2017 NEA Cut

President Proposes FY2017 NEA Cut
April 5, 2017

President Proposes FY2017 NEA Cut

While NASAA and other arts organizations were in the midst of responding to the news that the Trump administration was proposing elimination of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in its fiscal year 2018 budget, details emerged last week that the administration also was encouraging Congress to consider reducing the agency’s budget by $15…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3132
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2017-03-29 02:41:12
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-29 02:41:12
    [post_content] => 

March 28, 2017
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel

On Friday, the White House issued a list of proposed budget reductions for the current federal fiscal year (FY2017). The Trump administration sent Congress a list of $18 billion in suggested cuts in order to make funds available for an immediate increase in national security spending. The White House's list of suggested cuts includes a $15 million reduction in National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) grant funding for FY2017. Although the document sent to Congress has not been made public by the administration, news sources indicate that it recommends reductions to scores of domestic discretionary programs, including the Department of Education, the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Justice, the National Institutes of Health and others. It includes a recommended $15 million reduction for the National Endowment for the Humanities as well. Given the schedule of NEA grant cycles, any cuts to the NEA's remaining FY2017 grants budget would have an acute impact on state arts agencies. State Partnership Agreement awards are determined in the spring, with award start dates typically beginning in July. Please contact your House and Senate delegations now. Urge them to sustain the NEA at its current funding level ($148 million) for the remainder of federal FY2017. NASAA's Advocacy Tools offer helpful talking points. Your timely outreach is important because Congress is expected to take action on the FY2017 budget very soon. The continuing resolution that currently authorizes flat funding for all federal agencies expires on April 28. To avert a federal shutdown, Congress needs to pass legislation that determines funding levels for the remainder of the fiscal year. Remember that Congress—not the President—holds ultimate authority over the federal budget. Your outreach to Congress will help to keep the NEA FY2017 budget intact in the days ahead. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me. [post_title] => Remainder of NEA FY2017 Budget at Risk [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => remainder-nea-fy2017-budget-risk [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-21 20:14:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-21 20:14:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3132 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Remainder of NEA FY2017 Budget at Risk

Remainder of NEA FY2017 Budget at Risk
March 29, 2017

Remainder of NEA FY2017 Budget at Risk

March 28, 2017 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel On Friday, the White House issued a list of proposed budget reductions for the current federal fiscal year (FY2017). The Trump administration sent Congress a list of $18 billion in suggested cuts in order to make funds available for an immediate increase in national security spending. The White…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3128
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2017-03-16 02:41:08
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-16 02:41:08
    [post_content] => 
    [post_title] => NASAA Statement on Proposed Elimination of the NEA
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => nasaa-statement-proposed-elimination-nea
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-06-13 19:37:11
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-13 19:37:11
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3128
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
NASAA Statement on Proposed Elimination of the NEA

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3127
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2017-03-16 02:41:06
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-16 02:41:06
    [post_content] => March 15, 2017
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel

This morning, President Trump submitted his administration's first budget request to Congress.The proposal calls for an elimination of all funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in fiscal year 2018.

If this budget is enacted, the elimination of the NEA would have dire consequences for every state. For a synopsis of what's at stake, please see NASAA's Statement on Proposed Elimination of the NEA, issued early this morning.

This is the first—not the final—step in the FY2018 appropriations process. The President's request outlines his administration's policy priorities. However, Congress holds the constitutional authority to appropriate funds to federal agencies. Congress needs to hear from you that elimination of or radical reductions to the NEA are unacceptable to taxpayers.

NASAA has been preparing for months for this scenario. As Congress begins work on its own budget bills, we are already working with champions on Capitol Hill to deploy a bipartisan strategy for pushing back. Here's how you, your council members and constituents can help right now:

A reminder about fiscal years: Recall that state Partnership Agreement funds from the NEA are typically committed in March and used in the following state fiscal year. So today's proposal to eliminate the NEA in federal FY2018 would affect most states' FY2019 activities.

As events unfold, NASAA will keep you up to date. In the meantime, please don't hesitate tocontact me if you have any questions.

[post_title] => President Proposes Elimination of the NEA [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => president-proposes-elimination-nea [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-21 20:20:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-21 20:20:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3127 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
President Proposes Elimination of the NEA

President Proposes Elimination of the NEA
March 16, 2017

President Proposes Elimination of the NEA

March 15, 2017 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel This morning, President Trump submitted his administration’s first budget request to Congress.The proposal calls for an elimination of all funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in fiscal year 2018. If this budget is enacted, the elimination of the NEA would have dire consequences for every…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3096
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2017-03-14 01:42:22
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-14 01:42:22
    [post_content] => After months of speculation, President Trump and his administration are expected to release their first budget request for fiscal year 2018 this week.The release of any new administration's first budget is highly anticipated and there is wide-ranging speculation about what budget actions the Trump administration will recommend.

As a staunch supporter of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and of arts funding across the federal budget, we at NASAA stand with you in anticipation of the budget's release. It is our hope that the President does not, as some reports have indicated, call for significant cuts or an outright elimination of the NEA. In the event, however, that that is the President's request, please consider these important points:
  1. The President's budget request is in no way a binding document. It is the means through which the executive branch communicates its preference for how federal funds are allocated. Congress has the constitutional responsibility to appropriate federal funding for agencies.
  2. As a result, in recent years, the budget proposal, regardless of the party in control of the White House, has become more of a political document than a policy document. Recent presidents have tended to use the budget proposal as a means of highlighting overarching long-term goals rather than specific policies they hope to implement in the next fiscal year.
  3. The NEA has strong, bipartisan support in Congress. The importance of this should not be ignored. As recently as two weeks ago, in response to strong testimony in support of the NEA from a Democratic member of the Appropriations Subcommittee (which has jurisdiction over the NEA's budget), Subcommittee Chair Rep. Ken Calvert (R-CA) responded, "As you know, there's always been bipartisan support for these programs and I suspect that there will be in the future, too."
When the budget is released later this week, NASAA will be prepared with information about the request and how state arts agencies can most effectively respond. Ideally, we will be strategizing about how to raise funding for the NEA, but in the event we are dealing with significant threat, please know that we are ready to engage on your behalf. [post_title] => Awaiting Trump's Budget Request [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => awaiting-trumps-budget-request [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-20 01:59:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-20 01:59:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 3093 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=newsletter&p=3096 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => newsletter [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Awaiting Trump's Budget Request

Awaiting Trump's Budget Request
March 14, 2017

Awaiting Trump's Budget Request

After months of speculation, President Trump and his administration are expected to release their first budget request for fiscal year 2018 this week.The release of any new administration’s first budget is highly anticipated and there is wide-ranging speculation about what budget actions the Trump administration will recommend. As a staunch supporter of the National Endowment…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 913
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2017-02-08 01:28:30
    [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-08 01:28:30
    [post_content] => Washington is abuzz with activity. After years of gridlock brought on by policy disagreements between the Obama administration and the Republican leadership that controlled both chambers of Congress, that party is now in control of both the legislative and executive branches of the federal government. Historically, one-party control leads to busy and productive governing periods in Washington. The last time one party controlled both branches, 2009-2011, was one of the most historic windows of legislative lawmaking in American history. In that window, President Obama, working with a Democrat-controlled Congress, was able to pass into law several sweeping pieces of legislation, including health reform (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act), financial reform (the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act), and the stimulus bill (the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act).

It is with this historical context, and the fact that President Trump was elected on a sweeping platform, that Washington has been girding itself for another significant period. The President campaigned on promises to repeal the Affordable Care Act, reform the tax code, renegotiate international trade pacts, and implement significant new policies and laws related to immigration. All of these initiatives require at least some congressional action, so members of Congress are working at a furious pace to try to begin the process and devise these significant and complicated pieces of legislation.

There is, however, an important variable that has delayed this work, and that is direction from the new administration. President Trump and his team ran a different type of campaign, often bucking traditional norms, on the way to the White House. Since his inauguration on January 20, President Trump and his team have signaled that they expect that style to continue. As a result, policymakers and advocates are left with very little information about the new President's views on several issues of governance. Never has this been more true than in setting funding levels for federal agencies. As you may recall, rather than passing legislation last December that would fund the federal government until the end of the fiscal year (September 30), Congress, at then President-elect Trump's request, opted for a shorter-term bill that funds government agencies only until April 28. As a result, any negotiations on funding bills for both the remainder of fiscal year 2017 and FY2018 should be accelerating. They aren't, because the Trump administration has not indicated to Congress its plans, at the highest levels, for funding specific federal agencies.

I emphasize this point to illustrate the need to view the report that emerged from The Hill in January within the broader reality in which we live today. That story identified two people working on the Trump transition team who were urging soon-to-be members of the President's staff at the Office of Management and Budget (a very powerful office within the executive branch that oversees federal spending and regulatory policy) to incorporate provisions of the Heritage Foundation's Blueprint for Reform: A Comprehensive Policy Agenda for a New Administration in 2017. That report calls for a drastic downsizing of the federal government and elimination of a wide range of federal agencies and offices, including the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

This report was met by arts advocates with justifiably significant concern. The fact that there were members of the then President-elect's transition team with those views is deeply troubling and warrants significant discussion among all of us about how we, as a community, want to respond to this potential threat to the NEA. As we look forward, I want to raise a few important points:
  • There is no indication at this time that that report, including the specific recommendation to eliminate the NEA, has any support from the Trump administration. Recently, two senior political aides to the President were assigned to the National Endowment for the Arts as the first step in transitioning the agency. Both have stated in meetings that they requested the assignment and support the agency's underlying mission.
  • While there is a huge unknown with regard to the Trump administration's vision for reshaping the federal government, there is an equally significant known variable, in that the current Republican leadership in Congress has been in place for seven years. Through the handiwork of arts advocates we've created strong, bipartisan relationships with members of Congress who understand the value of the NEA. It is these strong relationships that allowed for proposed increases in NEA funding by both chambers of Congress last year ($2 million in the House and $500,000 in the Senate).
  • Should the President propose a significant reduction or outright elimination of the NEA's funding, NASAA and our colleagues at other arts service organizations are organized and prepared to mobilize. Fortunately, such a step is not possible without the support of Congress.
While it is difficult for all of us to wait to hear from the administration about its intentions, there are proactive things we can all do right now to support the NEA and its federal funding. I urge you to consult the guidance in NASAA's The Practical Advocate series: Establishing relationships now, before work on the President's budget begins, is always important, but this year it is absolutely critical. Because Congress is already behind in devising an appropriations bill for fiscal years 2017 and 2018, staff will have to work on an accelerated time line to finish their work once they get the President's budget request. As a result, it may be very difficult for staff to make meetings with the wide-ranging constituent groups that will be seeking out the opportunity to make their case for funding. Therefore, building a rapport now will yield tremendous benefits once the appropriations process begins. As is always the case, I am grateful to each of you for being so diligent in making the case for why federal support for the NEA and state arts agencies is so important. NASAA will continue to keep you updated as events unfold, and please do not hesitate to reach out to me if you have any questions. [post_title] => Facts: Arts and the White House [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => facts-arts-white-house [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-10 02:36:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-10 02:36:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 911 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=newsletter&p=913 [menu_order] => 3 [post_type] => newsletter [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Facts: Arts and the White House

Facts: Arts and the White House
February 8, 2017

Facts: Arts and the White House

Washington is abuzz with activity. After years of gridlock brought on by policy disagreements between the Obama administration and the Republican leadership that controlled both chambers of Congress, that party is now in control of both the legislative and executive branches of the federal government. Historically, one-party control leads to busy and productive governing periods…

2016

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3131
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2016-06-14 02:41:11
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-06-14 02:41:11
    [post_content] => 
June 14, 2016
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 16:03
This morning, the Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee advanced legislation funding several agencies, including the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). That legislation recommends increasing funding for the NEA (currently at $148 million) by $500,000 for fiscal year 2017. The full Senate Appropriations Committee announced that it plans to consider and approve the legislation during a markup hearing this Thursday morning.
The modest increase in funding, only $500,000, is disappointing, particularly because it is lower than the $2 million increase (to $149.85 million) proposed by President Obama and currently being considered in the House of Representatives. That being said, it is important to keep in mind that, in advancing this bill today, the Interior Subcommittee approved legislation that cuts the overall funding for agencies included within the bill (which, in addition to the NEA, includes the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of the Interior) by $125 million.
As the full Senate Appropriations Committee prepares to consider the legislation on Thursday, I urge any of you represented by one of the members of the committee to reach out to that office and make the following points:
  • Acknowledge that the committee, while reducing overall funding within the bill, did increase funding for the NEA.
  • Then urge the senator to support increasing funding for the NEA to at least the $2 million figure supported by the president and the Republican-controlled House of Representatives. Add, for context, that NASAA and other arts advocates are urging NEA funding at $155 million.
  • Thank them for Congress's continued support of the federal-state partnership that directs 40% of all grant dollars appropriated to the NEA to state arts agencies (SAAs).
  • Let them know what your agency is doing and how important NEA funding is to your operations.
As I mentioned when the House bill was introduced a few weeks ago, while NASAA supports the legislation as currently drafted, we greatly appreciate your outreach to these offices for at least two reasons. First, even in years where funding for the NEA is increased, members of Congress want to know what their constituents think. Second, in addition to approving the appropriations bill, the committee will approve a yet to be released committee report that accompanies the legislative text; this report sends directive language to the executive branch regarding how Congress believes the administration should spend the funds. It is in this text where support is usually expressed for the allocation of 40% of NEA program funds to SAAs, as well as other priorities for SAAs. Therefore, having committee members hear from state arts agencies and their supporters will only help us as that document is developed.
Thank you for your continued attention and efforts. It makes all the difference!
[post_title] => Senate Advances NEA Funding Bill [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => senate-advances-nea-funding-bill [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-20 02:49:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-20 02:49:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3131 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Senate Advances NEA Funding Bill

Senate Advances NEA Funding Bill
June 14, 2016

Senate Advances NEA Funding Bill

June 14, 2016 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 16:03 This morning, the Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee advanced legislation funding several agencies, including the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). That legislation recommends increasing funding for the NEA (currently at $148 million) by $500,000 for fiscal year 2017. The full Senate Appropriations Committee announced that it…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3134
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2016-05-24 02:45:40
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-05-24 02:45:40
    [post_content] => May 24, 2016

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 16:02

This morning, the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee, which has jurisdiction over the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) budget, released its draft bill for fiscal year 2017 appropriations.

Included within the bill is a proposed funding level of $149.85 million, an increase of $2 million over the agency's current funding level. That number matches the president's requested amount and demonstrates the bipartisan support the agency continues to receive from Congress. NASAA continues to urge Congress to increase the NEA's budget to $155 million, but appreciates the proposed increase in funding for the agency, particularly given that Congress continues to encounter strong pressure to reduce domestic discretionary spending.

With the bill now proposed, the committee will hold a mark-up hearing on the legislationtomorrow, May 25, at 11:00 a.m.  Given the limited time before the hearing is to begin, if you are represented by a member of the Interior Subcommittee, we urge you to contact that member and express the following:
  1. Urge them to support the proposed NEA funding level of $149.85 million.
  2. Thank them for Congress's continued support of the federal-state partnership that directs 40% of all grant dollars appropriated to the NEA to state arts agencies.
  3. Let them know what your agency is doing and how important NEA funding is to your operations.
NASAA developed these NEA Fast Facts that may make useful talking points. We will continue to monitor events in D.C. as this situation unfolds and will keep you up to speed. [post_title] => House Appropriations Committee Releases Draft Budget for NEA [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => house-appropriations-committee-releases-draft-budget-nea [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-20 02:49:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-20 02:49:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3134 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
House Appropriations Committee Releases Draft Budget for NEA

House Appropriations Committee Releases Draft Budget for NEA
May 24, 2016

House Appropriations Committee Releases Draft Budget for NEA

May 24, 2016 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 16:02 This morning, the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee, which has jurisdiction over the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) budget, released its draft bill for fiscal year 2017 appropriations. Included within the bill is a proposed funding level of $149.85 million, an increase of $2 million over…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3135
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2016-02-09 02:45:42
    [post_date_gmt] => 2016-02-09 02:45:42
    [post_content] => February 9, 2016

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 16:01

This morning, President Obama released his fiscal year 2017 budget proposal to Congress. This document, which is not binding, expresses the Obama administration's policy priorities for the coming fiscal year and makes recommendations for agency funding levels.

In his FY2017 budget proposal, the president is urging Congress to fund the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $149.8 million, an increase of nearly $2 million over current funding. While we are disappointed that the administration did not seek a higher level of funding, we are pleased that for the second year in a row an increase in funding for the agency was proposed. This will serve as an excellent starting point when arts advocates from throughout the country come to Washington, D.C., next month for Arts Advocacy Day.

With the budget now proposed, Congress will begin the process of writing and considering appropriations for all federal agencies and the NEA, with the goal of having a budget passed and signed into law before current funding expires on September 30.
    [post_title] => President's 2017 Budget Proposes Modest Increase for NEA
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => presidents-2017-budget-proposes-modest-increase-nea
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-20 02:49:33
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-20 02:49:33
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3135
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
President's 2017 Budget Proposes Modest Increase for NEA

President's 2017 Budget Proposes Modest Increase for NEA
February 9, 2016

President's 2017 Budget Proposes Modest Increase for NEA

February 9, 2016 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 16:01 This morning, President Obama released his fiscal year 2017 budget proposal to Congress. This document, which is not binding, expresses the Obama administration’s policy priorities for the coming fiscal year and makes recommendations for agency funding levels. In his FY2017 budget proposal, the president is urging…

2015

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2963
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-12-22 10:48:58
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-12-22 10:48:58
    [post_content] => December 22, 2015

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:17

As indicated in last week's Legislative Alert, the fiscal year 2016 federal budget bill recently signed into law appropriates $147,949,000 to the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). This represents a $1.9 million increase for the arts agency. As historically has been the case, 40% of the grant funds associated with that increase are set aside for state and regional arts organizations.

Yesterday, the House and Senate appropriations committees released report language accompanying the budget bill. The report contains several provisions of note for state arts agencies:
  • Congress affirms explicit support of the 40% allocation to state arts agencies.
  • Congress praises the NEA's direct programmatic work in its Healing Arts Partnership program with Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Fort Belvoir Community Hospital.
  • The report urges state arts agencies to explore providing arts therapy programs to service members and their families at the local level. This is encouragement, not a requirement.
You may recall that NASAA's FY2016 action plan, approved by the membership in October, identifies arts and military programs as a key issue area. In the months ahead, NASAA will help your agency consider your options. We will identify and share models of state arts agency practices. We also will provide forums for the exchange of ideas, strategies and guidance on developing programs and partnerships at the state level. Stay tuned, and be sure to keep us apprised of your efforts on this front [post_title] => Congress Issues Report on NEA 2016 Budget [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => congress-issues-report-nea-2016-budget [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:01:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:01:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2963 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Congress Issues Report on NEA 2016 Budget

Congress Issues Report on NEA 2016 Budget
December 22, 2015

Congress Issues Report on NEA 2016 Budget

December 22, 2015 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:17 As indicated in last week’s Legislative Alert, the fiscal year 2016 federal budget bill recently signed into law appropriates $147,949,000 to the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). This represents a $1.9 million increase for the arts agency. As historically has been the case, 40% of the…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2978
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-12-16 11:02:31
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-12-16 11:02:31
    [post_content] => December 16, 2015

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:16

Late last night, House Speaker Paul Ryan announced that Congress had reached a deal with the Obama administration on legislation funding the federal government for the remainder of fiscal year 2016. The legislation calls for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) to be funded at $147.9 million, an increase of almost $2 million over the agency's FY2015 level. The fact that Congress chose to increase funding for the agency in this highly partisan environment demonstrates the tremendous progress that has been made to educate members of both parties about the value of federal support for the arts.

With the deal now reached by leadership, rank-and-file members are expected to have until late Thursday, at the earliest, to consider the legislation before voting on passage. Therefore we encourage you to reach out to your elected officials in Congress and urge them to support this budget deal. In doing so, please thank them for their support for the NEA and remind them that 40% of grant dollars appropriated to the NEA go directly to state arts agencies.

As events unfold, NASAA will continue to keep you updated.
    [post_title] => Congress Reaches Budget Deal, NEA to Receive Funding Increase
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => congress-reaches-budget-deal-nea-receive-funding-increase
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:08:21
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:08:21
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2978
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Congress Reaches Budget Deal, NEA to Receive Funding Increase

Congress Reaches Budget Deal, NEA to Receive Funding Increase
December 16, 2015

Congress Reaches Budget Deal, NEA to Receive Funding Increase

December 16, 2015 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:16 Late last night, House Speaker Paul Ryan announced that Congress had reached a deal with the Obama administration on legislation funding the federal government for the remainder of fiscal year 2016. The legislation calls for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) to be funded at…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2964
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-12-10 11:02:16
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-12-10 11:02:16
    [post_content] => December 10, 2015

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:15

Today, President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) into law. The law, which revises the No Child Left Behind Act enacted in 2001, provides states greater autonomy in setting school standards and curricula. It includes arts and music among subjects that comprise a "well-rounded education." My December NASAA Notes column provides further details on the arts education content of the law.

The next step in the process is for the U.S. Department of Education to provide states with guidance about implementing ESSA. NASAA will keep you informed as this activity progresses.
    [post_title] => Obama Signs Education Bill
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => obama-signs-education-bill
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:08:30
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:08:30
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2964
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Obama Signs Education Bill

Obama Signs Education Bill
December 10, 2015

Obama Signs Education Bill

December 10, 2015 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:15 Today, President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) into law. The law, which revises the No Child Left Behind Act enacted in 2001, provides states greater autonomy in setting school standards and curricula. It includes arts and music among subjects that comprise a “well-rounded education.” My…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2965
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-12-01 11:02:18
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-12-01 11:02:18
    [post_content] => December 1, 2015

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:14

After weeks of negotiations, House and Senate leaders announced Monday that they had reached an agreement on a framework for legislation that amends the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the nation's preeminent law governing public schools. Should the legislation pass in both chambers of Congress as expected, it would be the first time since the No Child Left Behind Act was enacted in 2001 that the law has been updated. The legislation, the Every Student Succeeds Act, would provide states and local education agencies greater autonomy in setting curricula and standards.

The National Governors Association has endorsed the bill. NASAA is not taking a formal position on the full legislation (which contains many provisions not applicable to the arts), but we applaud the provisions it contains that support arts education in America's schools.

A more substantive summary of the Every Student Succeeds Act will be forthcoming in the December issue of NASAA Notes, but we want to make you aware now of some of the significant provisions that impact the arts within the bill.

The legislation eliminates all "Core Academic Subjects" and in their place creates a definition for a "well-rounded education." The legislation defines the term as "courses, activities, and programming in subjects such as English, reading or language arts, writing, science, technology, engineering, mathematics, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, geography, computer science, music, career and technical education, health, physical education, and any other subject, as determined by the State or local educational agency, with the purpose of providing all students access to an enriched curriculum and educational experience" (emphases mine). All of these subjects are allowable, but states would enjoy flexibility to choose among them. It is also important to note that the subjects listed in the definition of a well-rounded education—including arts and music—are specified as eligible uses of Title I funds within the bill. Title I funds are the largest pool of federal resources dedicated to ensuring equitable access to a complete education for all students.

Additional arts provisions of note in the bill:
  • Funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program is maintained, and arts and music education are explicitly identified as being eligible for funding.
  • Also significant is that the programs currently supported by the Department of Education's Arts in Education fund would continue under the new legislation.
  • The legislation encourages states to integrate "other academic subjects, including the arts, into STEM programs . . . ."
While timing for this legislation is uncertain, it appears likely that the House will vote on the legislation this week, with the Senate set to follow next week. NASAA will keep you updated as events unfold. We sincerely appreciate the efforts made to advance arts in education as this bill advanced. There is no question that the successes outlined above are a direct result of your hard work. [post_title] => Education Bill Close to Passage in Congress [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => education-bill-close-passage-congress [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:08:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:08:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2965 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Education Bill Close to Passage in Congress

Education Bill Close to Passage in Congress
December 1, 2015

Education Bill Close to Passage in Congress

December 1, 2015 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:14 After weeks of negotiations, House and Senate leaders announced Monday that they had reached an agreement on a framework for legislation that amends the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the nation’s preeminent law governing public schools. Should the legislation pass in both chambers of Congress as…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2966
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-10-30 11:02:19
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-10-30 11:02:19
    [post_content] => October 30, 2015

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:13

With Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) set to retire at the end of the week, Republican congressional leadership and President Obama reached an agreement that would increase federal spending levels for domestic and defense programs over the next two years, while also suspending the congressionally instituted debt limit until early 2017.

In reaching this accord, two potential political land mines have likely been averted. The deal should eliminate any chance of a federal government shutdown for the duration of the legislation, while also removing the possibility of a standoff between the White House and Congress over whether to raise the debt limit.

It is important to note that the agreement is not an appropriations bill, meaning that it does not set funding levels for individual agencies, including the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). Those levels will be determined by the appropriations committees, which already are working to pass legislation before the current funding bill expires on December 11.

While the budget agreement will raise the cap for domestic spending by approximately $40 billion over two years, that money will be appropriated among domestic agencies as Congress sees fit (as long as the president agrees to sign the bill). As a result, most agencies will continue to be funded at current levels for the remainder of this fiscal year. As it did when Congress began the FY2016 budget process, NASAA urges the House and Senate to fund the NEA at $155 million for the remainder of FY2016.
    [post_title] => Congress, President Agree on Budget Bill; Spending Set for Two Years
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => congress-president-agree-budget-bill-spending-set-two-years
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:08:59
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:08:59
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2966
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Congress, President Agree on Budget Bill; Spending Set for Two Years

Congress, President Agree on Budget Bill; Spending Set for Two Years
October 30, 2015

Congress, President Agree on Budget Bill; Spending Set for Two Years

October 30, 2015 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:13 With Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) set to retire at the end of the week, Republican congressional leadership and President Obama reached an agreement that would increase federal spending levels for domestic and defense programs over the next two years, while also suspending the…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2967
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-09-30 11:02:20
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-09-30 11:02:20
    [post_content] => September 30, 2015

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:12

With funding for the federal government set to expire at midnight this evening, the House of Representatives passed legislation today that will keep government agencies funded and operating until December 11. The bill matches legislation passed in the Senate earlier this week and is expected to be signed into law by President Obama shortly.

The legislation, known as a continuing resolution (CR), is not a formal budget bill, but extends funding for all federal agencies at their current levels. As a result, the budget for the National Endowment for the Arts will remain at $146 million. It is unclear at this time whether Congress will attempt to pass a formal budget in December, or once again use a CR to keep agencies operating.

Passage of the CR was in doubt for much of the month, as leaders in both chambers struggled with whether to include language that would prohibit funding for Planned Parenthood, language opposed by President Obama and most Democrats. With the passage of this bill, that issue is temporarily tabled, but is expected to remain a key facet of future negotiations.
    [post_title] => Congress Passes CR to Fund Government for 10 Weeks
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => congress-passes-cr-fund-government-10-weeks
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:09:10
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:09:10
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2967
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Congress Passes CR to Fund Government for 10 Weeks

Congress Passes CR to Fund Government for 10 Weeks
September 30, 2015

Congress Passes CR to Fund Government for 10 Weeks

September 30, 2015 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:12 With funding for the federal government set to expire at midnight this evening, the House of Representatives passed legislation today that will keep government agencies funded and operating until December 11. The bill matches legislation passed in the Senate earlier this week and is expected to…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2968
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-07-17 11:02:21
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-07-17 11:02:21
    [post_content] => From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:11

July 17, 2015

Yesterday, the Senate passed with bipartisan support (81-17) the Every Child Achieves Act, which would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the nation's most substantive federal law overseeing public education. The vote comes one week after the House of Representatives passed its own version of the bill, the Student Success Act.

The bill passed in the Senate was carefully crafted and negotiated by Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN), chair of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, and Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), the committee's top Democrat. It includes several provisions supported by NASAA, including preservation of the arts as a core academic subject and eligibility of the arts in preschool education funding as well as after-school initiatives.

The House and Senate are expected now to go to conference to negotiate the differences between their bills. The differences in the approaches being taken by the two chambers are significant for the arts: the House act eliminates a federal definition of core academic subjects, which is where arts education has been referenced as an eligible Title I expenditure in the past. Depending on how negotiations proceed, each chamber could vote on a compromise bill in the fall.

We also want to note that fiscal year 2016 Interior Appropriations bill, which includes the budget for the National Endowment for the Arts and appeared headed for passage last week, has stalled due to disagreements with portions of the legislation unrelated to the arts endowment. We will continue to monitor the situation closely and let you know if and when the bill comes up again for a vote.
    [post_title] => Senate Passes Education Reform Legislation, House Interior Bill Remains Stalled
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => senate-passes-education-reform-legislation-house-interior-bill-remains-stalled
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:09:22
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:09:22
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2968
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Senate Passes Education Reform Legislation, House Interior Bill Remains Stalled

Senate Passes Education Reform Legislation, House Interior Bill Remains Stalled
July 17, 2015

Senate Passes Education Reform Legislation, House Interior Bill Remains Stalled

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:11 July 17, 2015 Yesterday, the Senate passed with bipartisan support (81-17) the Every Child Achieves Act, which would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the nation’s most substantive federal law overseeing public education. The vote comes one week after the House of Representatives passed its own version of the bill,…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2969
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-07-08 11:02:22
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-07-08 11:02:22
    [post_content] => From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:09

Today, the House of Representatives approved H.R. 5, the Student Success Act, by a vote of 218-213. The bill passed along party lines, with no Democrats supporting the measure.

As we reported earlier, this bill represents the most significant progress made toward amending the Elementary and Secondary Education Act since the law was last reformed in 2001. That law, the No Child Left Behind Act, expired in 2006, and efforts to work on the law since have failed. Should it become law, H.R. 5 would alter significantly the role of the U.S. Department of Education in setting and funding public education programming in the United States. Most specifically, the bill eliminates the Core Academic Subjects definition under Title I of the law that has been a bedrock principle of education policy in the United States, and in its place provides grants directly to states and local education agencies to define and fund policy priorities.

While not taking a position on H.R. 5, NASAA and other arts advocates have long supported the Core Academic Subjects provision because it identifies the arts as a subject eligible for federal funding under Title I.

Despite the success of today's vote, the chances of this legislation becoming law are in doubt. Earlier this year, the Obama administration issued a Statement of Administration Policyasserting that it would veto the legislation if it were to pass in both chambers. The Senate is considering its own legislation, the Every Child Achieves Act, which has been carefully negotiated between Senate Education Committee Chair Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and the panel's top Democrat, Patty Murray (D-WA).

Also of note: The House of Representatives is expected to approve the fiscal year 2016 budget for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) very soon; NASAA will send you an alert when that occurs. As of publication, the NEA's current budget of $146 million is expected to be preserved.
    [post_title] => House Passes Education Reform Legislation
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-passes-education-reform-legislation
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:09:29
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:09:29
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2969
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Passes Education Reform Legislation

House Passes Education Reform Legislation
July 8, 2015

House Passes Education Reform Legislation

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:09 Today, the House of Representatives approved H.R. 5, the Student Success Act, by a vote of 218-213. The bill passed along party lines, with no Democrats supporting the measure. As we reported earlier, this bill represents the most significant progress made toward amending the Elementary and Secondary Education Act since…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2970
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-07-06 11:02:23
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-07-06 11:02:23
    [post_content] => From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:08

When Congress returns to session Tuesday it is expected to consider several pieces of legislation that impact the arts.

National Endowment for the Arts

As we noted in an alert two weeks ago, the House of Representatives is expected to continue debating the Interior Appropriations Bill, which includes funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for fiscal year 2016. That legislation currently funds the agency at $146 million, or level funding. The bill is being considered under an "open rule" that allows any member of the House to introduce an amendment impacting the agency (either positively or negatively). Should such an amendment be introduced, we will notify you.

In the meantime, please reach out to your House delegation and urge them to support funding for the NEA of at least the proposed level of $146 million. Remind them that 40% of all grant dollars appropriated to the federal agency goes directly to state arts agencies—as a result, any reduction (or increase) in funding directly impacts states.

Education

NASAA also has learned that this week the Senate will begin floor debate on the Every Child Achieves Act, legislation that would amend the nation's preeminent education law, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). The legislation, introduced by Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN), was approved unanimously by the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee earlier this year. In its current form, the bill preserves the arts as a core academic subject of learning, maintains support for after-school learning programs and provides for activities currently administered through the U.S. Department of Education's Arts in Education grant program. These provisions are constructive in their efforts to sustain arts education for students.

This week, the House of Representatives is expected to consider its own bill reforming ESEA. That legislation, H.R. 5, the Student Success Act, does not define core academic subjects, and also eliminates funding for current after-school and arts in education programs, instead providing grants to states and local school districts.

It is important to note that amendments will be considered by both legislatures that could change the composition of either bill. But however this legislation evolves, it is important for arts education to be included. We therefore encourage state arts agencies to contact your members of Congress to urge that they support provisions that enhance opportunities for arts education in America's public schools.

If you have any questions about the appropriations or education bills under consideration this week, please feel to contact me at isaac@38northsolutions.com. We will continue to keep you updated as these matters unfold.
    [post_title] => House and Senate Consider Arts Legislation This Week
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-senate-consider-arts-legislation-week
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:09:37
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:09:37
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2970
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House and Senate Consider Arts Legislation This Week

House and Senate Consider Arts Legislation This Week
July 6, 2015

House and Senate Consider Arts Legislation This Week

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:08 When Congress returns to session Tuesday it is expected to consider several pieces of legislation that impact the arts. National Endowment for the Arts As we noted in an alert two weeks ago, the House of Representatives is expected to continue debating the Interior Appropriations Bill, which includes funding for…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2971
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-06-18 11:02:24
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-06-18 11:02:24
    [post_content] => From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:07

This week, the House and Senate Appropriations Committees passed legislation funding the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for fiscal year 2016. In both bills, the NEA's current funding of $146 million is maintained. While NASAA and other arts organizations had been urging Congress to support the agency at $155 million, we are grateful for the committee's proposed funding level, given that sequestration, which requires a reduction in federal spending, remains in place.

Call to Action

Next week, the House of Representatives is expected to vote on the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies appropriations bill, which includes the NEA's budget. NASAA has learned that when the bill is considered next week, it is possible that an amendment to the bill might be offered that would reduce funding for the agency. As we work to learn more information about this potential amendment, we urge you to contact your representatives in the House, urging them to support the NEA's current funding level and to oppose any amendment that reduces funding.

In making this case, please remind your representative's staff that 40% of all grant dollars appropriated to the NEA goes directly to states and regions. Then talk about an arts project or event taking place in their district that can be connected to the NEA. This is a great way to drive home the point that funding for the federal agency benefits every district in the United States as a result of the partnership with state arts agencies.

You can identify your legislators by using this link:

http://www.house.gov

As soon as we learn more information about the vote next week, we will share it with you.
    [post_title] => NEA Appropriations Bills Advance, Negative Amendment Possible
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => nea-appropriations-bills-advance-negative-amendment-possible
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:09:46
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:09:46
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2971
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
NEA Appropriations Bills Advance, Negative Amendment Possible

NEA Appropriations Bills Advance, Negative Amendment Possible
June 18, 2015

NEA Appropriations Bills Advance, Negative Amendment Possible

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:07 This week, the House and Senate Appropriations Committees passed legislation funding the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for fiscal year 2016. In both bills, the NEA’s current funding of $146 million is maintained. While NASAA and other arts organizations had been urging Congress to support the agency at…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2972
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-06-09 11:02:25
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-06-09 11:02:25
    [post_content] => From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:06

This morning, the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee, which has jurisdiction over the budget of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), released the agency's draft budget for fiscal year 2016. The bill proposes funding for the NEA at $146,021,000. This number matches the agency's current level. While that number is below the president's request of almost $148 million, and well below the $155 million arts advocates were seeking, it is important to note that just last year, the same committee initially proposed cutting the NEA's budget to $138 million. Further, sequestration, which requires federal funding to be reduced each year, remains in effect.

Also of interest, the committee recommends funding the National Endowment for the Humanities at $146,021,000 for FY2016.

In releasing the bill, the committee announced that it plans to hold a hearing to mark up the bill tomorrow morning, June 10. If you are represented by someone on the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee (see list below), please reach out to their office to share the following:
  1. Thank the committee for supporting level funding, and urge the member to continue to support this level of funding as the bill moves through the committee process and onto the floor.
  2. Remind the member's office that because of the strong partnership between state arts agencies and the NEA, 40% of all grant dollars appropriated to the NEA is given to state arts agencies and regional arts organizations.
  3. Take the opportunity to tell the staffer about an exciting arts or cultural event going on in their district this summer. Many staffers spend time in their boss's state during the August recess, and this is a great opportunity to build on your relationship.
House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee Republicans Ken Calvert, California, Chairman Mike Simpson, Idaho, Vice Chair Tom Cole, Oklahoma David Joyce, Ohio Chris Stewart, Utah Mark Amodei, Nevada Evan Jenkins, West Virginia Democrats Betty McCollum, Minnesota, Ranking Member Chellie Pingree, Maine Derek Kilmer, Washington Steve Israel, New York With the House committee moving on this bill, it is looking quite possible that the House could pass the bill by the time it adjourns for the August recess. Although the Senate has not yet released its draft bill for the NEA's budget, the Senate Appropriations Committee has begun the process of considering appropriations bills for other agencies. As a result, it is quite possible that the House and Senate could pass their legislation before Labor Day. What remains to be seen is whether both the House and Senate will support similar funding levels. If they do, the NEA will likely have its budget set before the fiscal year expires on September 30.   [post_title] => NEA Draft Budget Released, Hearing Wednesday [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => nea-draft-budget-released-hearing-wednesday [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:10:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:10:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2972 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
NEA Draft Budget Released, Hearing Wednesday

NEA Draft Budget Released, Hearing Wednesday
June 9, 2015

NEA Draft Budget Released, Hearing Wednesday

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:06 This morning, the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee, which has jurisdiction over the budget of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), released the agency’s draft budget for fiscal year 2016. The bill proposes funding for the NEA at $146,021,000. This number matches the agency’s current level. While that number…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2973
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-04-14 11:02:26
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-14 11:02:26
    [post_content] => April 14, 2015

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:05

This afternoon, the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee will hold a markup of the Every Child Achieves Act of 2015, legislation aimed at amending the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the nation's preeminent law governing public education. The law was last amended in 2001, when the No Child Left Behind Act was passed. That bill expired in 2006, and efforts since to reform public education in Congress have failed.

If you are represented by a member of the HELP Committee, we urge you to reach out to that elected official today and strongly urge them to support inclusion of the arts in public education.

Here are some talking points to consider:
  • Thank the committee for supporting the continued inclusion of the arts as a core academic subject.
  • The bill, as currently drafted, does not explicitly include support for the arts in after-school programs. Urge your senator to support such a change.
  • The bill, as currently drafted, does not include language referencing the Arts in Education Program at the Department of Education. Urge your member of Congress to support language allowing the agency to continue to administer a direct, nationally funded, competitive Arts in Education grant program that advances the capacity of the arts to strengthen learning and improve teaching.
The version of the Every Child Achieves Act under consideration today reflects changes that have been made since its introduction, through negotiations with the HELP Committee's top Democrat, Patty Murray (D-WA). Here is the revised Every Child Achieves Act. While it is difficult to predict how hearings like this will unfold, the fact that the bill now has the working efforts of the panel's leadership will make passage more likely. It is important, if you are represented by a member of the HELP Committee, to urge the Senate to support arts education in the Every Child Achieves Act. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Republicans by Rank Lamar Alexander (TN) Michael B. Enzi (WY) Richard Burr (NC) Johnny Isakson (GA) Rand Paul (KY) Susan Collins (ME) Lisa Murkowski (AK) Mark Kirk (IL) Tim Scott (SC) Orrin G. Hatch (UT) Pat Roberts (KS) Bill Cassidy, M.D. (LA) Democrats by Rank Patty Murray (WA) Barbara A. Mikulski (MD) Bernard Sanders (I) (VT) Robert P. Casey, Jr. (PA) Al Franken (MN) Michael F. Bennet (CO) Sheldon Whitehouse (RI) Tammy Baldwin (WI) Christopher S. Murphy (CT) Elizabeth Warren (MA) [post_title] => Senate Committee Holds Hearing Today on Education Reform Bill [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => senate-committee-holds-hearing-today-education-reform-bill [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-24 00:13:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-24 00:13:17 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2973 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Senate Committee Holds Hearing Today on Education Reform Bill

Senate Committee Holds Hearing Today on Education Reform Bill
April 14, 2015

Senate Committee Holds Hearing Today on Education Reform Bill

April 14, 2015 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:05 This afternoon, the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee will hold a markup of the Every Child Achieves Act of 2015, legislation aimed at amending the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the nation’s preeminent law governing public education. The law was last amended in 2001,…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2974
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-03-24 11:02:27
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-24 11:02:27
    [post_content] => March 24, 2015

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:04

The U.S. House of Representatives will soon begin formulating budgets for fiscal year 2016 for all federal agencies. To set the stage for consideration of arts funding levels, members of the Congressional Arts Caucus recently circulated a "dear colleague" letter urging an increase funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

The letter urges the committee with jurisdiction over the NEA budget—the House Subcommittee on Interior, Environment and Related Agencies—to appropriate up to $154.466 million for the NEA in FY2016. The authors note the impact of the arts as a generator of jobs, tourism revenues and export sales. They also applaud the NEA's efforts to integrate the arts into military and veterans' health care programs and note the important role that state arts agencies play in regranting federal funds and leveraging additional local and state investment.

A bipartisan effort, the letter was signed by 134 representatives. This letter is not a bill—the subcommittee has yet to recommend its funding amount for the NEA. However, this communication is an important example of how lawmakers from both sides of the aisle recognize the NEA as playing a valued role in federal domestic policy.

If your member of Congress was among the signers, please be sure to thank your representative for his or her support.
    [post_title] => House Letter Supports Increase in NEA Funding
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-letter-supports-increase-nea-funding
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:10:23
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:10:23
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2974
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Letter Supports Increase in NEA Funding

House Letter Supports Increase in NEA Funding
March 24, 2015

House Letter Supports Increase in NEA Funding

March 24, 2015 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:04 The U.S. House of Representatives will soon begin formulating budgets for fiscal year 2016 for all federal agencies. To set the stage for consideration of arts funding levels, members of the Congressional Arts Caucus recently circulated a “dear colleague” letter urging an increase funding for the National Endowment…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2975
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-03-23 11:02:28
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-23 11:02:28
    [post_content] => March 23, 2015

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:03

Tomorrow is Arts Advocacy Day in Washington, D.C., when arts advocates from around the country gather on Capitol Hill to urge support for the arts in federal policy. As a new legislative session begins this year, this is an excellent time to be making the case for robust funding for our priorities in Congress. If you are planning to attend, thank you for your time and efforts. If you are unable to attend, you can still participate in this important activity by reaching out to your legislators by phone or e-mail and urging them to support funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

NASAA and other arts advocacy organizations are urging Congress to fund the NEA at $155 million in fiscal year 2016. This would represent an increase of about $9 million over current funding levels. In making the case for funding, please remind your elected officials that 40% of all programmatic dollars appropriated to the NEA goes directly to state and regional arts organizations. This fact is particularly compelling to members of Congress, who are always looking for ways to connect federal funding to their districts. The federal-state partnership between the NEA and state arts agencies means that funding for the NEA has an impact in every congressional district in the country.

If you have questions, or would like information specific to your state, please do not hesitate to reach out to NASAA's research team.
    [post_title] => Advocate for Federal Arts Funding
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => advocate-federal-arts-funding
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:10:31
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:10:31
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2975
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Advocate for Federal Arts Funding

Advocate for Federal Arts Funding
March 23, 2015

Advocate for Federal Arts Funding

March 23, 2015 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:03 Tomorrow is Arts Advocacy Day in Washington, D.C., when arts advocates from around the country gather on Capitol Hill to urge support for the arts in federal policy. As a new legislative session begins this year, this is an excellent time to be making the case for robust…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2976
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-03-18 11:02:29
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-03-18 11:02:29
    [post_content] => State Arts Agencies and NASAA Urge Support for NEA before
House Appropriations Subommittee

March 18, 2015

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:02

This morning, the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies, which has jurisdiction over the budget for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), held a public hearing to consider the NEA's budget for fiscal year 2016.

I am pleased to report that NASAA and state arts agencies were well represented at the hearing. First, ArtsWA Executive Director Karen Hanan was invited to testify. In her testimony, she passionately articulated the value of the federal-state partnership and how federal investment in the NEA directly impacts state arts agencies throughout the country. The complete hearing, including Karen's testimony, will be archived and available to view once it is posted. Many thanks to Karen for making the trip (with assistance from NASAA).

In addition to Karen's in-person testimony, Ohio Arts Council Chair Jeff Rich submitted testimony, and Interim CEO Kelly Barsdate submitted testimony from NASAA, for the record. Rich's testimony underscored the value of the NEA to Ohio communities as well as state arts agencies. His remarks cited the economic benefits of the arts as well as the overwhelming citizen support of public funding for the arts. NASAA's testimony highlighted the effectiveness of combining federal and state funds to serve citizens in rural and urban communities, noting the power of the state-federal partnership to leverage additional local investments.

Upon conclusion of today's hearing, the committee is expected to begin the process of drafting the NEA's FY2016 budget, with the hope of having it available for release sometime this spring.
    [post_title] => SAAs & NASAA Urge Support for NEA at House Hearing
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => saas-nasaa-urge-support-nea-house-hearing
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:10:39
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:10:39
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2976
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
SAAs & NASAA Urge Support for NEA at House Hearing

SAAs & NASAA Urge Support for NEA at House Hearing
March 18, 2015

SAAs & NASAA Urge Support for NEA at House Hearing

State Arts Agencies and NASAA Urge Support for NEA before House Appropriations Subommittee March 18, 2015 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:02 This morning, the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies, which has jurisdiction over the budget for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), held a public hearing to consider the…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2977
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2015-02-02 11:02:30
    [post_date_gmt] => 2015-02-02 11:02:30
    [post_content] => February 2, 2015

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:01

This morning, the Obama administration sent Congress its budget proposal for fiscal year 2016. The document, which is not a formal legislative bill, serves as a blueprint for how the president would like to see Congress allocate federal funding in the upcoming fiscal year. It does not itemize all expenditures, but it does recommend appropriations for federal agencies and offers policy prescriptions on which the administration would like to see Congress act.

The president's FY2016 budget appendix recommends a funding level of $147,949,000 for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), a nominal increase over its current level of $146,021,000 (which is an increase over the president's request last year, when he proposed level funding). In submitting this request, the Obama administration states its continuing support of the NEA's Our Town program, as well as the NEA/Walter Reed Healing Arts Partnership, a collaboration with the Department of Defense bringing creative arts therapy programs to patients at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Fort Belvoir Community Hospital Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic.

Also of note, the president's budget made an identical recommendation of $147,949,000 for the National Endowment for the Humanities. The Institute of Museum and Library Services was offered a proposed increase of almost $10 million, from $227,860,000 to $237,427,957. The budget also includes level funding ($25 million) for arts education innovation programs in the U.S. Department of Education.

With the president's proposal now submitted, Congress will begin to work on the budget. Though the date has not been set yet, NEA Chairman Jane Chu is expected to testify about the agency's request before the Appropriations Committee this spring.

I will include more information about the budget in my February NASAA Notes column. If you have any questions in the meantime, please do not hesitate to get in touch.
    [post_title] => President's FY2016 Budget Recommends Modest NEA Increase
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => presidents-fy2016-budget-recommends-modest-nea-increase
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:10:46
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:10:46
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2977
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
President's FY2016 Budget Recommends Modest NEA Increase

President's FY2016 Budget Recommends Modest NEA Increase
February 2, 2015

President's FY2016 Budget Recommends Modest NEA Increase

February 2, 2015 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:01 This morning, the Obama administration sent Congress its budget proposal for fiscal year 2016. The document, which is not a formal legislative bill, serves as a blueprint for how the president would like to see Congress allocate federal funding in the upcoming fiscal year. It does…

2014

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2979
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2014-12-14 11:10:56
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-12-14 11:10:56
    [post_content] => From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 14:11
December 14, 2014

The Senate voted late Saturday to approve a budget for most federal agencies, including the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), for the remainder of fiscal year 2015. The Department of Homeland Security, the lone agency not receiving funding for the remainder of the fiscal year, had its budget approved for three months, meaning that the new Congress will need to approve funding for that agency once again in 2015.

The bill, which passed narrowly in both chambers of Congress after intense lobbying from the White House and Republican leadership, funds the National Endowment for the Arts at its current level, $146 million. The bill eliminates the line item for the Our Town program and moves the funding into the NEA's Direct Grants account.

Here is funding information on other federal agencies and programs of interest to NASAA members:
  • The Arts in Education Program at the Department of Education received level funding of $25 million for the remainder of the fiscal year.
  • The National Endowment for the Humanities received a funding level of $146 million, the same as FY2014.
  • The Institute of Museum and Library Services received an increase of $1 million, to almost $228 million.
With the budget now resolved, Congress is expected to adjourn soon for the remainder of the year. When it returns in January, Republicans will assume control of the Senate and expand their majority in the House. In my forthcoming NASAA Notes column, I will include information on the make-up of the new Congress and what we as arts advocates must do to prepare for the new year. In the meantime, feel free to contact me for more information at 202-540-9162, isaac@38northsolutions.com. [post_title] => Congress Passes Budget for Remainder of FY2015 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => congress-passes-budget-remainder-fy2015 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:16:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:16:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2979 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Congress Passes Budget for Remainder of FY2015

Congress Passes Budget for Remainder of FY2015
December 14, 2014

Congress Passes Budget for Remainder of FY2015

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 14:11 December 14, 2014 The Senate voted late Saturday to approve a budget for most federal agencies, including the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), for the remainder of fiscal year 2015. The Department of Homeland Security, the lone agency not receiving funding for the remainder of the fiscal year,…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2980
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2014-07-15 11:10:58
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-15 11:10:58
    [post_content] => House Committee Votes to Maintain Current Funding for NEA

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 14:10
July 15, 2014

In a somewhat surprising development, the House Appropriations Committee voted today to approve a budget for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at its current funding level, $146 million, for fiscal year 2015. The action comes less than a week after the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee voted to reduce funding for the NEA to $138 million.

The decision to restore funding for the NEA was made during a mark-up meeting of the full committee, where an amendment making "noncontroversial changes" was passed. Among those changes to the bill was a provision maintaining funding for the NEA at $146 million. With the bill's passage out of committee, the legislation will now be considered on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, where it is certainly possible that an amendment could be introduced to once again reduce funding for the NEA. Therefore, NASAA requests that our members take the following steps:
  • If you are represented by a member of the House Appropriations Committee (identified below), please call or e-mail their office to thank them for their vote to restore funding for the NEA.
  • If you are not represented by a member of the committee, it would still be tremendously helpful if you could reach out to your member of Congress and urge them to support the NEA's funding at $146 million when the bill goes to the floor.
It is important to note that this development could not have happened without the tremendous outreach conducted by NASAA members, as well as the considerable efforts of arts advocacy organizations. It is a demonstration of the significant impact we have as a community when joining together to work positively with Congress. A special thank-you to Ken Calvert (R-CA), the Interior Appropriations Subcommittee chair, and Jim Moran (D-VA), the ranking Democrat on the subcommittee, whose leadership was critical. If you have questions or would like additional information, please contact me at 202-540-9162, isaac@38northsolutions.com. House Appropriations Committee Republicans Harold Rogers, Kentucky, chairman Robert B. Aderholt, Alabama Martha Roby, Alabama Steve Womack, Arkansas Ken Calvert, California David Valadao, California Ander Crenshaw, Florida Mario Diaz-Balart, Florida Tom Rooney, Florida Tom Graves, Georgia Jack Kingston, Georgia Michael K. Simpson, Idaho Tom Latham, Iowa Kevin Yoder, Kansas Andy Harris, M.D., Maryland Alan Nunnelee, Mississippi Jeff Fortenberry, Nebraska Mark Amodei, Nevada Rodney P. Frelinghuysen, New Jersey David Joyce, Ohio Tom Cole, Oklahoma Charles W. Dent, Pennsylvania Chuck Fleischmann, Tennessee John R. Carter, Texas John Abney Culberson, Texas Kay Granger, Texas Chris Stewart, Utah Frank R. Wolf, Virginia Jaime Herrera Beutler, Washington Democrats Ed Pastor, Arizona Sam Farr, California Michael M. Honda, California Barbara Lee, California Lucille Roybal-Allard, California Adam B. Schiff, California Rosa L. DeLauro, Connecticut Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Florida Sanford D. Bishop, Jr., Georgia Mike Quigley, Illinois Peter J. Visclosky, Indiana Chellie Pingree, Maine Betty McCollum, Minnesota Nita M. Lowey, New York Bill Owens, New York José E. Serrano, New York David E. Price, North Carolina Marcy Kaptur, Ohio Tim Ryan, Ohio Chaka Fattah, Pennsylvania Henry Cuellar, Texas James P. Moran, Virginia [post_title] => House Committee Votes to Maintain Current Funding for NEA [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => house-committee-votes-maintain-current-funding-nea [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:16:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:16:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2980 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
House Committee Votes to Maintain Current Funding for NEA

House Committee Votes to Maintain Current Funding for NEA
July 15, 2014

House Committee Votes to Maintain Current Funding for NEA

House Committee Votes to Maintain Current Funding for NEA From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 14:10 July 15, 2014 In a somewhat surprising development, the House Appropriations Committee voted today to approve a budget for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at its current funding level, $146 million, for fiscal year 2015. The action comes…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2981
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2014-07-08 11:10:59
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-08 11:10:59
    [post_content] => House Committee Unveils NEA Budget, Plans Hearing for Wednesday

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 14:09
July 8, 2014

This morning, the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior and Related Agencies released its draft budget for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for fiscal year 2015.

In the bill, the House proposes a figure of $138 million. This figure represents a reduction in funding for the agency of $9 million from current funding. It is also significantly lower than the figure of $155 million that NASAA and other arts advocacy organizations have requested from Congress. While we are certainly disappointed in the proposed figure, it does not come as a surprise, as the House of Representatives has proposed reduced funding for the NEA in each of the past four years.

The House Appropriations Committee has also announced that it will mark up the NEA's appropriation bill on Wednesday, July 9, at 10:00 a.m. Below is a list of the members who sit on the House Appropriations Committee. If you are represented by a member of the committee, please contact their office as soon as possible and urge that they oppose the House-proposed number and instead support NASAA's $155 million request. Further, please remind them that 40% of the NEA's grant funding goes directly to state arts agencies throughout the country. A reduction in funding for the NEA would diminish the ability of these state agencies to support state and local activities such as arts education, rural arts development, creative economic development efforts and programs that make the arts more accessible to the public.

Republicans

Harold Rogers, Kentucky, chairman
Robert B. Aderholt, Alabama
Martha Roby, Alabama
Steve Womack, Arkansas
Ken Calvert, California
David Valadao, California
Ander Crenshaw, Florida
Mario Diaz-Balart, Florida
Tom Rooney, Florida
Tom Graves, Georgia
Jack Kingston, Georgia
Michael K. Simpson, Idaho
Tom Latham, Iowa
Kevin Yoder, Kansas
Andy Harris, M.D., Maryland
Alan Nunnelee, Mississippi
Jeff Fortenberry, Nebraska
Mark Amodei, Nevada
Rodney P. Frelinghuysen, New Jersey
David Joyce, Ohio
Tom Cole, Oklahoma
Charles W. Dent, Pennsylvania
Chuck Fleischmann, Tennessee
John R. Carter, Texas
John Abney Culberson, Texas
Kay Granger, Texas
Chris Stewart, Utah
Frank R. Wolf, Virginia
Jaime Herrera Beutler, Washington

Democrats

Ed Pastor, Arizona
Sam Farr, California
Michael M. Honda, California
Barbara Lee, California
Lucille Roybal-Allard, California
Adam B. Schiff, California
Rosa L. DeLauro, Connecticut
Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Florida
Sanford D. Bishop, Jr., Georgia
Mike Quigley, Illinois
Peter J. Visclosky, Indiana
Chellie Pingree, Maine
Betty McCollum, Minnesota
Nita M. Lowey, New York
Bill Owens, New York
José E. Serrano, New York
David E. Price, North Carolina
Marcy Kaptur, Ohio
Tim Ryan, Ohio
Chaka Fattah, Pennsylvania
Henry Cuellar, Texas
James P. Moran, Virginia
    [post_title] => House Committee Unveils NEA Budget, Plans Hearing for Wednesday
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-committee-unveils-nea-budget-plans-hearing-wednesday
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:16:18
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:16:18
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2981
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Committee Unveils NEA Budget, Plans Hearing for Wednesday

House Committee Unveils NEA Budget, Plans Hearing for Wednesday
July 8, 2014

House Committee Unveils NEA Budget, Plans Hearing for Wednesday

House Committee Unveils NEA Budget, Plans Hearing for Wednesday From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 14:09 July 8, 2014 This morning, the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior and Related Agencies released its draft budget for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for fiscal year 2015. In the bill, the House proposes a figure of $138…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2982
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2014-06-12 11:11:01
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-06-12 11:11:01
    [post_content] => Legislative Alert: Senate Approves Jane Chu to Lead NEA

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 14:08
June 12, 2014

This afternoon, the U.S. Senate approved by voice vote the nomination of Dr. Jane Chu to lead the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). The vote is welcome news to arts advocates, as the NEA has operated without a chair since Rocco Landesman stepped down in December 2012. With the approval of the Senate, Dr. Chu is expected to formally begin her leadership of the agency in the next few days.

Responding to the news, NASAA CEO Jonathan Katz said, "On behalf of all the state and jurisdictional arts agencies, NASAA looks forward to a collaborative and productive working relationship with Dr. Chu, and to welcoming her to the nation's capital as the new leader of the NEA."

NASAA plans to organize a collective welcome album from all states and jurisdictions, and will invite Dr. Chu to meet with state arts agency staff and council members at Assembly 2014 in New Orleans this fall.
    [post_title] => Senate Approves Jane Chu to Lead NEA
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => senate-approves-jane-chu-lead-nea
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:16:27
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:16:27
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2982
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Senate Approves Jane Chu to Lead NEA

Senate Approves Jane Chu to Lead NEA
June 12, 2014

Senate Approves Jane Chu to Lead NEA

Legislative Alert: Senate Approves Jane Chu to Lead NEA From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 14:08 June 12, 2014 This afternoon, the U.S. Senate approved by voice vote the nomination of Dr. Jane Chu to lead the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). The vote is welcome news to arts advocates, as the NEA has operated…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2983
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2014-05-14 11:11:02
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-05-14 11:11:02
    [post_content] => NEA Chair Nominee Approved by Senate Committee

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 14:07
May 14, 2014

This morning, the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee met to consider the nomination of Dr. Jane Chu to lead the National Endowment for the Arts. We are pleased to report that Dr. Chu's nomination was approved by voice vote. The senior Republican on the committee, Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN), spoke very favorably of her nomination in advance of the vote.

The HELP Committee will now forward Dr. Chu's name for consideration by the full Senate. Predicting when the Senate might vote on her candidacy is difficult; the timing is at the discretion of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV). NASAA will continue to monitor Dr. Chu's nomination and alert you when a Senate vote is planned.
    [post_title] => NEA Chair Nominee Approved by Senate Committee
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => nea-chair-nominee-approved-senate-committee
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:16:34
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:16:34
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2983
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
NEA Chair Nominee Approved by Senate Committee

NEA Chair Nominee Approved by Senate Committee
May 14, 2014

NEA Chair Nominee Approved by Senate Committee

NEA Chair Nominee Approved by Senate Committee From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 14:07 May 14, 2014 This morning, the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee met to consider the nomination of Dr. Jane Chu to lead the National Endowment for the Arts. We are pleased to report that Dr. Chu’s nomination was approved…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2984
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2014-04-25 11:11:14
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-04-25 11:11:14
    [post_content] => NEA Nomination Advancing

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 14:06
April 25, 2014

NASAA has learned that on Monday, April 28, Dr. Jane Chu, president Obama's selection to lead the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), will meet with key staff of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee. The HELP Committee has jurisdiction over the nomination of the NEA chair.

Monday's meeting is an important step in Dr. Chu's nomination process. Since she was named in February, there had been little progress on her confirmation. After Monday's meeting, members of the committee will have the opportunity to send Dr. Chu questions in writing. Should those inquiries be answered to the satisfaction of the committee members, they will meet in executive session to consider her selection. Following that vote, Dr. Chu's nomination will be forwarded to the Senate floor for a vote by the full chamber. The timing of each of these steps is uncertain, but we hope Dr. Chu's nomination will be finalized as quickly as the Senate's calendar allows.

NASAA is working with states represented on the HELP Committee to ensure that the importance of the state-federal partnership is included in the committee's conversations. We will keep members informed as the process unfolds. In the meantime, do not hesitate to contact me with questions.
    [post_title] => NEA Nomination Advancing
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => nea-nomination-advancing
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:16:43
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:16:43
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2984
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
NEA Nomination Advancing

NEA Nomination Advancing
April 25, 2014

NEA Nomination Advancing

NEA Nomination Advancing From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 14:06 April 25, 2014 NASAA has learned that on Monday, April 28, Dr. Jane Chu, president Obama’s selection to lead the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), will meet with key staff of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee. The HELP Committee has jurisdiction…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2985
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2014-04-10 11:11:16
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-04-10 11:11:16
    [post_content] => 
    [post_title] => NASAA Testimony on FY2015 NEA Budget
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => nasaa-testimony-fy2015-nea-budget
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:18:19
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:18:19
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2985
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
NASAA Testimony on FY2015 NEA Budget

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2986
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2014-04-03 11:11:18
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-04-03 11:11:18
    [post_content] => Prominent Republican Proposes Privatizing the NEA

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 14:05
April 3, 2014

On Tuesday, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI) released his budget proposal for fiscal year 2015. Like the president's budget proposal, Representative Ryan's budget, which he calls "The Pathway to Prosperity," is not a formal legislative bill but rather a set of policy recommendations.

In his proposal, Ryan calls for a $5-trillion reduction in spending over 10 years by offering changes to social welfare programs, ending government ownership of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act. Of particular concern to state arts agencies and cultural advocates, the plan also calls for the elimination of public funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

Specifically, the proposal says: "Encourage Private Funding for Cultural Agencies. Federal subsidies for the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting can no longer be justified. The activities and content funded by these agencies go beyond the core mission of the federal government. These agencies can raise funds from private-sector patrons, which will also free them from any risk of political interference."

NASAA opposes this proposal in the strongest terms possible and is advocating for funding the NEA at $155 million. It is important to note that Chairman Ryan's committee does not write the NEA's budget; that responsibility falls under the jurisdiction of the Appropriations Committee. NASAA has spoken to staff for the Appropriations Committee and has learned that there is no indication that Ryan's suggestion is under consideration.

Nonetheless, we urge you to contact your member of Congress and urge support for the NEA. NASAA's policy brief, Why Should Government Support the Arts? and our 2014 NEA Fact Sheetinclude helpful talking points about the benefits of public investments in culture.
    [post_title] => Prominent Republican Proposes Privatizing the NEA
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => prominent-republican-proposes-privatizing-nea
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:17:05
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:17:05
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2986
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Prominent Republican Proposes Privatizing the NEA

Prominent Republican Proposes Privatizing the NEA
April 3, 2014

Prominent Republican Proposes Privatizing the NEA

Prominent Republican Proposes Privatizing the NEA From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 14:05 April 3, 2014 On Tuesday, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI) released his budget proposal for fiscal year 2015. Like the president’s budget proposal, Representative Ryan’s budget, which he calls “The Pathway to Prosperity,” is not a formal legislative bill but rather…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2987
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2014-03-04 11:11:19
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-03-04 11:11:19
    [post_content] => President's FY2015 Budget Includes Level Funding for the NEA

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 14:04
March 4, 2014

This morning, President Obama released his fiscal year 2015 budget proposal to Congress. The plan proposes increasing federal spending by more than $600 billion to fund key administration priorities, including universal preschool programs, the National Institutes of Health, transportation and infrastructure projects, and climate change mitigation and research. While not completely paid for, some of the costs are offset by imposing a new tax on wealthy Americans and reducing the level of payment for health care providers under Medicaid and Medicare.

In the budget proposal, the Obama administration recommends funding the National Endowment for the Arts at $146.021 million, the agency's current funding level. Although this number is below the $155 million NASAA and other arts organizations will ask Congress for later this month during Arts Advocacy Day, we are pleased that the administration did not propose a cut in funding, given that sequestration (which statutorily lowers federal spending) remains in effect until fiscal year 2021.

It is important to remember that the president's proposal is not binding, but rather is a policy communication in which the administration identifies its priorities for the upcoming fiscal year. With the proposal released, Congress will now get to work on writing the FY2015 budget.

As this work begins, I encourage you to contact members of your House and Senate delegation and urge them to support funding the NEA at $155 million for FY2015:

A NASAA web seminar taking place March 18, Federal Budget Briefing, will inform members about details of the president's FY2015 proposal and will outline other federal issues relevant to the arts. Look for today's e-mail invitation or register now.
    [post_title] => President's FY2015 Budget Includes Level Funding for the NEA
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => presidents-fy2015-budget-includes-level-funding-nea
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:17:14
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:17:14
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2987
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
President's FY2015 Budget Includes Level Funding for the NEA

President's FY2015 Budget Includes Level Funding for the NEA
March 4, 2014

President's FY2015 Budget Includes Level Funding for the NEA

President’s FY2015 Budget Includes Level Funding for the NEA From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 14:04 March 4, 2014 This morning, President Obama released his fiscal year 2015 budget proposal to Congress. The plan proposes increasing federal spending by more than $600 billion to fund key administration priorities, including universal preschool programs, the National Institutes of Health,…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2988
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2014-02-13 11:11:21
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-02-13 11:11:21
    [post_content] => President Intends to Nominate Chu to Lead NEA

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 14:03
February 13, 2014

Yesterday, the White House announced that President Obama intends to nominate Dr. Jane Chu, president and chief executive officer of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts in Kansas City, Missouri, to lead the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

The announcement comes as welcome news to arts advocates who have been concerned about the lack of an appointment to lead the agency, which has been without a head since Rocco Landesman stepped down in December 2012. At NASAA, we're pleased that the White House has put forth a nominee to fill this important position. NASAA and state arts agency leaders look forward to working closely and collaboratively with the next NEA chairman to broaden, deepen and diversify meaningful participation in the arts throughout the United States.

The timing of a possible confirmation for Chu is unclear. Today, Congress begins a week-and-a-half-long recess. When it returns, Chu will meet privately with members of the Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions Committee, which has jurisdiction over the NEA, to discuss her vision for the agency.

Should those meetings go well, recent history indicates that her nomination could bypass a hearing by the committee and go straight to the floor for consideration by the U.S. Senate. Recent confirmations of NEA heads have taken three to four months, but because this announcement comes after most cabinet posts have been filled, it is possible that Chu could win Senate approval on a faster timetable.

NASAA will keep you informed of progress.
    [post_title] => President Intends to Nominate Chu to Lead NEA
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => president-intends-nominate-chu-lead-nea
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:17:22
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:17:22
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2988
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
President Intends to Nominate Chu to Lead NEA

President Intends to Nominate Chu to Lead NEA
February 13, 2014

President Intends to Nominate Chu to Lead NEA

President Intends to Nominate Chu to Lead NEA From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 14:03 February 13, 2014 Yesterday, the White House announced that President Obama intends to nominate Dr. Jane Chu, president and chief executive officer of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts in Kansas City, Missouri, to lead the National Endowment for the Arts…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2989
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2014-01-17 11:11:22
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-01-17 11:11:22
    [post_content] => Important Provisions in FY2014 Appropriations Bill

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 14:02
January 17, 2014

Earlier this week, NASAA alerted you to the agreement reached to fund the federal government for the remainder of fiscal year 2014. This agreement includes an appropriation for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in the amount of $146.021 million. Last night, the Senate overwhelmingly approved the legislation embodying that agreement, which had already passed in the House. As a result, President Obama is expected to sign the bill into law today.

At this point, we want to bring your attention to several provisions in the appropriations bill and related language that bear specifically on state arts agency activity.

First, the budget bill contains clarification of matching requirements for states' Partnership Agreement awards from the NEA. The law reiterates the 1:1 matching requirements for state arts agencies, noting that state matches must be comprised of nonfederal funds "directly controlled and appropriated by the State involved and directly managed by the State agency of such State." If a state requests a waiver to this matching policy, the legislation instructs the NEA chair to "give consideration to the various circumstances the State is encountering," further stipulating that waivers must be limited in duration and not granted in perpetuity. This policy reflects the consensus of numerous collaborative policy dialogues between the NEA, states and the NASAA board beginning in 2011. (Though, in 2012 and 2013, the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee had requested NEA-state consultation, approved these principles, and complimented the collaborative dialogue that produced them, this year's budget bill offered the first opportunity to ratify the agreed-upon match and waiver clarifications since 2011.)

Second, Congress has reiterated that only a state or local arts agency, or regional groups of states, can use an NEA grant to make grants to other organizations or individuals.

Third, NASAA and other arts advocacy organizations were successful in securing a separate line item in the U.S. Department of Education's budget for arts education programs. You may recall that the president's budget proposed merging arts education programs with other programs within the department, a provision not viewed as favorable by the arts community. In its budget, Congress chose not to implement this suggestion and, instead, will fund arts education programs at the NASAA-supported level of $25 million.

This year, Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) and House Appropriations Committee Chairman Rep. Hal Rodgers (R-KY) coauthored a joint explanatory statement that serves as Congress's means of directing the executive branch on how Congress would like to see the funds it is appropriating used. It includes the following:

"The bill provides $146,021,000 for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). The Committees urge the NEA to work constructively with States in developing and implementing arts education programs and priorities. . . . Any reduction in support to the States for arts education should be no more than proportional to other funding decreases taken in other NEA programs. . . ."

While not legally binding, this language conveys intent that Congress considers to be particularly important. It is the direct result of NASAA's continued, positive relationship with lawmakers in Congress, from both parties, and we are excited about working with the NEA on arts education programs and priorities this year.

Remarkably, with the negotiations relating to the FY2014 budget resolved, members of Congress are already beginning to work on the FY2015 budget. The president will give his State of the Union Address on January 28, with Congress planning hearings soon after. As always, NASAA will keep you informed and alert you with opportunities for input and action.
    [post_title] => Important Provisions in FY2014 Appropriations Bill
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => important-provisions-fy2014-appropriations-bill
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:17:28
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:17:28
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2989
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Important Provisions in FY2014 Appropriations Bill

Important Provisions in FY2014 Appropriations Bill
January 17, 2014

Important Provisions in FY2014 Appropriations Bill

Important Provisions in FY2014 Appropriations Bill From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 14:02 January 17, 2014 Earlier this week, NASAA alerted you to the agreement reached to fund the federal government for the remainder of fiscal year 2014. This agreement includes an appropriation for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in the amount of $146.021 million. Last night,…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2990
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2014-01-14 11:11:27
    [post_date_gmt] => 2014-01-14 11:11:27
    [post_content] => From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 14:01
January 14, 2014

Budget for Remainder of FY2014 Appears Near

With funding for the federal government set to expire tonight, budget leaders in the House of Representatives and Senate announced late Monday that they have reached a compromise on legislation that will fund the federal government for the remainder of fiscal year 2014. The bill provides for $1.1 trillion in funding and would reduce the scope of the automatic spending cuts known as the sequester, which remains in effect until FY2021.

Under the terms of the legislation, the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) will receive a funding level of $146.021 million. This figure amounts to what the agency would have received this year had sequestration not reduced the agency's allocation to $139 million. While this figure is lower than the one proposed by both the president and the Senate ($155 million), it is substantially higher than the dramatic decrease proposed in the House bill last year ($75 million).

To allow members of the House and Senate time to review the legislation before voting, Congress will pass at some point today another continuing resolution before it votes on the budget bill on Thursday or Friday of this week. Should Congress successfully pass the bill, it will be the first time since 2009 that Congress has approved a formal budget bill.

We at NASAA are pleased that advocates for the NEA in both chambers were able to protect the NEA from the destructive cut originally proposed in the House of Representatives. While the legislation is considered final and not susceptible to changes, we would encourage any of our members who live in states represented by members of the House or Senate Appropriations Committees to thank these legislators for their support of the NEA:

Senate Committee on Appropriations
House Committee on Appropriations

If you have any questions or would like more information about a specific issue in the bill, please do not hesitate to give me a call at 202-540-9162.
    [post_title] => Budget for Remainder of FY2014 Appears Near
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => budget-remainder-fy2014-appears-near
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:17:35
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:17:35
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2990
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Budget for Remainder of FY2014 Appears Near

Budget for Remainder of FY2014 Appears Near
January 14, 2014

Budget for Remainder of FY2014 Appears Near

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 14:01 January 14, 2014 Budget for Remainder of FY2014 Appears Near With funding for the federal government set to expire tonight, budget leaders in the House of Representatives and Senate announced late Monday that they have reached a compromise on legislation that will fund the federal government for the remainder…

2013

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2991
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-12-19 11:18:38
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-12-19 11:18:38
    [post_content] => Senate Approves FY2014 Budget Framework

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 13:12
December 19, 2013

Yesterday afternoon, the Senate voted 64 to 36 to approve the bipartisan fiscal year 2014 budget agreement negotiated last week by House and Senate leaders. The measure, which passed overwhelmingly in the House last week, was supported in the Senate by 9 Republicans along with 55 Democrats. The bill is with President Obama for his signature.

While significant, it is important to note that the legislation is not a formal budget, but only sets the parameters of federal spending levels for the remainder of FY2014. Congress now has four weeks to determine the funding levels for individual agencies before current funding expires on January 15.

For more information on the bill, please refer to the summary NASAA provided last week.
    [post_title] => Senate Approves FY2014 Budget Framework
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => senate-approves-fy2014-budget-framework
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:43:56
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:43:56
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2991
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Senate Approves FY2014 Budget Framework

Senate Approves FY2014 Budget Framework
December 19, 2013

Senate Approves FY2014 Budget Framework

Senate Approves FY2014 Budget Framework From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:12 December 19, 2013 Yesterday afternoon, the Senate voted 64 to 36 to approve the bipartisan fiscal year 2014 budget agreement negotiated last week by House and Senate leaders. The measure, which passed overwhelmingly in the House last week, was supported in the Senate by…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2992
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-12-13 11:18:39
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-12-13 11:18:39
    [post_content] => House Passes Budget Framework; Senate to Consider Next Week

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 13:11
December 13, 2013

Yesterday, the House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly (332-94) to approve a framework that hopefully will prevent another government shutdown while providing some relief from the automatic spending reductions known as sequestration. The bill now goes to the Senate, where it is expected to face stronger opposition, for consideration on Tuesday or Wednesday.

Though the bill is not a formal budget for fiscal year 2014, its passage is an important step for Congress because it sets caps on discretionary spending at $1.012 trillion for the current fiscal year. Disagreement over this cap had stalled the budget process, with House Republican leadership calling for the cap to be around $967 billion and Senate Democratic leadership calling for a figure near $1.058 trillion.

In addition to setting a budget cap, the bill provides relief from the sequester that would have reduced federal spending by about $85 billion this year. The legislation calls for a $45-billion reduction in the sequester for FY2014, to be split evenly between domestic discretionary and defense programs. The House's decision to reduce the sequester for FY2014 is significant because it means there will be less pressure on Congress to slash funding for federal agencies.

Once the budget spending cap is established, members of the House and Senate can negotiate a formal budget for the remainder of FY2014. They must do so before January 15, when funding for the federal government is set to expire. It is during this later process that funding levels for all federal agencies, including the National Endowment for the Arts, will be established.

NASAA will continue to monitor these events closely and will report back to you as soon as the Senate has voted on the measure. In the meantime, if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at 202-531-8277 or isaac@38northsolutions.com.
    [post_title] => House Passes Budget Framework; Senate to Consider Next Week
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-passes-budget-framework-senate-consider-next-week
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:44:07
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:44:07
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2992
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Passes Budget Framework; Senate to Consider Next Week

House Passes Budget Framework; Senate to Consider Next Week
December 13, 2013

House Passes Budget Framework; Senate to Consider Next Week

House Passes Budget Framework; Senate to Consider Next Week From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:11 December 13, 2013 Yesterday, the House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly (332-94) to approve a framework that hopefully will prevent another government shutdown while providing some relief from the automatic spending reductions known as sequestration. The bill now goes to the…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2993
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-11-07 11:18:41
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-11-07 11:18:41
    [post_content] => 
Congress Toils over 2014 Budget after Federal Shutdown
Isaac Brown
isaacbrown105x158On October 16, the federal government shutdown came to a close when leadership in the House of Representatives and the Senate were able to reach an agreement with President Obama. The deal provides funding for the federal government until January 15, while also providing some certainty to the financial markets by extending the nation’s borrowing authority until February 7. Perhaps the most important component of the deal is that the legislation compels leaders from the House and Senate to meet in conference to negotiate differences between the two chambers over spending levels for the current fiscal year (2014). When the House of Representatives passed a budget resolution earlier this year, it called for significant reductions in spending, while the Senate in passing its resolution proposed a combination of cuts and new taxes. The legislation ending the government shutdown requires the 29 House and Senate members comprising the conference committee to work with each other to try to reach a compromise by December 15—a compromise that both chambers hopefully can use as the basis for a formal appropriations bill to fund the government for the remainder of the fiscal year. To date, comments from committee members have not been positive, but recent history demonstrates that if there is a deal to be reached, it likely will come at the 11th hour. NASAA and other arts advocates are in close contact with our allies in Congress as these discussions continue. In its budget for FY2014, the House of Representatives proposed funding the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $75 million (the current funding level is $139 million after taking into account the mandatory cuts known as sequestration). The Senate, meanwhile, proposed an increase in funding to $155 million.  NASAA greatly appreciates the Senate's support for the NEA and is working with our allies to build support for that figure in the House of Representatives. NASAA will continue to monitor these issues closely and let you know about significant developments. In the meantime, please do not hesitate to give me a call at 202-540-9162 or email me with any questions. [post_title] => Congress Toils over 2014 Budget after Federal Shutdown [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => congress-toils-2014-budget-federal-shutdown [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-19 08:14:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-19 08:14:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2993 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Congress Toils over 2014 Budget after Federal Shutdown

Congress Toils over 2014 Budget after Federal Shutdown
November 7, 2013

Congress Toils over 2014 Budget after Federal Shutdown

Congress Toils over 2014 Budget after Federal Shutdown Isaac Brown On October 16, the federal government shutdown came to a close when leadership in the House of Representatives and the Senate were able to reach an agreement with President Obama. The deal provides funding for the federal government until January 15, while also providing some…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2994
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-10-17 11:18:42
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-10-17 11:18:42
    [post_content] => 
Congress Agrees to Three-Month Continuing Resolution; Federal Government Reopens
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:10 October 17, 2013
Yesterday, the House of Representatives and Senate agreed to, and passed, legislation reopening the federal government following a 16-day government shutdown. The measure, which passed in the Senate by a margin of 81 to 18, and by 285-144 in the House, funds federal agencies at current funding levels through January 15, 2014. The legislation also raises the debt limit, which was set to expire today, through February 7.
Speaking after the Senate's vote last night, President Obama said he would sign the legislation immediately and begin the process of reopening the federal government.  Federal employees, including those at the National Endowment for the Arts, are reporting to work this morning.
While last night's vote ends the turmoil in Washington regarding the budget and debt ceiling for the time being, it does not resolve many of the underlying issues that led to the shutdown. Negotiations are expected to begin almost immediately between leaders in the House and Senate to try to work out legislation that funds the government for the remainder of fiscal year 2014.
NASAA will continue to monitor this situation closely and keep you apprised of any developments. In the meantime, if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at 202-540-9162 or isaac@38northsolutions.com.
[post_title] => Legislative Alert: Congress Agrees on on Budget; Government Reopens [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => legislative-alert-congress-agrees-budget-government-reopens [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:44:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:44:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2994 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Legislative Alert: Congress Agrees on on Budget; Government Reopens

Legislative Alert: Congress Agrees on on Budget; Government Reopens
October 17, 2013

Legislative Alert: Congress Agrees on on Budget; Government Reopens

Congress Agrees to Three-Month Continuing Resolution; Federal Government Reopens From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:10 October 17, 2013 Yesterday, the House of Representatives and Senate agreed to, and passed, legislation reopening the federal government following a 16-day government shutdown. The measure, which passed in the Senate by a margin of 81 to 18, and by…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2995
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-10-01 11:18:43
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-10-01 11:18:43
    [post_content] => October 1, 2013
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 13:09

Federal Shutdown in Effect Today

At 12:01 this morning, October 1, federal fiscal year 2014 began without an appropriation of funding from Congress. As a result, a partial federal shutdown is now in effect. Most federal offices—including the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)—are closed. The shutdown comes after weeks of often tense negotiations between leaders in the House and Senate and President Obama over how to structure a short-term spending bill, known as a continuing resolution, failed to yield an agreement.

How long the shutdown will last is unclear at this time. Key legislators from both parties remain in Washington, and can hold a vote in short order to fund the government should an agreement be reached.

NASAA will continue to monitor this situation closely and make you aware of any developments. The NEA State & Regional office issued a memo last Friday reassuring states that current Partnership Agreement grant funds already awarded by the NEA are not in jeopardy due to the shutdown. The October 1 deadline for states applying for federal FY2014 funds remains in effect. The NEA's State & Regional office staff are furloughed and are prohibited from responding to phone calls or e-mails, but grants.gov is expected to be available on-line.

I am available to answer any specific questions you have, and can be reached at isaac@38northsolutions.com or 202-540-9162.
    [post_title] => Federal Shutdown in Effect Today
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => federal-shutdown-effect-today
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:55:44
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:55:44
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2995
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Federal Shutdown in Effect Today

Federal Shutdown in Effect Today
October 1, 2013

Federal Shutdown in Effect Today

October 1, 2013 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:09 Federal Shutdown in Effect Today At 12:01 this morning, October 1, federal fiscal year 2014 began without an appropriation of funding from Congress. As a result, a partial federal shutdown is now in effect. Most federal offices—including the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)—are closed. The shutdown…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2996
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-08-01 11:18:45
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-08-01 11:18:45
    [post_content] => August 1, 2013
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 13:08

Legislation Cutting Funding for NEA Stalls

With Congress scheduled to adjourn for the remainder of the summer tomorrow, Republican leadership in the House of Representatives announced today that it was delaying plans to hold a vote on the fiscal year 2014 Interior Appropriations bill because it did not have enough support to pass the measure. As a result, when it returns in mid-September, Congress will have only two working weeks to pass a budget before the fiscal year expires on September 30.

As we reported earlier this month, the FY2014 Interior Appropriations bill called for a 49% reduction in funding for the NEA, for a total funding level of $75 million. Responding to concerns from arts advocates from across the country, Congresswoman Nita Lowey (D-NY), the senior Democrat on the House Appropriations Committee, offered an amendment restoring funding for the NEA to its current level ($146 million). That amendment was ultimately defeated on a party-line vote of 19-27.

With so little time remaining before current funding ends, it is looking more likely that Congress and President Obama will have to negotiate another short-term continuing resolution to keep the government operating beyond September 30. NASAA will continue to monitor this situation closely and keep you apprised of any developments. My Legislative Update column in the August issue of NASAA Notes will contain further information about the decision to delay a vote on this bill.
    [post_title] => Legislation Cutting Funding for NEA Stalls
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => legislation-cutting-funding-nea-stalls
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:55:54
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:55:54
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2996
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Legislation Cutting Funding for NEA Stalls

Legislation Cutting Funding for NEA Stalls
August 1, 2013

Legislation Cutting Funding for NEA Stalls

August 1, 2013 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:08 Legislation Cutting Funding for NEA Stalls With Congress scheduled to adjourn for the remainder of the summer tomorrow, Republican leadership in the House of Representatives announced today that it was delaying plans to hold a vote on the fiscal year 2014 Interior Appropriations bill because it…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2997
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-07-22 11:18:47
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-22 11:18:47
    [post_content] => July 22, 2013
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 13:07

Today, the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior and Environment (which has jurisdiction over the budget of the National Endowment for the Arts [NEA]) released its proposed budget for fiscal year 2014. While it was expected that the House would recommend a reduction in funding for the NEA, the proposed level, $75 million, is more substantial than anticipated: almost 50% lower than the NEA's current level ($146 million). Earlier this year, the Obama administration proposed a $154.5 million budget for the NEA in its FY2014 budget request to Congress. NASAA and our fellow advocates are asking Congress to fund the NEA at $155 million in 2014—the same level of appropriations initially proposed by the Senate for FY2013.

Reflecting the somewhat unusual budget process we have experienced this year, the Interior subcommittee is planning to meet tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. to consider and approve the bill. Should the subcommittee do so, the full Appropriations Committee will meet in the coming weeks, and is expected to approve the subcommittee's funding level.

There is no date yet set for when the bill might go to the House floor, and the chances of the House and Senate being able to agree on an overall budget for FY2014 before the current fiscal year expires look increasingly unlikely. Including this week, Congress is scheduled to be in session for a total of only four weeks before the end of the fiscal year on September 30. Congress and President Obama may be forced to agree to another continuing resolution to keep the government operating.

While we think it is unlikely that the House's proposal will gain traction in either the Senate or the White House, we nevertheless view this budget as a negative development and encourage our members who have relationships with members of the House Appropriations Committee to call those offices and express their opposition to the proposed budget for the NEA before the full committee meets to consider the bill. Emphasize the benefits of NEA funding to your state. Consult NASAA's NEA Fact Sheet, which the NASAA research staff can customize for your state. Below is a list of members of the House Appropriations Committee:

Republicans
Harold Rogers, Kentucky, Chairman
C.W. Bill Young, Florida
Frank R. Wolf, Virginia
Jack Kingston, Georgia
Rodney P. Frelinghuysen, New Jersey
Tom Latham, Iowa
Robert B. Aderholt, Alabama
Kay Granger, Texas
Michael K. Simpson, Idaho
John Abney Culberson, Texas
Ander Crenshaw, Florida
John R. Carter, Texas
Rodney Alexander, Louisiana
Ken Calvert, California
Jo Bonner, Alabama
Tom Cole, Oklahoma
Mario Diaz-Balart, Florida
Charles W. Dent, Pennsylvania
Tom Graves, Georgia
Kevin Yoder, Kansas
Steve Womack, Arkansas
Alan Nunnelee, Mississippi
Jeff Fortenberry, Nebraska
Tom Rooney, Florida
Chuck Fleischmann, Tennessee
Jaime Herrera Beutler, Washington
David Joyce, Ohio
David Valadao, California
Andy Harris, Maryland

Democrats
Nita M. Lowey, New York
Marcy Kaptur, Ohio
Peter J. Visclosky, Indiana
José E. Serrano, New York
Rosa L. DeLauro, Connecticut
James P. Moran, Virginia
Ed Pastor, Arizona
David E. Price, North Carolina
Lucille Roybal-Allard, California
Sam Farr, California
Chaka Fattah, Pennsylvania
Sanford D. Bishop, Jr., Georgia
Barbara Lee, California
Adam B. Schiff, California
Michael M. Honda, California
Betty McCollum, Minnesota
Tim Ryan, Ohio
Debbie Wasserman Schultz, Florida
Henry Cuellar, Texas
Chellie Pingree, Maine
Mike Quigley, Illinois
Bill Owens, New York

Meanwhile, no date has been set for action in the Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee on a companion bill. No specifics regarding an NEA funding recommendation from the Senate are available, but NASAA certainly will advocate for a number closer to the president's proposal. (Last year, the Senate Appropriations Committee proposed a funding level of $155 million.)

NASAA will keep you informed on the progress of NEA funding through the House and the Senate.
    [post_title] => House Subcommittee Proposes Cuts to NEA Funding
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-subcommittee-proposes-cuts-nea-funding
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:56:04
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:56:04
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2997
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Subcommittee Proposes Cuts to NEA Funding

House Subcommittee Proposes Cuts to NEA Funding
July 22, 2013

House Subcommittee Proposes Cuts to NEA Funding

July 22, 2013 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:07 Today, the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior and Environment (which has jurisdiction over the budget of the National Endowment for the Arts [NEA]) released its proposed budget for fiscal year 2014. While it was expected that the House would recommend a reduction in funding for the…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 2998
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-07-18 11:18:50
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-18 11:18:50
    [post_content] => July 18, 2013
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 13:06

As you know, NASAA has been closely monitoring the efforts of members of both the House and Senate to pass legislation reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), the nation's preeminent federal education law, which expired in 2007.

Recap: Arts Policy Priorities for ESEA

Reauthorization of ESEA presents a pivotal opportunity for federal policymakers to expand the role of arts education in public school and after-school curriculums. To that effect, NASAA published a set of policy priorities we hope will be included in legislation reauthorizing the bill. Those priorities are:
  • Continuation of the arts as a "core academic subject" on par with other academic disciplines
  • Explicit inclusion of the arts in the language governing how Title I funds are used
  • Insertion of the arts and design into language identifying science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education as a priority
New Developments in the House Soon, the House of Representatives will vote on H.R. 5, the Student Success Act. The Student Success Act would authorize federal education programs and funding for five years (fiscal years 2014-2019). H.R. 5, which passed out of the House Education and Workforce Committee on a party-line vote last month (all Republicans on the Committee voted in favor; Democrats uniformly opposed), is expected to pass when it is considered by the House of Representatives later this week, despite strong opposition from House Democrats and a veto threat from President Obama. Their opposition stems from the fact that the legislation significantly reduces the role of the U.S. Department of Education in setting and maintaining standards for public schools by redirecting this authority to state education officials. NASAA Neutral on H.R. 5 NASAA recognizes and respects the fact that our membership represents a range of political viewpoints on state prerogatives and other issues. NASAA is taking a neutral position on H.R. 5 for the following reasons:
  • While the Student Success Act does not expand opportunities for arts education programs, neither does it contain any restrictions on existing opportunities. As such, we don't view H.R. 5 as a productive target for opposition advocacy at this time.
  • As we have noted in previous Legislative Alerts, the Senate has introduced and is considering legislation that embraces our policy priorities for the arts. It would be beneficial for the Senate's version of ESEA reauthorization to receive full consideration through a House and Senate conference process. However, without passage of H.R. 5 in the House, no conference process can occur, making it unlikely that ESEA reform of any kind would be considered this year.
  • By refraining from joining the divisive debate that surrounds H.R. 5, we hope to be viewed by members of Congress from both parties as an honest, bipartisan stakeholder when the final text of this legislation is negotiated. We believe that taking this approach will put NASAA and its members in the best position to advocate effectively for our policy positions.
Expect an Alternative Bill During debate of H.R. 5, Representative George Miller (D-CA), the ranking member of the Education and Workforce Committee, is expected to offer substitute legislation as an amendment to the bill. There are many provisions within this substitute amendment that we as arts advocates are very excited about, including:
  • Identifying the arts as a core academic subject, eligible for Title I funding
  • Ensuring that arts education programs receive a dedicated source of funding under the well-rounded students program
  • Including art and design in the definition of STEM program activities
This proposal represents an important affirmation for arts education policy. That is why, last month, NASAA Chief Executive Officer Jonathan Katz wrote to Representative Miller to applaud the inclusion of these provisions in the amendment, and we look forward to working with Representative Miller to promote these policies as the ESEA reauthorization process proceeds. However, like H.R. 5, the Miller proposal takes positions viewed as partisan on education policy issues that are unrelated to arts education, such as teacher evaluation. NASAA, many of our members and many of our colleagues must set our sights on the conference committee process as the mechanism most likely to achieve our desired policy outcomes. Again, we appreciate the sensitive nature of this issue and look forward to continuing to work with our membership to advance legislation in Congress that promotes arts education programs and the arts generally. In addition to monitoring the Student Success Act, NASAA is pleased to inform you that last week, the Senate Appropriations Committee moved forward a recommendation for $27 million in FY2014 funding for the Arts in Education program at the U.S. Department of Education. We will provide more information about this legislation in our next communication. As the House continues to work on these issues, please do not hesitate to contact me if you have questions, comments or suggestions. [post_title] => House to Vote on ESEA Bill [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => house-vote-esea-bill [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:56:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:56:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=2998 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
House to Vote on ESEA Bill

House to Vote on ESEA Bill
July 18, 2013

House to Vote on ESEA Bill

July 18, 2013 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:06 As you know, NASAA has been closely monitoring the efforts of members of both the House and Senate to pass legislation reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), the nation’s preeminent federal education law, which expired in 2007. Recap: Arts Policy Priorities for ESEA Reauthorization…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3000
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-07-12 11:18:53
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-07-12 11:18:53
    [post_content] => 
Despite Stalled Congress, Measures Important to Arts Community Advance
Isaac Brown
isaacbrown105-1 With the first session of the 113th Congress more than midway through its term, I thought it would be useful to reflect on the year to date. In many respects, the 113th Congress began much like the 112th concluded: with members of Congress from both parties frustrated by the lack of progress on key initiatives. Members of the House and Senate were unable to reach a compromise to prevent or mitigate sequestration, which cut the federal budget by about $85 billion for fiscal year 2013. Since that time, the Democrat-controlled Senate and Republican-controlled House have continued to fight over fiscal policy. As a result, with fewer than three months remaining in the fiscal year, work on FY2014 appropriations bills has stalled, and it appears that once again Congress will be forced to be pass a continuing resolution to keep the government operating beyond September 30. While the inaction of the federal legislature has been disappointing, June was an unusually productive month in the Senate, as the chambers took significant action on two high-profile issues. On June 29, the Senate passed by a vote of 68-32 legislation overhauling the nation's immigration laws. While the legislation is most widely known for its plan to create a pathway to citizenship for nearly 11 million undocumented immigrants currently living in the United States, it also includes an important change to federal law long sought by NASAA and other arts advocates. This provision addresses a shortcoming in current law that can result in long and unpredictable wait times for artists seeking O and P visas to perform in the United States. While current law requires the processing of applications within 14 days, lax enforcement often results in delays, in some cases as long as six months. This uncertainty has a devastating impact on performers and arts organizations throughout the country that need a reliable visa system in order to plan, promote and present performances. The Senate's immigration bill addresses this issue by requiring the Department of Homeland Security to provide expedited processing (without charging the nonprofit organization sponsoring the visa) should the 14-day waiting period be surpassed. NASAA, along with our colleagues in the arts producing and presenting fields, has long supported this legislative correction to the nation's immigration law, and worked diligently for its inclusion in the legislation. With the Senate having approved the bill, the House will now consider immigration reform. It is not clear at this time, however, whether Republican leaders there will consider the Senate bill or develop their own proposal. While the Senate was working on immigration reform, it also took steps to advance legislation reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). The primary source of federal funding for K-12 public education, ESEA has not been reauthorized since 2007. On June 11 and 12, the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee held a hearing to consider the Senate bill, known as S. 1094, the Strengthening America's Schools Act, which was introduced by Chairman Tom Harkin. The bill, which has only Democratic support and passed on a party-line vote in committee, contains several provisions important to the arts community, including:
  • Naming the arts as a core academic subject under Title I
  • Identifying the creative arts as a subject of learning in a proposed new section of the law that would address early childhood education programs
  • Categorizing music and arts programs as acceptable uses of expanded-school-day funds
While the Senate was able to pass immigration reform, the pathway for the Strengthening America's Schools Act is less clear. Senate rules require the support of at least 60 members to overcome a filibuster, which is almost certain to occur given the complexity and breadth of the bill. With Democrats holding only 55 seats, at least five Republicans will need to support the measure for it to advance. Since the bill received no Republican support in committee, the chances of the legislation getting 60 votes without considerable changes made on the Senate floor is unlikely. NASAA will continue to monitor the bill closely and will urge the House to adopt similar provisions as it considers its own bill reauthorizing ESEA. [post_title] => Despite Stalled Congress, Measures Important to Arts Community Advance [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => despite-stalled-congress-measures-important-arts-community-advance [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-18 14:47:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-18 14:47:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3000 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Despite Stalled Congress, Measures Important to Arts Community Advance

Despite Stalled Congress, Measures Important to Arts Community Advance
July 12, 2013

Despite Stalled Congress, Measures Important to Arts Community Advance

Despite Stalled Congress, Measures Important to Arts Community Advance Isaac Brown With the first session of the 113th Congress more than midway through its term, I thought it would be useful to reflect on the year to date. In many respects, the 113th Congress began much like the 112th concluded: with members of Congress from…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3001
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-06-13 11:18:54
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-13 11:18:54
    [post_content] => June 13, 2013
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 13:05

Senate to Consider Immigration Bill Amendment Important to Arts Community

Yesterday, senators Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Orrin Hatch (R-UT) announced that they were submitting their legislation, the Arts Require Timely Service (ARTS) Act, as an amendment to the immigration reform bill currently being debated in the Senate.

Amendment 1183 would fix a shortcoming in current law that results in long and unpredictable wait times for artists seeking O and P visas to perform in the United States. While current law requires the processing of applications within 14 days, lax enforcement often results in delays, in some cases as long as six months. This uncertainty has a devastating impact on performers and arts organizations throughout the country who need a reliable visa system in order to plan, promote and present performances.

Amendment 1183 addresses this issue by requiring the Department of Homeland Security to provide expedited processing (without charging the nonprofit organization sponsoring the visa) should the 14-day waiting period be surpassed.

NASAA, along with our colleagues in the arts producing and presenting fields, has long supported this legislative correction to the nation's immigration law, and urges the Senate to approve amendment 1183.

If you have any questions about the legislation, please contact me by phone at 202-540-9162, or by e-mail at Isaac@38northsolutions.com.
    [post_title] => Senate to Consider Immigration Bill Amendment Important to Arts Community
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => senate-consider-immigration-bill-amendment-important-arts-community
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:56:40
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:56:40
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3001
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Senate to Consider Immigration Bill Amendment Important to Arts Community

Senate to Consider Immigration Bill Amendment Important to Arts Community
June 13, 2013

Senate to Consider Immigration Bill Amendment Important to Arts Community

June 13, 2013 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:05 Senate to Consider Immigration Bill Amendment Important to Arts Community Yesterday, senators Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Orrin Hatch (R-UT) announced that they were submitting their legislation, the Arts Require Timely Service (ARTS) Act, as an amendment to the immigration reform bill currently being debated in the…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3002
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-06-06 11:18:56
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-06-06 11:18:56
    [post_content] => June 6, 2013
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 13:04

Senate Democrats Introduce Education Reform Bill
Committee Plans to Vote Next Week

Yesterday, Senate Democrats introduced legislation reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA, P.L. 89-10). ESEA was enacted in 1965 and is the primary source of federal funding for K-12 public education. The law was most recently reauthorized as part of the No Child Left Behind Act in 2002. Although that legislation expired in 2007, the law is still in effect, and schools that receive federal aid must adhere to its requirements.

The bill introduced yesterday, the Strengthening America's Schools Act of 2013, marks Congress's first serious effort to reauthorize the law in two years. The bill's lead sponsor is Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA), chair of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee. While Chairman Harkin had hoped to release the bill earlier, its introduction was delayed as his staff negotiated with the top Republican on the committee, Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee. Exhaustive efforts by both senators to reach an accord failed; as a result, the bill enjoys the support of 11 Democratic cosponsors and no Republicans.

While some of the bill's most controversial provisions deal with sensitive issues such as teacher evaluation and tenure, I am pleased to report that Senator Harkin's bill includes a number of provisions that the arts community supported during the last ESEA reform attempt. These include listing the arts as a core academic subject and naming the arts and music as enrichment activities in the Expanded Learning Time and Supporting Successful, Well-Rounded Students sections. The bill also amends ESEA to require states to develop core standards for key subjects such as math, reading and "creative arts" for students in kindergarten through 3rd grade. These standards are intended to bring early education programs into "alignment" with existing standards for grades 4-12, which already include the arts as key subjects.

When introducing the bill yesterday, Chairman Harkin said he plans to hold a markup of the bill in the HELP Committee next week. (Markup is when a committee meets to consider amendments and vote on passage of a bill.) This is an exceptionally fast time line for a bill of this magnitude, and indicates that he is hoping to have the Senate pass the bill before it adjourns for the August recess (tentatively scheduled to begin August 3).

Although passage in committee is all but assured (Democrats control the body by a margin of 12-10), the bill's pathway to becoming law is much murkier. While Senate Democrats control the chamber, floor rules allow any member to block a vote on the legislation by a filibuster, which requires a 60-vote margin to override. Then, should the Senate pass the bill, it will face even stronger opposition in the House, where Republican leaders plan to propose their own bill.

If you have any questions about the legislation, please do not hesitate to e-mail me or call me directly at 202-540-9162.
    [post_title] => Senate Democrats Introduce Education Reform Bill
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => senate-democrats-introduce-education-reform-bill
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:56:56
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:56:56
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3002
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Senate Democrats Introduce Education Reform Bill

Senate Democrats Introduce Education Reform Bill
June 6, 2013

Senate Democrats Introduce Education Reform Bill

June 6, 2013 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:04 Senate Democrats Introduce Education Reform Bill Committee Plans to Vote Next Week Yesterday, Senate Democrats introduced legislation reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA, P.L. 89-10). ESEA was enacted in 1965 and is the primary source of federal funding for K-12 public education. The law…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3005
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-03-01 11:19:03
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-03-01 11:19:03
    [post_content] => March 1, 2013
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 13:03

Sequestration's Effects on the NEA


Later today, the federal government will begin a process of across-the-board cuts to federal domestic and defense spending known as sequestration. The reductions are mandatory and will be phased in over the remainder of federal fiscal year 2013.

In a letter to state and regional directors, National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Director for State and Regional Partnerships Laura Scanlan confirmed that overall funding for the NEA will be reduced by 5% ($7.3 million). As you may recall, sequestration requires the Obama administration to reduce spending from all federal domestic discretionary accounts equally, while also imposing cuts to defense and certain mandatory programs like Medicare. The NEA plans to implement the sequestration cuts in the following ways:
  • Direct grant allocations will be reduced by 3.2%.
  • Partnership funds to state arts agencies and regions will be reduced by 2.7%. (The NEA is able to mitigate the effect of sequestration on states by applying funds that were de-obligated in the prior year.)
The NEA has confirmed that sequestration reductions will apply only to state arts agency grants awarded in the federal FY2013 funding cycle. Cuts will not be applied retroactively. This means that state arts agencies should expect reductions to their NEA FY2013 Partnership Agreements, used by most states to support their FY2014 activities. Current (NEA FY2012/state FY2013) Partnership Agreements will not be affected. Unfortunately, the implementation of sequestration does not mean that budget uncertainty is fully resolved for the remainder of the year. No official FY2013 budget was ever passed, and the federal government currently is running on an interim "continuing resolution" authorizing agencies to spend funds at FY2012 levels (minus the amounts now mandated by sequestration). This continuing resolution expires on March 27, and Washington is bracing itself for another budget battle. I will elaborate on the forthcoming budget debates and other relevant news in my column in the March issue of NASAA Notes. [post_title] => Sequestration's Effects on the NEA [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => sequestrations-effects-nea [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:57:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:57:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3005 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Sequestration's Effects on the NEA

Sequestration's Effects on the NEA
March 1, 2013

Sequestration's Effects on the NEA

March 1, 2013 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:03 Sequestration’s Effects on the NEA Later today, the federal government will begin a process of across-the-board cuts to federal domestic and defense spending known as sequestration. The reductions are mandatory and will be phased in over the remainder of federal fiscal year 2013. In a letter…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3003
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-02-22 11:19:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-02-22 11:19:00
    [post_content] => February 22, 2013
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 13:02

Federal Arts Education Policy Updates
I'm writing today with some congressional updates relating to federal arts education policy, as well as information on how you can help NASAA advance these efforts on behalf of all state arts agencies.

Reauthorizing ESEA

2013 is the year that Congress may take up reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). This is the set of policies that provides equitable access to education, establishes certain curriculum standards and authorizes federally funded school programs administered by states. As Congress grapples with other issues—such as deficit reduction and gun control—there is not yet a firm timetable in place for work on ESEA to commence. When it does, NASAA will be at the forefront of advocacy efforts working to ensure that:
  • the arts are named as core academic subjects for all students,
  • Title I provisions allow for the inclusion of arts activities in underserved schools,
  • the U.S. Department of Education continues its programs promoting successful arts education models, and
  • other federal agencies supporting educational programs—especially those emphasizing science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)—include the arts in their definitions and policies.
New STEAM Caucus The new congressional STEAM Caucus, led by Reps. Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR) and Aaron Schock (R-IL), has begun its work. NASAA represented state arts agencies by attending this new group's kickoff briefing, held on Capitol Hill on Thursday, February 14. The Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) is playing a leadership role in the operation of this caucus, and RISD President John Maeda addressed this gathering. NASAA CEO Jonathan Katz personally greeted and thanked each member of Congress who attended on behalf of their state arts agency. The long-term goals of this caucus are to advocate for policy changes encouraging educators and federal agencies to integrate the arts and design with STEM education. In addition to cochairs Bonamici and Schock, the membership of the caucus currently includes Reps. Jim Langevin (D-RI), Jared Polis (D-CO), David Cicilline (D-RI), Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Gerald Connolly (D-VA), Dave Loebsack (D-IA), Matt Cartwright (D-PA), Bobby Scott (D-VA), Louise Slaughter (D-NY), Tim Ryan (D-OH) and Carol Shea-Porter (D-NH). H.R. 51 Still in Committee On February 4, Rep. Langevin introduced House Resolution 51, asserting the importance of the arts and design as part of federal education policy. H.R. 51 was referred to the House Committee on Education and the Workforce and the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology. While passage of this resolution at this time is unlikely, it is still quite useful to advocates because its language frames the value of arts and design education in compelling economic and educational terms. In addition, it can serve as a valuable organizing tool, providing members of Congress the opportunity to go on record as supporting inclusion of arts education in STEM programs. Check out the full text of the bill here. What You Can Do
  • If representatives from your state have stepped forward to be part of the STEAM caucus, contact those offices and thank them for their participation and their acknowledgement of the importance of arts education as an educational and economic asset. You may also wish to encourage other members of your House delegation to participate in this caucus.
  • See if your state is represented on the House Committee on Education and the Workforceor the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology. If so, contact these members and convey your support of H.R. 51.
  • It's not too early to begin organizing your information resources in preparation for ESEA reauthorization. Although no legislation is pending currently, when action does commence it will be valuable for you to be able to share arts education success stories from your own state, especially examples that illustrate positive student outcomes from school improvement efforts that include the arts. NASAA encourages you to start gathering those examples now and to familiarize yourself with how your state is represented on the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee and the House Education and the Workforce Committee. Establish communication and build critical relationships now, so they will be in place when specific action is needed.
NASAA will keep you apprised of new developments and calls to action as the work of the 113th Congress unfolds. If you have any questions, don't hesitate to contact me. [post_title] => Federal Arts Education Policy Updates [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => federal-arts-education-policy-updates [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:57:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:57:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3003 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Federal Arts Education Policy Updates

Federal Arts Education Policy Updates
February 22, 2013

Federal Arts Education Policy Updates

February 22, 2013 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:02 Federal Arts Education Policy Updates I’m writing today with some congressional updates relating to federal arts education policy, as well as information on how you can help NASAA advance these efforts on behalf of all state arts agencies. Reauthorizing ESEA 2013 is the year that Congress…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3004
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2013-01-02 11:19:02
    [post_date_gmt] => 2013-01-02 11:19:02
    [post_content] => January 2, 2013
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 13:01

The Fiscal Cliff Vote: Implications for Arts Funding


As you are no doubt aware, on January 1 and 2, a series of tax and policy changes was set to occur that was so potentially devastating to the economy that Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke dubbed it the "fiscal cliff." Following a week of tense negotiations, the House of Representatives voted late last night to pass legislation that averts tax implications associated with the fiscal cliff while delaying other components for a few months, thereby allowing Congress more time to develop a compromise.

The legislation—which was initiated by the Senate a few days ago, passed by the House last night and signed into law today by President Obama—will permanently raise income tax rates to Clinton-era levels for families with income above $450,000 and for individuals who earn above $400,000. For all Americans who earn below those thresholds, the 2012 tax rates were extended permanently.

While the news was hailed as a significant achievement for the 112th Congress, which expires tomorrow and has been considered one of the least effective in our nation's history, we as arts advocates must be aware that several critical issues that could pose a risk to arts funding remain unsettled.

First, it is important to note that the legislation did not eliminate the across-the-board cuts in discretionary domestic spending (including to the National Endowment for the Arts [NEA]), known as sequestration, that were required under the Budget Control Act of 2011. Instead, the legislation simply delays the implementation of the sequester until March 1, 2013. The decision to delay was made because, while members of both parties agree that federal spending must be reduced significantly, they felt that the sequester was not the appropriate means for creating such cuts. The two-month extension will grant Congress and the president more time to negotiate a new mechanism for deficit reduction. By delaying the implementation of the sequester by two months, Congress once again is gearing up for a battle over federal spending and deficit reduction. This means we once again will have to be prepared to advocate aggressively for the NEA. The arts endowment could be particularly vulnerable if targeted cuts to selected discretionary spending lines come under consideration in these negotiations.

Second, two limits on tax exemptions and deductions for higher-income Americans will be reimposed: the personal exemption phaseout will be set at $250,000 and the itemized deduction limitation will kick in at $300,000. Both changes may affect charitable deductions for contributions that support cultural organizations and other charitable activities.

The 113th Congress will be sworn into office on Thursday. We soon should get a sense of how House and Senate leadership plan to address the new time line. As always, NASAA will monitor closely developments in Washington and will let you know when outreach to Congress can be most effective.
    [post_title] => The Fiscal Cliff Vote: Implications for Arts Funding
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => fiscal-cliff-vote-implications-arts-funding
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 11:57:28
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 11:57:28
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3004
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
The Fiscal Cliff Vote: Implications for Arts Funding

The Fiscal Cliff Vote: Implications for Arts Funding
January 2, 2013

The Fiscal Cliff Vote: Implications for Arts Funding

January 2, 2013 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:01 The Fiscal Cliff Vote: Implications for Arts Funding As you are no doubt aware, on January 1 and 2, a series of tax and policy changes was set to occur that was so potentially devastating to the economy that Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke dubbed it the…

2012

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3008
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2012-11-09 12:00:14
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-11-09 12:00:14
    [post_content] => November 9, 2012
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 12:14

The Fiscal Cliff and State Arts Agencies

Earlier this week, in a sweeping victory, President Barack Obama was elected to serve another four-year term. In our analysis below, we lay out what awaits Congress when it returns to session next week.

Looking Ahead
President Obama did not have much time to savor Tuesday night's victory, as a series of major tax and spending policy changes that are scheduled to occur on January 1 and 2, 2013, unless Congress acts, necessitated his quick return to Washington.

According to news reports, some of the first calls he made after being pronounced the winner were to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) and House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH), imploring them to begin negotiations to resolve the upcoming "fiscal cliff" when Congress begins its lame duck session on November 13.

Among the provisions making up the fiscal cliff are:
  • Sequestration, a provision in the Budget Control Act of 2011, which will require across-the-board cuts totaling $1.5 trillion over the next 10 years
  • Expiration of the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts, often referred to as the "Bush tax cuts" ($281 billion)
  • Expiration of payroll tax deduction ($115 billion)
  • Tax extenders—including the charitable deduction for donations ($75 billion)
  • Alternative minimum tax expansion ($40 billion)
  • Unemployment insurance expiration ($34 billion)
  • Expiration of Medicare reimbursement rates for physicians ($14 billion)
Despite this accelerated timeline, both Speaker John Boehner and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid offered sharply different interpretations of Tuesday's elections and what they mean for taxes and deficits, underscoring the significant barriers to finding common ground. Speaking shortly after Democratic control of the Senate had been assured, Reid said that he wants to increase revenue into the federal government by raising taxes on the wealthy. Boehner, on the other hand, said he is willing to raise revenue, but only by eliminating tax loopholes and not by raising rates. The comments by both are not surprising, particularly since negotiations haven't even begun yet, but aides from both sides say privately that if progress is not made in the next few weeks, it will make reaching a compromise very difficult. Implications for the Arts Because Congress is still trying to establish how it will deal with the fiscal cliff, state arts agencies must prepare for various scenarios. The least desirable outcome would be for Congress to not reach an agreement and for the sequester to begin. Should the sequester be triggered, federal agencies, including the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), will have to reduce spending by 8.2% for fiscal year 2013. This scenario would reduce Partnership Agreement funds available to state arts agencies drawn from the NEA's FY2013 budget to support states' FY2014 activities. (See http://www.nea.gov/manageaward/State-and-Regional-Handbook.pdf for more information on NEA funding and reporting cycles.) However, leaders from both parties have already stated that they view the enactment of the sequester as devastating for the economy, so there is clearly an incentive on both sides of the aisle to try to reach an agreement. It is too early to know exactly what a compromise might entail, but we expect it to include substantial cuts in discretionary domestic spending, coupled with an increase in tax rates, at least on high-income earners, as well as the elimination of some tax deductions (though I think the charitable deduction will be spared). Should this scenario play out, a cut to NEA funding is likely, though it is far too early to speculate as to extent. Another possibility is that members of Congress are able to agree only that they need more time, and rather than allowing sequestration to begin, they pass legislation delaying the start of the process. Doing this would allow newly elected members to be sworn in and would allow the president to name his cabinet appointments for the next term. It is widely believed that several key agency heads, including Secretary of the Treasury Tim Geithner and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, will announce their resignations shortly, and other cabinet officers may decide to step down as well. Since it is the agency heads that will be charged with implementing the cuts, the president may ask for more time to ensure that this process is done as smoothly as possible. In addition to dealing with the sequester in the short term, what Congress decides will have a significant impact on the FY2014 budget process. If Congress is still dealing with the sequester next year, it is very likely it would not have the time to conduct a normal budget process and would pass another short-term funding bill when current funding expires in March. In that event, the involvement of the House and Senate Interior Appropriations subcommittees—which typically have purview over NEA budget recommendations—is difficult to predict. So during the winter it will be important for arts advocates to be in good contact with not only committee leadership but also overall party leadership on both sides of the aisle to emphasize the return on investment that Congress and the states receive from the arts. Leadership Elections When Congress returns to session next week, House Republican leadership will hold its elections. Given the successful retention of its majority, it is unlikely that we will see a major shake-up in Republican leadership. John Boehner will, once again, lead the chamber, with the rest of his leadership team remaining intact. Things are less clear on the Democratic side of the aisle. Nancy Pelosi, currently the highest-ranking Democrat in the House, has chosen to postpone her caucus's election until after the Thanksgiving holiday. This has been interpreted by many to indicate that she is strongly considering stepping down from her post, and wants to give other Democrats the opportunity to wage a campaign for the top spot. If she does decide to step down, Steny Hoyer of Maryland, the second-ranking Democrat in the House, will certainly vie for the top post; but he and Pelosi have never been close allies, and it is quite possible that Pelosi will support the candidacy of one of her top lieutenants for the job. With the retirement of Representative Todd Platz (R-PA), leadership of the Congressional Arts Caucus also will change. Representative Louise Slaughter (D-NY) will remain the Democratic cochair of the Caucus, and it is incumbent upon her to invite a Republican colleague to fill Platz's position. If you know of Republican House members who would make a strong leader for this Caucus, please let us know. While this memo focuses on near-term issues, know that NASAA is laying the groundwork for long-term work with the new Congress over the next year. In addition to advocating for NEA resources, we'll be looking at policy opportunities in education and other realms that affect the work of state arts agencies and their constituents. Look for more information from NASAA on those subjects in the months ahead. [post_title] => The Fiscal Cliff and State Arts Agencies [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => fiscal-cliff-state-arts-agencies [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:06:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:06:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3008 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
The Fiscal Cliff and State Arts Agencies

The Fiscal Cliff and State Arts Agencies
November 9, 2012

The Fiscal Cliff and State Arts Agencies

November 9, 2012 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 12:14 The Fiscal Cliff and State Arts Agencies Earlier this week, in a sweeping victory, President Barack Obama was elected to serve another four-year term. In our analysis below, we lay out what awaits Congress when it returns to session next week. Looking Ahead President Obama did…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3009
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2012-09-25 12:00:34
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-09-25 12:00:34
    [post_content] => September 25, 2012
From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 12:13

Congress Passes Continuing Resolution through March 27, 2013;
Sequestration (Mandatory Cuts) Still on Schedule for January 2, 2013

After a week of tense negotiations, in the early-morning hours Saturday the U.S. Senate passed a six-month spending bill, to take effect October 1. The legislation includes a 0.6% spending increase for all discretionary programs, including the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). With the current fiscal year set to expire on October 1, lawmakers were under pressure to pass legislation before adjourning (which they did upon the bill's completion). Congress will now remain out of session until after the November elections.

There was also significant news made on September 14, when the Obama administration released its widely anticipated report on how it would implement the sequestration, the deficit-reducing mechanism enacted as part of the Budget Control Act of 2011 that requires substantial across-the-board cuts. In the report, the administration announced that in order to comply with the Budget Control Act (in other words, to cut nondefense funding by $54.7 billion in fiscal year 2013), it would have to reduce spending on domestic nondiscretionary spending accounts, including the NEA, by 8.2%. This would amount to a $12 million reduction in funding for the NEA in FY2013, which would affect NEA Partnership Agreement funds awarded for states' use in their 2014 fiscal years. It is important to note that the passage of the six-month spending bill has no impact on the Budget Control Act's 8.2% reduction slated for January 2, 2013.

The Obama administration and congressional leaders in both parties have spoken against sequestration and there is clearly momentum for altering it—if not completely repealing it. However, with the presidency and control of Congress hanging in the balance this November, do not expect any activity on this issue before the election.
    [post_title] => Congress Passes Continuing Resolution through March 27, 2013; Sequestration (Mandatory Cuts) Still on Schedule for January 2, 2013
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => congress-passes-continuing-resolution-march-27-2013-sequestration-mandatory-cuts-still-schedule-january-2-2013
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:07:03
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:07:03
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3009
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Congress Passes Continuing Resolution through March 27, 2013; Sequestration (Mandatory Cuts) Still on Schedule for January 2, 2013

Congress Passes Continuing Resolution through March 27, 2013; Sequestration (Mandatory Cuts) Still on Schedule for January 2, 2013
September 25, 2012

Congress Passes Continuing Resolution through March 27, 2013; Sequestration (Mandatory Cuts) Still on Schedule for January 2, 2013

September 25, 2012 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 12:13 Congress Passes Continuing Resolution through March 27, 2013; Sequestration (Mandatory Cuts) Still on Schedule for January 2, 2013 After a week of tense negotiations, in the early-morning hours Saturday the U.S. Senate passed a six-month spending bill, to take effect October 1. The legislation includes a…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3010
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2012-06-28 12:00:45
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-06-28 12:00:45
    [post_content] => June 28, 2012

From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 12:12

House Committee Approves FY2013 Bill with Significant Reduction in Arts Funding

On June 28, the House Appropriations Committee passed the fiscal year 2013 Interior and Environment funding bill. The bill sets funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $132 million, a reduction of $14.3 million from the current allocation of $146.3 million. In its budget proposal to Congress earlier this year, the Obama administration proposed an increase in arts spending of almost $8 million over FY2012.

The report accompanying the appropriations bill states that the Committee "values greatly the longstanding collaborative relationship between the NEA and the States. State Arts Agencies support the arts for communities at the grassroots level regardless of their geographic location, providing much of their funding to smaller organizations, community groups, and schools rather than well-established arts organizations. The Committee supports the continuation of this effective partnership and urges the NEA to work constructively with States in developing and implementing arts education programs and policies."

Looking ahead to FY2013, the Committee identified several programs for recognition, including The Big Read, Challenge America, and Shakespeare in American Communities.

The Committee also used the report to express concern that the National Council on the Arts is "playing a diminished role and urges the NEA to fully engage the Council" with regard to policy and programmatic initiatives, in addition to providing counsel to the NEA on grants.

In its report, the Committee notes that it denied the NEA's request for $3 million for expenses related to its expected move away from the Old Post Office Building in Washington, D.C. The Committee explains that it chose this course because the NEA failed to provide it with "a detailed justification" for the funds, including relocation costs. The Committee instructs the NEA to work with the General Services Administration to identify relocation options for the Committee to consider.

Interestingly, the report mentions that the NEA has operated without congressional authorization since 1993, and therefore the Committee encourages the NEA to work with Congress to renew its authorization.

Finally, the report remarks that FY2013 bill language favorable to NASAA's members addressing grant award matching requirements and waiver procedures is the direct result of "extensive collaboration and consultation between the NEA and State Arts Agencies" last year. This is due in no small measure to the tremendous work of my predecessor and the terrific network of arts advocates throughout the country.

With the Committee's approval, the bill will now go before the full House, where amendments making further cuts in funding for the arts are possible. Though no timetable has been set for consideration by the full House, NASAA will continue to update you on the bill's progress.
    [post_title] => House Committee Approves FY2013 Bill with Significant Reduction in Arts Funding
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-committee-approves-fy2013-bill-significant-reduction-arts-funding
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:07:11
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:07:11
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3010
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Committee Approves FY2013 Bill with Significant Reduction in Arts Funding

House Committee Approves FY2013 Bill with Significant Reduction in Arts Funding
June 28, 2012

House Committee Approves FY2013 Bill with Significant Reduction in Arts Funding

June 28, 2012 From: Isaac Brown, Legislative Counsel Vol. 12:12 House Committee Approves FY2013 Bill with Significant Reduction in Arts Funding On June 28, the House Appropriations Committee passed the fiscal year 2013 Interior and Environment funding bill. The bill sets funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $132 million, a reduction of…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3011
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2012-06-21 12:00:47
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-06-21 12:00:47
    [post_content] => June 21, 2012
To: State Arts Agency Executive Directors and Chairs
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 11:12

House Appropriators Vote Cut in 2013 Arts Funding;
Senate Panel Sets Slight Increase to Arts Education Budget

The Interior Appropriations Subcommittee in the House of Representatives on June 20 approved the first draft of the fiscal year 2013 funding legislation, including a cut of $14.3 million in appropriations to the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) from current funding of $146.3 million. The Obama administration had proposed an increase in arts spending to $154.255 million in the president's FY2013 budget request to Congress.

The full Appropriations Committee meeting in the House in the coming weeks is expected to approve the same funding level of $132 million in the Interior money bill. Last year, the House-passed bill would have set arts endowment funding at $135 million. For FY2013, the House measure approved by the subcommittee sets the same funding level of $132 million for the National Endowment for the Humanities.

There is no date set for when the bill might go to the House floor. Amendments to take further cuts in the arts spending should be anticipated.

No date has been set for action in the Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee on a companion bill. NASAA will keep you informed on the progress of NEA funding through the House and the Senate. NASAA and our fellow advocates are asking Congress to fund the NEA at $155 million in 2013. That's the same level of appropriations provided to the arts endowment in 2011 and the amount initially proposed by the Senate for 2012.

In action on other appropriations measures, the Senate Appropriations Committee on June 14 approved the FY2013 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education money bill, with $26.5 million for the Arts in Education innovation program of grants funded by the U.S. Department of Education. In the current fiscal year, the department is administering some $25 million in Arts in Education funds.
    [post_title] => House Appropriators Vote Cut in 2013 Arts Funding; Senate Panel Sets Slight Increase to Arts Education Budget
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-appropriators-vote-cut-2013-arts-funding-senate-panel-sets-slight-increase-arts-education-budget
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:07:21
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:07:21
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3011
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Appropriators Vote Cut in 2013 Arts Funding; Senate Panel Sets Slight Increase to Arts Education Budget

House Appropriators Vote Cut in 2013 Arts Funding; Senate Panel Sets Slight Increase to Arts Education Budget
June 21, 2012

House Appropriators Vote Cut in 2013 Arts Funding; Senate Panel Sets Slight Increase to Arts Education Budget

June 21, 2012 To: State Arts Agency Executive Directors and Chairs From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 11:12 House Appropriators Vote Cut in 2013 Arts Funding; Senate Panel Sets Slight Increase to Arts Education Budget The Interior Appropriations Subcommittee in the House of Representatives on June 20 approved the first draft of the fiscal year…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3012
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2012-05-09 12:00:51
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-05-09 12:00:51
    [post_content] => May 9, 2012

From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 10:12

Take Action: Contact Your Representatives and Senators
Urge NEA Funding at $155 Million for FY2013

2013 Appropriations Update: The House and Senate appropriations committees are beginning to draft legislation for funding across all agencies in the upcoming 2013 fiscal year. The budget allocations have been made to each of the appropriations subcommittees in both chambers. In the Senate, appropriators on the Interior Appropriations Subcommittee—with jurisdiction over funds for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)—are working with the same total spending allocation as for FY2012. In the House it's a different story, with a budget resolution that hands $1 billion less to the Interior appropriators.

In my talks with staff on Capitol Hill, it is clear that austerity measures will need to be taken in the House bill expected to go to the floor by mid-June. In the Senate, Democrats and Republicans on the appropriations subcommittee who are working together to produce a bill should be in a better position to deliver funding closer to the 2012 spending levels.

Current funding for the NEA is at $146 million, and the president's budget proposes an increase to $154.255 million. NASAA and our fellow advocates are asking Congress to fund the NEA at $155 million in FY2013. That's the same level of appropriations provided to the arts endowment in 2011 and the amount initially proposed by the Senate for 2012.

Advocacy Action: House and Senate staffers continue to advise that legislators in Congress need to hear from constituents on the budget issues. Following on the visits to Capitol Hill made by you and other advocates on Arts Advocacy Day last month, take the time now to contact your senators and representatives and speak up in support of the arts. With discretionary domestic spending at high risk from threats to slash funds and eliminate programs, your legislators in Washington need to hear from you urging their support for NEA funding.

Contact your representatives and senators now:
  • Urge your state's congressional delegation to support NEA funding for fiscal year 2013 at $155 million, the same funding level as in FY2011.
  • Let your legislators know the importance of NEA funds to assist you in your work of expanding involvement in the arts and promoting cultural opportunities for the citizens of your state, particularly at a time when arts organizations are feeling the effects of the economic downturn.
Remind your legislators of the value of public support for the arts:
  • The arts create jobs and produce tax revenue.
  • The arts play a major role in revitalizing rural areas and inner cities. The arts attract businesses and industries.
  • The arts promote cultural tourism.
  • The arts encourage imagination and critical thinking that lead to success in school.
You may contact your senators and representatives by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/ or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. Engage with your legislators at home: Advocacy begins in your own community, so take some time to develop relationships and continue communicating with your senators and representatives throughout the year. When members of Congress are home, take advantage of the opportunity to invite them to see your community programs in action. [post_title] => Take Action: Contact Your Representatives and Senators; Urge NEA Funding at $155 Million for FY2013 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => take-action-contact-representatives-senators-urge-nea-funding-155-million-fy2013 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:07:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:07:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3012 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Take Action: Contact Your Representatives and Senators; Urge NEA Funding at $155 Million for FY2013

Take Action: Contact Your Representatives and Senators; Urge NEA Funding at $155 Million for FY2013
May 9, 2012

Take Action: Contact Your Representatives and Senators; Urge NEA Funding at $155 Million for FY2013

May 9, 2012 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 10:12 Take Action: Contact Your Representatives and Senators Urge NEA Funding at $155 Million for FY2013 2013 Appropriations Update: The House and Senate appropriations committees are beginning to draft legislation for funding across all agencies in the upcoming 2013 fiscal year. The budget allocations have been made to…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3015
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2012-03-22 12:01:00
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-03-22 12:01:00
    [post_content] => March 23, 2012
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 09:12
Contact Your Senators:
Urge Support on Letter to Appropriators for NEA 2013 Increase

Senator Tom Udall (D-NM) has circulated a letter—similar to a letter initiated last week in the House of Representatives by the Congressional Arts Caucus co-chairs—inviting his colleagues in the Senate to join him in signing a letter to the leadership of the Appropriations Committee and the Interior Appropriations Subcommittee. Udall's letter urges increased funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in the coming 2013 fiscal year to the level proposed in the president's budget request of $154.255 million, up from $146 million this year.

Please contact your senators and ask them to sign the Dear Colleague letter circulated by Udall. A copy of the letter is included below.

If possible, please contact your senators before March 27.

 

March 27, 2012

The Honorable Daniel K. Inouye
Chairman
Senate Committee on Appropriations
Capitol, S=128
Washington, DC 20510

The Honorable Thad Cochran
Vice Chair
Senate Committee on Appropriations
Capitol, S=128
Washington, DC 20510

The Honorable Jack Reed
Chairman
Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment and Related Agencies
Capitol, SD=131
Washington, DC 20510

The Honorable Lisa Murkowski
Ranking Member
Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment and Related Agencies
Capitol, SH=125
Washington, DC 20510

Dear Chairman Inouye, Vice Chair Cochran, Chairman Reed and Ranking Member Murkowski:

We write to express appreciation for your continued support of the National Endowment for The Humanities (NEH) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), and to urge you to Support the President's funding request for the endowments as outlined in his Fiscal Year 2013 budget proposal. As our nation grapples with economic uncertainty, federal support for the arts and humanities is a vital economic, educational, and cultural priority that impacts communities across the United States.

The NEH is the primary source of federal support for humanities research and related activities in the United States. It provides support for professional development to scholars, educators, curators, librarians, historians, filmmakers, and more. Through the endowment's efforts, heritage is preserved, civic institutions are strengthened, and Americans are better prepared to address the challenges in a constantly changing world. In addition to appropriated funding, the NEH is able to leverage significant, non-federal contributions through competitive grant awards, with direct matching totaling more than $2 billion over the last few decades.

Federal funding for the NEH includes support for state humanities councils who work in partnership with the endowment to reach millions of Americans each year through teacher institutes, family literacy programs, and thousands of other programs. With this extensive network of state humanities councils and general NEH programming, the endowment reaches every state and territory across the nation.

For over 40 years, the NEA has provided strategic leadership and investment in the arts and has proudly expanded arts activity across the nation with the mission "to bring arts to every American." For every one dollar spent on federal arts initiatives there are eight non-federal dollars leveraged while at the same time children and communities are enriched through access to the arts that they might not otherwise have.

Federal funding for the NEA acts as seed money that generates massive economic return with the non-profit arts industry generating $166.2 billion annually in economic activity and supporting 5.7 million full-time jobs. Additionally, the federal government enjoys a direct return of $12.6 billion in income taxes, as well as the indirect benefit of improved education, community development, and increased business activity across the country.

The President's requested funding for FY13 for the NEA will help the endowment maintain its extremely successful programs, including The Big Read, Our Town, Challenge America, The Mayor's Institute on City Design 25th Anniversary Initiative, Blue Star Museums Shakespeare in American Communities, and Operation Homecoming. In FY11, the NEA awarded over $124 million in appropriated funds through just over 2,400 grants reaching all 435 congressional districts.

Thanks to your leadership, the NEH and NEA continue to play a vital role in every state. We urge you to continue to support federal funding of the arts and humanities in FY13 by adopting the President's request level for both endowments in your final appropriations legislation. We appreciate your attention to this vital funding, and look forward to working with you on this and the other important issues facing our nation.

Sincerely,
    [post_title] => Contact Your Senators: Urge Support on Letter to Appropriators for NEA 2013 Increase
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => contact-senators-urge-support-letter-appropriators-nea-2013-increase
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:07:42
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:07:42
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3015
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Contact Your Senators: Urge Support on Letter to Appropriators for NEA 2013 Increase

Contact Your Senators: Urge Support on Letter to Appropriators for NEA 2013 Increase
March 22, 2012

Contact Your Senators: Urge Support on Letter to Appropriators for NEA 2013 Increase

March 23, 2012 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 09:12 Contact Your Senators: Urge Support on Letter to Appropriators for NEA 2013 Increase Senator Tom Udall (D-NM) has circulated a letter—similar to a letter initiated last week in the House of Representatives by the Congressional Arts Caucus co-chairs—inviting his colleagues in the Senate to join him in…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3016
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2012-03-12 12:01:06
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-03-12 12:01:06
    [post_content] => March 12, 2012
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 08:12

Contact Your Representatives:
Urge Support on Letter to Appropriations for NEA 2013 Increase

Reps. Todd Platts (R-PA) and Louise Slaughter (D-NY), the bipartisan leadership of the Congressional Arts Caucus, have circulated a letter to their colleagues in the House of Representatives asking legislators to join them in signing a letter to the chair of the Interior Appropriations Committee. That letter, addressed to Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID), urges increased funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in the coming 2013 fiscal year to the level proposed in the president's budget request of $154.255 million, up from $146 million this year.

Please contact your representatives and ask them to sign the Dear Colleague letter circulated by Platts and Slaughter. A copy of both letters appears below.

Following is a list of those legislators who already have put their signatures on the letter, and those who signed a similar letter last year (FY2012) but have not done so this year. Please give special focus to contacting those who signed before and should sign again. If possible, contact your representatives by March 15.

FY2013 Current Cosigners
(Bold are new signers for FY2013)
1. Blumenauer – OR
2. Carnahan – MO 
3. Courtney – CT
4. DeLauro – CT
5. Farr – CA
6. Filner – CA
7. Alcee Hastings – FL
8. Hirono – HI
9. Holt – NJ
10. John Lewis – GA
11. Lofgren – CA
12. Maloney – NY
13. Matsui – CA
14. Michaud – ME
15. Moran – VA
16. Platts – PA
17. Polis – CO
18. Rangel – NY
19. Reyes – TX 
20. Richardson – CA
21. Slaughter – NY
22. Speier – CA 
23. Stark – CA
24. Van Hollen – MD
25. Wasserman Schultz – FL
26. Watt – NC
27. Welch – VT
28. Woolsey – CA
29. Yarmuth – KY

FY2012 Cosigners Yet to Sign on for FY2013
(of 61 total)
1. Berkley – NV
2. Berman – CA
3. Bordallo – GU
4. Brady – TX
5. Capps – CA
6. Capuano – MA
7. Christensen – VI
8. Cicilline – RI
9. Conyers – MI
10. Critz –PA
11. Davis, Danny K. – IL
12. Davis, Susan – CA
13. DeGette – CO
14. Deutch – FL
15. Dingell – MI
16. Ellison – MN
17. Engel – NY
18. Frank – MA
19. Grijalva – AZ
20. Jackson, Jesse – IL
21. Kildee – MI
22. Kucinich – OH
23. Langevin – RI
24. Loebsack – IA
25. McDermott – WA
26. McGovern – MA
27. Murphy, Chris – CT
28. Nadler – NY
29. Neal – MA
30. Pallone – NJ
31. Pascrell – NJ
32. Peterson, Collin – MN
33. Pingree – ME
34. Quigley – IL
35. Rothman – NJ
36. Schakowsky – IL
37. Waxman – CA
38. Wilson, Frederica – FL

 

Support FY13 Funding for the National Endowment for the Arts

From: The Honorable Todd Russell Platts
Sent By: kate.williamson@mail.house.gov
Date: 3/7/2012


Support the National Endowment for the Arts!
Deadline: March 15

Dear Colleague:

As co-chairs of the Congressional Arts Caucus, we invite you to join us in sending the attached letter to Interior Appropriations Subcommittee Chairman Simpson in support of increased funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

The letter asks for the President's request of $154.255 million for the NEA in the Fiscal Year 2013 Interior Appropriations bill to support the NEA's core mission to bring arts to every American. The NEA reached its peak in funding ($176 million) in 1992, and has never recovered from a 40 percent budget cut in FY 1996.

The FY 2013 request nearly restores the FY 2011 funding levels and represents an $8 million increase from the NEA's FY 2012 appropriation. In all, this figure proposes an increase of $6.7 million for the NEA's grant making over the FY2012 enacted budget, of which $2.7 million would go specifically toward state and regional arts organizations and $4 million would go directly to not-for-profit arts organizations across the country.

Continued funding for the NEA is a matter of American jobs. The non-profit arts industry supports 5.7 million full-time jobs and generates $166.2 billion in economic activity. America's arts and entertainment are also leading exports, with estimates of more than $30 billion annually in overseas sales. From the work of nonprofit arts agencies to the impact of cultural tourism, the creative sector is important to local and state economies all across the country.

The American public wants and needs an affordable investment in the arts. We urge you to join us in supporting the President's budget request at $154.255 million in the FY 2013 Interior Appropriations bill. The deadline to sign onto the letter is Thursday, March 15th. For more information or to sign onto the letter, please contact Stefanie Winzeler with Rep. Slaughter at stefanie.winzeler@mail.house.gov, or Kate Williamson with Rep. Platts at kate.williamson@mail.house.gov.

Sincerely,

 
Louise M. Slaughter Todd Russell Platts
  March XX, 2012 The Honorable Mike Simpson Chairman Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies B-308 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 Dear Chairman Simpson: We urge you to support a funding level of $154.255 million for the National Endowment for the Arts in the Fiscal Year 2013 Interior Appropriations bill to support the NEA's core mission to bring the arts to every American. The NEA reached its peak funding at $176 million in 1992, and has never fully recovered from a 40 percent budget cut in FY 1996. Thanks to your leadership, the NEA received $170 million in funding in the FY11 subcommittee markup, though the final NEA funding level in FY11 was set at $155 million before the across-the-board cut and was further reduced in FY12 to $146 million. Fulfilling the President's funding request at $154.255 million is a responsible way to utilize one our most effective and virtuous investment tools. For every one dollar we spend on federal arts initiatives we see eight non-federal dollars leveraged while at the same time enriching our children and communities with access to the arts they might not otherwise have. This level of funding for FY13 will help the NEA maintain its extremely successful programs, including The Big Read, Our Town, Challenge America, The Mayor's Institute on City Design 25th Anniversary Initiative, Blue Star Museums, Shakespeare in American Communities, and Operation Homecoming, which help the NEA reach every congressional district in the country. In FY11, the NEA awarded over $118 million in appropriated funds through just over 2,100 grants reaching all 435 congressional districts. Few other federal investments have such a widespread impact and magnifying effect across the entire nation. The NEA contributes to the development and economic growth of communities nationwide. Each year, the nonprofit arts industry generates $166.2 billion in economic activity, and provides 5.7 million full-time jobs. At the same time, this industry returns $12.6 billion to the federal government in income taxes. The National Governors Association and the U.S. Conference of Mayors recognize the enormous value of the arts in our communities and regional economies. Arts and culture-related industries provide direct economic benefits to states and communities: they create jobs, attract investments, generate tax revenues, and stimulate local economies through tourism and consumer purchases. These businesses employ 2.99 million people, representing 4.14 percent of all businesses and 2.17 percent of all employees, respectively. America's arts and entertainment are also leading exports, with estimates of more than $30 billion annually in overseas sales. From the work of nonprofit arts agencies to the impact of cultural tourism, the creative sector is important to state economies all across the country. The NEA supports life-long learning in the arts. The NEA's education programs have helped to sustain support in local communities for arts education, which has been proven to help close the education achievement gap and also benefit children and adults in many important ways throughout their lives. Students with an education rich in the arts have better grade point averages in core academic subjects, score better on standardized tests, and have lower drop-out rates than students without arts education. We strongly urge you to support NEA funding at $154.255 million in the FY13 Interior Appropriations bill. By approving this level of funding, you will maintain the NEA's ability to ensure that all Americans have the opportunity to benefit from the arts. We appreciate your attention to this request, and hope we can count on your continued support. Sincerely,  
Louise M. Slaughter, Member of Congress Todd Russell Platts, Member of Congress
[post_title] => Contact Your Representatives: Urge Support on Letter to Appropriations for NEA 2013 Increase [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => contact-representatives-urge-support-letter-appropriations-nea-2013-increase [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-18 14:46:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-18 14:46:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3016 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Contact Your Representatives: Urge Support on Letter to Appropriations for NEA 2013 Increase

Contact Your Representatives: Urge Support on Letter to Appropriations for NEA 2013 Increase
March 12, 2012

Contact Your Representatives: Urge Support on Letter to Appropriations for NEA 2013 Increase

March 12, 2012 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 08:12 Contact Your Representatives: Urge Support on Letter to Appropriations for NEA 2013 Increase Reps. Todd Platts (R-PA) and Louise Slaughter (D-NY), the bipartisan leadership of the Congressional Arts Caucus, have circulated a letter to their colleagues in the House of Representatives asking legislators to join…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3017
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2012-02-17 12:01:10
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-02-17 12:01:10
    [post_content] => NEA 2013 Budget Honors States' Role in Federal Arts Funding

February 17, 2012
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 07:12

The policy positions NASAA successfully impressed upon Congress last year are reflected in the Obama administration's fiscal year 2013 budget request for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). Last year, NASAA and state arts agencies advocated for several changes to the NEA's proposed budget to ensure that states' interests were addressed in the appropriations legislation ultimately recommended by Congress for FY2012. According to documents released this week by the NEA, and following a briefing by NEA staff for NASAA personnel on the FY2013 budget details, all four of the positions advanced by NASAA last year are reflected in the budget proposed for the year ahead.

First, in proposing an increase in funding for the NEA from the 2012 level of $146 million to $154.255 million in 2013, the NEA's proposed budget allocates the congressionally mandated 40% share of program grant funds to the states. The 2013 budget requests an increase in support for Our Town grants from a current level of $5 million to $10 million in the coming year. Dollars for that initiative are included this time in program grants, with the states' allocation applied.

Second, the budget document proposes two legislative changes: one clarifying allowed matching funds for grants made to the states, and the other providing guidance on the waive-of-match provisions for states and regional arts organizations. The language proposed in both instances is that developed by NASAA in collaboration with the NEA. As explained in the budget, the NEA had included proposed legislative changes on these issues in its 2012 request, ". . . however, based on House Congressional guidance, the NEA engaged in extensive collaboration and consultation with a diverse group of State Arts Agencies and the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies. The result of these discussions is a proposal that reflects a consensus developed from our ongoing partnerships with the States."

Third, the 2013 budget proposes that funds to the states for Poetry Out Loud and for arts education initiatives be maintained at the current levels. Last year, anticipating disproportionate reduction in these funds, NASAA advocated to focus on maintaining fair treatment for support to the states for these activities, a position backed by congressional directive in the 2012 appropriations legislation.

Fourth, the 2013 NEA budget documents provide for continued support for the National Heritage Fellowships and the American Jazz Masters Fellowships. Both were proposed for elimination in the administration's 2012 budget, but Congress directed the NEA "to continue its annual recognition of individuals with outstanding achievements in these disciplines in a similar manner to past years."

NASAA and our arts advocacy colleagues working with Congress have agreed to promote a funding level of $155 million for the NEA in 2013. That figure, which is slightly above the amount requested by the president, is identical to the arts endowment's appropriation two years ago and equal to the level proposed by the Senate appropriators going into negotiations on the 2012 budget. Later this spring, the House and Senate appropriations committees will begin their deliberations on the 2013 appropriations legislation. Bills are expected to go for floor votes in the House in June. NASAA will keep you apprised on the progress of that debate.
    [post_title] => NEA 2013 Budget Honors States' Role in Federal Arts Funding
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => nea-2013-budget-honors-states-role-federal-arts-funding
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:08:09
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:08:09
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3017
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
NEA 2013 Budget Honors States' Role in Federal Arts Funding

NEA 2013 Budget Honors States' Role in Federal Arts Funding
February 17, 2012

NEA 2013 Budget Honors States' Role in Federal Arts Funding

NEA 2013 Budget Honors States’ Role in Federal Arts Funding February 17, 2012 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 07:12 The policy positions NASAA successfully impressed upon Congress last year are reflected in the Obama administration’s fiscal year 2013 budget request for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). Last year, NASAA and state arts…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3018
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2012-02-13 12:01:14
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-02-13 12:01:14
    [post_content] => President's 2013 Budget Proposes NEA Fund Increase

February 13, 2012
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 06:12

President Obama sent his fiscal year 2013 budget proposal to Congress today, requesting an increase in funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) from the 2012 level of $146 million to $154.255 million. According to the budget documents released by the White House Office of Management and Budget, the increase in spending would be shared by program grants with some growth in administrative expenses.

In each of the first two years of his administration, the president proposed funding for the NEA at $161.315 million. For 2012, the administration's proposal would have cut the NEA funds back to $146 million, the level eventually set by Congress for the current year.

The FY2013 budget documents provide for continued support for the National Heritage Fellowships and the American Jazz Masters Fellowships. Both were proposed for elimination in the administration's 2012 budget. Funding for the Our Town initiative would also continue in 2013.

NASAA will keep you up to date as further details are made available from the NEA on the 2013 funding plans.
    [post_title] => President's 2013 Budget Proposes NEA Fund Increase
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => presidents-2013-budget-proposes-nea-fund-increase
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:08:18
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:08:18
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3018
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
President's 2013 Budget Proposes NEA Fund Increase

President's 2013 Budget Proposes NEA Fund Increase
February 13, 2012

President's 2013 Budget Proposes NEA Fund Increase

President’s 2013 Budget Proposes NEA Fund Increase February 13, 2012 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 06:12 President Obama sent his fiscal year 2013 budget proposal to Congress today, requesting an increase in funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) from the 2012 level of $146 million to $154.255 million. According to the…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3019
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2012-02-10 12:01:16
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-02-10 12:01:16
    [post_content] => 
    [post_title] => Back to the Future: Congress Begins a New Legislative Session
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => draft
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => 
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:08:33
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:08:33
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3019
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Back to the Future: Congress Begins a New Legislative Session

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3021
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2012-01-31 12:01:20
    [post_date_gmt] => 2012-01-31 12:01:20
    [post_content] => Save Arts Transportation Funds: Contact Your Representatives


January 31, 2012
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 05:12

On Thursday, February 2, the U.S. House of Representatives Transportation and Infrastructure Committee will consider new legislation—the American Energy & Infrastructure Jobs Act—to reauthorize the federal transportation programs. Among the areas this bill will cover is the Transportation Enhancement program, which since 1992 has provided funding to states that support public art projects, transportation museums, landscaping and beautification, among other transportation-related activities.

In the past, state arts agencies often have worked as partners with state transportation agencies to apply for Transportation Enhancement funds and manage projects for public art, landscaping and structural design associated with surface transportation. The program has proved to be a significant source of support for public art in particular, as well as for design and historic preservation. Those funds are threatened with elimination in the committee's drafting of the new transportation reauthorization bill.

If your state's representative is a member of the House Transportation Committee, listed here, please take a moment before Thursday morning to contact your legislator's office to reject any proposals in the transportation reauthorization legislation that would weaken or eliminate the dedicated funding that has been in place since 1992 for the Transportation Enhancement program, which has served your state.

Urge support for the continued eligibility of public art programs supported by the Transportation Enhancement provisions.

You may reach your state's representatives by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/ or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121.

House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure

Republicans
John L. Mica (FL), Chair
Don Young (AK)
Rick Crawford (AR)
Jeff Denham (CA)
Duncan Hunter (CA)
Gary Miller (CA)
Steve Southerland (FL)
Randy Hultgren (IL)
Timothy V. Johnson (IL)
Larry Bucshon (IN)
Jeff Landry (LA)
Andy Harris (MD)
Candice Miller (MI)
Chip Cravaack (MN)
Sam Graves (MO)
Billy Long (MO)
Frank Guinta (NH)
Frank A. LoBiondo (NJ)
Richard Hanna (NY)
Howard Coble (NC)
Bob Gibbs (OH)
Jean Schmidt (OH)
James Lankford (OK)
Lou Barletta (PA)
Patrick Meehan (PA)
Bill Shuster (PA)
John J. Duncan, Jr. (TN)
Chuck Fleischmann (TN)
Blake Farenthold (TX)
Shelley Moore Capito (WV)
Jaime Herrera Beutler (WA)
Thomas E. Petri (WI)
Reid Ribble (WI)

Democrats
Nick J. Rahall, II (WV), Ranking Member
Bob Filner (CA)
Grace Napolitano (CA)
Laura A. Richardson (CA)
Eleanor Holmes Norton (DC)
Corrine Brown (FL)
Mazie Hirono (HI)
Jerry F. Costello (IL)
Daniel Lipinski (IL)
Leonard Boswell (IA)
Michael H. Michaud (ME)
Elijah E. Cummings (MD)
Donna F. Edwards (MD)
Michael E. Capuano (MA)
Timothy J. Walz (MN)
Russ Carnahan (MO)
Albio Sires (NJ)
Timothy H. Bishop (NY)
Jerrold Nadler (NY)
Heath Shuler (NC)
Peter A. DeFazio (OR)
Jason Altmire (PA)
Tim Holden (PA)
Steve Cohen (TN)
Eddie Bernice Johnson (TX)
Rick Larsen (WA)
    [post_title] => Save Arts Transportation Funds: Contact Your Representatives
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => save-arts-transportation-funds-contact-representatives
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:08:38
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:08:38
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3021
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Save Arts Transportation Funds: Contact Your Representatives

Save Arts Transportation Funds: Contact Your Representatives
January 31, 2012

Save Arts Transportation Funds: Contact Your Representatives

Save Arts Transportation Funds: Contact Your Representatives January 31, 2012 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 05:12 On Thursday, February 2, the U.S. House of Representatives Transportation and Infrastructure Committee will consider new legislation—the American Energy & Infrastructure Jobs Act—to reauthorize the federal transportation programs. Among the areas this bill will cover is the Transportation…

2011

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3022
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-12-19 12:11:28
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-12-19 12:11:28
    [post_content] => December 19, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 04:12

House and Senate Pass 2012 Funding, Restate 40% State Share

On Saturday, December 17, the Senate passed by a vote of 67-32 the fiscal year 2012 appropriations legislation to carry federal funding through next September for the agencies that had been left without secure funding for the fiscal year—including the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). The day before, December 16, the House had passed the measure, 296-121, with 147 Republicans joined by 149 Democrats voting in favor of the omnibus budget bill. The bill provides $146.255 million for the NEA (and for the National Endowment for the Humanities), the same level requested by the Obama administration and above the $135 million passed by the House in August, but less than the $155 million—the 2011 spending level—approved for 2012 by the Senate Appropriations Committee in September.

The House-Senate conference report embodying the funding agreement provides details and policy directives beyond the bill's language, including a restatement of the congressional mandate to allot 40% of grant funds to the states in the budget for the NEA. Addressing the administration's budget proposal to exempt funds for the Our Town initiative from the calculation of state funding, the report says: "The conferees disagree with the proposal . . . and direct that funds be distributed based on the longstanding agreement that States receive 40 percent of all appropriated grant funds."

State partnership funds, which totaled $50.152 million in 2011 and were proposed for a cut to $44.139 million in the administration's 2012 budget, will drop with the cut in overall NEA funding to $46.139 million. NASAA's advocacy with Congress to preserve the 40% state allocation ensured that the $2 million owed to the states in the partnership grants was not lost.

Other directives in the appropriations conference report urge that funds for the Shakespeare in American Communities and The Big Read initiatives be maintained "at an appropriate funding level to allow a vibrant, competitive program to be maintained." Similarly, the report disagrees with budget positions taken by the administration to eliminate the National Heritage Fellowship program and the American Jazz Masters Fellowship program, with the expectation that the NEA "continue its annual recognition of individuals with outstanding achievements in these disciplines in a similar manner to past years."

Finally, due to the long-standing number of vacancies on the National Council on the Arts, the House-Senate conferees "encourage" the NEA to address filling those empty positions "in a timelier manner than has been the case to date."
    [post_title] => House and Senate Pass 2012 Funding, Restate 40% State Share
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-senate-pass-2012-funding-restate-40-state-share
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:28:57
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:28:57
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3022
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House and Senate Pass 2012 Funding, Restate 40% State Share

House and Senate Pass 2012 Funding, Restate 40% State Share
December 19, 2011

House and Senate Pass 2012 Funding, Restate 40% State Share

December 19, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 04:12 House and Senate Pass 2012 Funding, Restate 40% State Share On Saturday, December 17, the Senate passed by a vote of 67-32 the fiscal year 2012 appropriations legislation to carry federal funding through next September for the agencies that had been left without secure funding…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3023
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-11-01 12:11:30
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-11-01 12:11:30
    [post_content] => November 1, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 02:12

Senate Panel Approves Education Overhaul

The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee moved ahead on October 20 with the long-delayed reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) in approving a bill cosponsored by Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA), chair of the committee, and Sen. Mike Enzi (R-WY), the committee's ranking minority member. The bipartisan measure comes after more than two years of committee hearings, debate and negotiations. Significantly, the bill would eliminate current federal policies enacted in 2002 in the No Child Left Behind Act, such as the so-called "adequate yearly progress" requirements and the mandated federal sanctions for all schools that have created pressures to teach to the test.

Of relevance to arts education, the legislation would:
  • retain arts education in the definition of a "core academic subject," ensuring eligibility for the use of federal funds locally on arts education objectives and activities;
  • expand the meaning of "core academic subject" by incorporating the concept into—and thereby making the arts central to—additional federal education policies and programs within ESEA;
  • create a new program called Extended Learning to provide competitive grants to school districts to extend their school day, specifying the arts and music as among the reasons for extending the time for learning;
  • establish a competitive grant program with support for a broad range of subjects: arts, civics and government, economics, environmental education, financial literacy, foreign languages, geography, health education, history, physical education, and social studies, with an authorized funding level of $500 million. Currently, a similar set of programs is funded at a total of $265 million. The consolidated grant program was proposed by Sen. Bob Casey (D-PA) and tracks a similar proposal in the Obama administration's 2012 budget;
  • identify 10 programs of "National Significance" with a directive to the Department of Education to support "projects that encourage the involvement of persons with disabilities in the arts," presumably a reference to continuing support for VSA arts.
Harkin hopes to bring the bill to the Senate floor in December, where its prospects are uncertain. In the House, no substantive action has been taken on ESEA to mirror the bill adopted by the Senate committee. [post_title] => Senate Panel Approves Education Overhaul [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => senate-panel-approves-education-overhaul [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:29:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:29:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3023 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Senate Panel Approves Education Overhaul

Senate Panel Approves Education Overhaul
November 1, 2011

Senate Panel Approves Education Overhaul

November 1, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 02:12 Senate Panel Approves Education Overhaul The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee moved ahead on October 20 with the long-delayed reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) in approving a bill cosponsored by Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA), chair of the committee, and Sen.…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3024
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-08-09 12:11:32
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-08-09 12:11:32
    [post_content] => DEBT CEILING DEAL SPELLS DEEP CUTS IN DISCRETIONARY FUNDS

From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
August 9, 2011
Vol. 27:11

There can be little doubt about the result of the debt ceiling deal signed into law last week by President Obama. Discretionary spending will suffer mightily. President Obama has said that the deal will result in the lowest level of domestic non-defense spending since the Eisenhower administration in the 1950s.

The Budget Control Act of 2011 passed by the House and Senate increases the debt ceiling through the 2012 elections. Just as significantly, the new law creates a 12-member bipartisan commission of Senators and Representatives charged with cutting $1.5 trillion in spending cuts over ten years. The committee must complete its work by Thanksgiving this year and Congress must enact the cuts by December 23.

Everything in discretionary spending is on the table, and appropriators are initially uncertain how the recommendations of the new committee are going to interact with the appropriations process already underway. The debt limit bill sets spending caps for fiscal 2012, as well as fiscal 2013. The new law calls for trimming discretionary spending from the current $1.050 trillion level to $1.043 trillion in fiscal 2012. Since the Senate has not adopted a budget resolution, appropriators there now have the guidelines to allow them to proceed with their spending bills.

However, both sides of Capitol Hill see little chance, given the limited time, to complete all the spending bills by the start of the new fiscal year on October 1. Another continuing resolution is more likely. The objective is to avoid the kind of protracted spending negotiations that dragged on six months into the 2011 fiscal year before Congress voted an end to funding process.

Here are the highlights in the Budget Control Act:

• The bill allows a debt ceiling increase by as much as $2.4 trillion dollars in total. Included is an immediate increase of $400 billion dollars. President Obama would be permitted to request another $500 billion increase in the coming months, which Congress could vote to disallow by a veto proof two-thirds margin. A further increase of between $1.2 trillion and $1.5 trillion would be available after the special congressional committee does its work and identifies matching levels of additional spending cuts.

• Discretionary spending would be further cut by more than $900 billion over ten years. It would include security-related and non-security-related cuts. According to the Congressional Budget Office, discretionary spending would be decreased by $21 billion in 2012 and $42 billion in 2013.

• The 12-person House and Senate special committee, in addition to identifying spending cuts, could propose tax code reforms and make savings in benefit programs like Medicaid, Medicare or Social Security. Congress could not modify the committee's recommendation.

• If the special committee deadlocks or Congress rejects the committee's recommendations, automatic across-the-board spending cuts of at least $1.2 trillion would go into effect.

• The agreement requires that the House of Representatives and the Senate vote on a Balanced Budget Amendment to the Constitution, although its passage is not guaranteed.

NASAA continues to pursue our advocacy agenda focused on achieving the best results in the 2012 funding bill for the National Endowment for the Arts, with attention to policy issues of interest to state arts agencies. We are engaging our members with contacts to key legislators charged with the decision-making in the bringing a budget to conclusion for the next fiscal year.
    [post_title] => Debt Ceiling Deal Spells Deep Cuts in Discretionary Funds
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => debt-ceiling-deal-spells-deep-cuts-discretionary-funds
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:30:35
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:30:35
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3024
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Debt Ceiling Deal Spells Deep Cuts in Discretionary Funds

Debt Ceiling Deal Spells Deep Cuts in Discretionary Funds
August 9, 2011

Debt Ceiling Deal Spells Deep Cuts in Discretionary Funds

DEBT CEILING DEAL SPELLS DEEP CUTS IN DISCRETIONARY FUNDS From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel August 9, 2011 Vol. 27:11 There can be little doubt about the result of the debt ceiling deal signed into law last week by President Obama. Discretionary spending will suffer mightily. President Obama has said that the deal will result…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3025
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-07-29 12:11:33
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-29 12:11:33
    [post_content] => House Votes against NEA Funding Cuts; Strong Comeback for Arts Advocacy

July 29, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 26:11

The vote in the House of Representatives on July 28 demonstrated a strong victory for arts advocates intent on gaining legislative support for federal arts funding. The amendment offered by Rep. Tim Walberg (R-MI), a freshman in Congress and a member of the conservative Republican Study Committee (RSC), would have reduced 2012 appropriations for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) to $125 million from the level of $135 million proposed in the bill approved by the House Appropriations Committee. Walberg sponsored a similar amendment last February to bring 2011 NEA funds down to $125 million. That amendment passed by a vote of 217-209. Yesterday's vote, recorded at 181-240, defeated the Walberg amendment.

This time around, the voting patterns noticeably shifted. Even some of our champions in Congress were surprised at the size of the winning vote. In February, 22 Republicans joined all but three Democrats in voting against the arts funding cut. This week, all Democrats and 55 Republicans voted together to defeat the move to reduce the NEA funds. Conservative Republicans teamed up with moderates from their own party to carry the vote. Almost half the Republicans voting in support of the NEA's budget and against the Walberg amendment are, like Walberg, freshmen in Congress and RSC members.

Clearly, forces combined to win that outcome. The advocacy of NASAA's members was strong and engaged. Personal contacts carried the day. Our colleagues in other arts organizations were equally involved through their grass-roots networks. Our bipartisan champions in Congress stood visibly against the proposed funding cut. Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID), chair of the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee, had pledged earlier to oppose attempts on the House floor to cut the NEA budget. He was true to his word and his Democratic colleague on the subcommittee, Rep. Jim Moran (D-VA), was eloquent on the floor in defense of federal arts funding. The cochairs of the Congressional Arts Caucus played major roles during the floor debate. Rep. Louise Slaughter (D-NY) organized floor speeches with her colleagues to speak against the Walberg amendment. Rep. Todd Platts (R-PA) whipped votes against the amendment from among his Republican colleagues.

Here are the 55 Republicans who voted to hold the line on cuts to the NEA, opposing the Walberg amendment. Each of them deserves special thanks. Please let your representatives know how much you appreciate their position in support of the NEA budget and the important role the funding plays in your state.

Republicans voting against the Walberg amendment (this communication continues below the list):

Alabama
Rep. Jo Bonner
Rep. Mo Brooks

Alaska
Rep. Don Young

Arkansas
Rep. Rick Crawford
Rep. Tim Griffin
Rep. Steve Womack

California
Rep. David Dreier
Rep. Jerry Lewis

Colorado
Rep. Scott Tipton

Florida
Rep. Vern Buchanan
Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart
Rep. John Mica
Rep. David Rivera
Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen
Rep. Dennis Ross

Idaho
Rep. Mike Simpson

Illinois
Rep. Judy Biggert
Rep. Robert Dold
Rep. Aaron Schock

Kentucky
Rep. Harold Rogers
Rep. Ed Whitfield

Michigan
Rep. Thad McCotter

Minnesota
Rep. Erik Paulsen

Nebraska
Rep. Jeff Fortenberry

New Hampshire
Rep. Charles Bass
Rep. Frank Guinta

New Jersey
Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen
Rep. Leonard Lance

New York
Rep. Christopher Gibson
Rep. Mike Grimm
Rep. Richard Hanna
Rep. Nan Hayworth
Rep. Tom Reed

Ohio
Rep. Steve Austria
Rep. Steven LaTourette
Rep. Jean Schmidt
Rep. Steve Stivers
Rep. Patrick Tiberi
Rep. Michael Turner

Oklahoma
Rep. Tom Cole

Oregon
Rep. Greg Walden

Pennsylvania
Rep. Lou Barletta
Rep. Charles Dent
Rep. Michael Fitzpatrick
Rep. Jim Gerlach
Rep. Patrick Meehan
Rep. Tim Murphy
Rep. Todd Platts
Rep. Glenn Thompson

Texas
Rep. Pete Olson

Washington
Rep. David Reichert

West Virginia
Rep. Shelley Moore Capito
Rep. David McKinley

Wisconsin
Rep. Sean Duffy

Wyoming
Rep. Cynthia Lummis

The House of Representatives plans to continue meeting through the weekend to finish work on the Interior Appropriations Bill—and to produce a plan for raising the debt ceiling—but their work is done on the arts appropriations.

Many thanks again to all of you for your effective advocacy in turning around an important vote on the way to realizing the best possible budget for the NEA in 2012. Please take a moment to express your thanks to your own representatives who stood up in support of funding for the arts.
    [post_title] => House Votes against NEA Funding Cuts; Strong Comeback for Arts Advocacy
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-votes-nea-funding-cuts-strong-comeback-arts-advocacy
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:31:33
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:31:33
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3025
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Votes against NEA Funding Cuts; Strong Comeback for Arts Advocacy

House Votes against NEA Funding Cuts; Strong Comeback for Arts Advocacy
July 29, 2011

House Votes against NEA Funding Cuts; Strong Comeback for Arts Advocacy

House Votes against NEA Funding Cuts; Strong Comeback for Arts Advocacy July 29, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 26:11 The vote in the House of Representatives on July 28 demonstrated a strong victory for arts advocates intent on gaining legislative support for federal arts funding. The amendment offered by Rep. Tim Walberg (R-MI),…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3026
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-07-28 12:11:35
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-28 12:11:35
    [post_content] => House Votes against Further Cuts to NEA Funds;
Bill Sets FY2012 Arts Appropriation at $135 Million

July 27, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 25:11

Today, July 27, the U.S. House of Representatives, during consideration of the fiscal year 2012 Interior Appropriations Bill, defeated by a vote of 181-240 an amendment to take $10 million from the $135 million in the bill for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and apply the funds to a deficit reduction account, which would have set arts funding back to the 2006 level. All Democrats joined by 55 Republicans voted against the amendment to cut NEA funding. (The official roll call of recorded votes will be sent out by NASAA when it becomes available, most likely by tomorrow.)

Leading the opposition to the attempted arts spending cut, Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID), chair of the Interior Appropriations Subcommittee and manager of the bill on the House floor, called the Walberg amendment "excessive" and emphasized the "intent . . . of the National Endowment for the Arts . . . to get the arts out to the rest of America." He spoke about the value of public support for the arts in rural Idaho with the example of NEA funds to the Idaho Shakespeare Festival in Boyce, Idaho. Simpson was joined on the House floor in remarks opposing the amendment by Reps. Jim Moran (D-VA), Louise Slaughter (D-NY), Todd Platts (R-PA), David Cicilline (D-RI), Lynn Woolsey (D-CA), John Yarmuth (D-KY), Rush Holt (D-NJ), Bobby Scott (D-VA) and Betty McCollum (D-MN). There were no floor statements in support of the Walberg amendment.

Thanks to all of you for your concerted and persistent advocacy; your good work yielded an excellent result. We have had two victories in one week, having defeated an amendment on Monday that would have eliminated NEA funding altogether.

The House still must finish debate and vote final passage on the Interior Appropriations Bill. That might not happen until Friday or Saturday. Nonetheless, the provisions included in the bill before the House adopt the positions taken by NASAA and our members on issues raised in the administration's FY2012 budget proposal for the NEA:
  • The bill requires that 40% of all NEA program funds be allocated to the states, as first mandated by Congress in 1997. The administration's bill exempted funding for the Our Town initiative from the program grants; the House bill includes funds for Our Town in the program budget line.
  • The bill requires the NEA to consult with the states regarding appropriate matching funds and eligibility for waiver of match prior to the development of guidelines and rules.
  • The bill directs that funds to states for arts education not be reduced by a greater percentage than funding decreases applied to other NEA programs.
  • The bill directs the NEA to maintain the current programs of Jazz Masters and Heritage Fellowships.
The Senate must act next. We do not expect action there until after Labor Day. We got what we advocated for in the House and we hope for the same in the Senate: that the Senate bill will mirror the House bill in addressing our policy concerns, but at a higher funding level. We will continue to engage our NASAA members with those legislators who are the influential and key decision makers on the bill. Thank you to all for your dedicated advocacy. [post_title] => House Votes against Further Cuts to NEA Funds; Bill Sets FY2012 Arts Appropriation at $135M [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => house-votes-cuts-nea-funds-bill-sets-fy2012-arts-appropriation-135m [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:32:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:32:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3026 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
House Votes against Further Cuts to NEA Funds; Bill Sets FY2012 Arts Appropriation at $135M

House Votes against Further Cuts to NEA Funds; Bill Sets FY2012 Arts Appropriation at $135M
July 28, 2011

House Votes against Further Cuts to NEA Funds; Bill Sets FY2012 Arts Appropriation at $135M

House Votes against Further Cuts to NEA Funds; Bill Sets FY2012 Arts Appropriation at $135 Million July 27, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 25:11 Today, July 27, the U.S. House of Representatives, during consideration of the fiscal year 2012 Interior Appropriations Bill, defeated by a vote of 181-240 an amendment to take $10…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3027
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-07-26 12:11:37
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-26 12:11:37
    [post_content] => ACTION ALERT UPDATE
House Defeats Amendment to Eliminate NEA Funds
Continue to Ask Your Representatives on Wednesday to Vote to Defeat Further Cuts to NEA Budget

July 26, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 24:11

Yesterday evening, the U.S. House of Representatives defeated by a vote of 126-284 an amendment from the floor to eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and several other agencies. All Democrats and 105 Republicans—including all on the targeted list sent in yesterday's NASAA Action Alert Extra—voted against the amendment. The amendment was offered by freshman Rep. Tim Huelskamp (R-KS), a former member of the Kansas state senate and a member of the Tea Party Caucus in Congress.

Thanks to all for your good work. We are still awaiting a vote on an amendment introduced by Rep. Tim Walberg (R-MI) to take $10 million from the $135 million in the bill for the NEA and apply the funds to a deficit reduction account. That vote is expected to come tomorrow. Please continue to circulate our advocacy alert to your networks. We will need the votes again tomorrow (Wednesday), and they will be more difficult to gather around the vote to cut rather than eliminate.

It is essential that your representatives in the House continue to hear from their constituents to oppose further reductions in arts funding.

Points to make:
  • In the 2011 appropriations, NEA funding was reduced by $12.5 million.
  • The bill on the House floor has proposed a further reduction of $20 million in support for the arts in 2012, a 13% reduction from the current funding level of $155 million.
  • The proposed cut in arts funding is nearly twice that of the overall spending cut for other federal programs in the bill.
  • Funding to the NEA already has suffered substantial reductions.
  • The cut proposed by the House is disproportionate to overall spending reductions.
  • Vote to protect the NEA from further unwarranted and punishing cuts in funding.
  • Vote no on any proposals to reduce spending below the $135 million proposed in the bill before the House.
  • Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID), chair of the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee, will oppose any amendment to cut NEA funds below the level in the bill.
As with the vote taken last night to eliminate NEA funding, we need the votes of representatives who in the past have supported NEA funding and opposed cuts in arts appropriations. Here again is the list of your state's Republican members of the House of Representatives who have been supportive in the past (and the three Democrats who voted in favor of the earlier Walberg amendment). All of the Republicans (and two of the Democrats) listed here voted yesterday to oppose the elimination of NEA funding. This was a great victory. We need their votes a second time! You may reach your state's representatives by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/ or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. Please circulate this alert to your advocacy networks. Many thanks for your help in this effort. Alabama Rep. Robert Aderholt California Rep. Brian Bilbray Rep. Dennis Cardoza (D) – voted in favor of Walberg amendment earlier this year Rep. Jim Costa (D) – voted in favor of Walberg amendment earlier this year Rep. Mary Bono Mack Florida Rep. Vern Buchanan Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen Idaho Rep. Mike Simpson Illinois Rep. Judy Biggert Rep. Robert Dold Rep. Timothy Johnson Rep. Aaron Schock Rep. John Shimkus Kentucky Rep. Ed Whitfield Louisiana Rep. Rodney Alexander Michigan Rep. Thad McCotter Rep. Mike Rogers Rep. Fred Upton Missouri Rep. Joanne Emerson Montana Rep. Dennis Rehberg Nebraska Rep. Jeff Fortenberry New Hampshire Rep. Charles Bass New Jersey Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen Rep. Leonard Lance Rep. Frank LoBiondo Rep. Christopher Smith New York Rep. Christopher Gibson Rep. Mike Grimm Rep. Richard Hanna Ohio Rep. Steven LaTourette Rep. Steve Stivers Rep. Patrick Tiberi Rep. Michael Turner Oklahoma Rep. Frank Lucas Rep. Dan Boren (D) – voted in favor of Walberg amendment earlier this year Oregon Rep. Greg Walden Pennsylvania Rep. Charles Dent Rep. Jim Gerlach Rep. Patrick Meehan Rep. Tim Murphy Rep. Todd Platts Virginia Rep. Frank Wolf Washington Rep. David Reichert West Virginia Rep. Shelley Moore Capito Rep. David McKinley [post_title] => ACTION ALERT UPDATE--House Defeats Amendment to Eliminate NEA Funds; Continue to Ask Your Representatives on Wednesday to Vote to Defeat Further Cuts to NEA Budget [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => action-alert-update-house-defeats-amendment-eliminate-nea-funds-continue-ask-representatives-wednesday-vote-defeat-cuts-nea-budget [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:32:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:32:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3027 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
ACTION ALERT UPDATE--House Defeats Amendment to Eliminate NEA Funds; Continue to Ask Your Representatives on Wednesday to Vote to Defeat Further Cuts to NEA Budget

ACTION ALERT UPDATE--House Defeats Amendment to Eliminate NEA Funds; Continue to Ask Your Representatives on Wednesday to Vote to Defeat Further Cuts to NEA Budget
July 26, 2011

ACTION ALERT UPDATE--House Defeats Amendment to Eliminate NEA Funds; Continue to Ask Your Representatives on Wednesday to Vote to Defeat Further Cuts to NEA Budget

ACTION ALERT UPDATE House Defeats Amendment to Eliminate NEA Funds Continue to Ask Your Representatives on Wednesday to Vote to Defeat Further Cuts to NEA Budget July 26, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 24:11 Yesterday evening, the U.S. House of Representatives defeated by a vote of 126-284 an amendment from the floor to eliminate funding…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3028
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-07-25 12:11:39
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-25 12:11:39
    [post_content] => July 25, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 23:11

ACTION ALERT EXTRA
Contact Your Representatives: Defeat Further Cuts to NEA Budget

This afternoon, the House of Representatives began debate on the fiscal year 2012 Interior Appropriations Bill with votes on amendments to the bill. Already, one amendment to cut funds for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has been introduced by Rep. Tim Walberg (R-MI) that would take $10 million from the NEA and apply the funds to a deficit reduction account. A similar amendment introduced by Walberg earlier this year passed the House by a close vote.

Votes on the Walberg amendment or any other proposals to reduce the NEA's funding are not likely to come until tomorrow (July 26) at the earliest. It is essential that your representatives in the House hear from their constituents to oppose further reductions in arts funding.
Points to make:
  • In the 2011 appropriations, NEA funding was reduced by $12.5 million.
  • The bill on the House floor has proposed a further reduction of $20 million in support for the arts in 2012, a 13% reduction from the current funding level of $155 million.
  • The proposed cut in arts funding is nearly twice that of the overall spending cut for other federal programs in the bill.
  • Funding to the NEA already has suffered substantial reductions.
  • The cut proposed by the House is disproportionate to overall spending reductions.
  • Vote to protect the NEA from further unwarranted and punishing cuts in funding.
Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID), chair of the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee and floor manager for the bill, has pledged to oppose any amendments to cut NEA funds below the level in the bill. Reps. Louise Slaughter (D-NY) and Todd Platts (R-PA), cochairs of the Congressional Arts Caucus, and Jim Moran (D-VA), ranking minority member on the appropriations subcommittee, are also active in organizing opposition to further reductions in arts spending. A letter signed by NASAA and a broad range of other national cultural organizations in support of the National Endowment for the Arts has been sent to members of the House of Representatives to bolster support for preventing further cuts to the arts spending as the appropriations bill is debated on the floor. The letter was developed and organized by NASAA and our colleagues in the Cultural Advocacy Group. We need to count on the votes of representatives who in the past have supported NEA funding and opposed cuts in arts appropriations. Please make an effort to contact your state's Republican members of the House of Representatives who have been supportive in the past (and the three Democrats who voted in favor of the earlier Walberg amendment), listed below. We cannot succeed without their votes. Tell them to protect the NEA from further spending cuts and to vote no on any proposals to reduce spending below the $135 million proposed in the bill before the House. You may reach your state's representatives by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/ or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. Please circulate this alert to your advocacy networks. Many thanks for your help in this effort. Alabama Rep. Robert Aderholt California Rep. Brian Bilbray Rep. Dennis Cardoza (D) – voted in favor of Walberg amendment earlier this year Rep. Jim Costa (D) – voted in favor of Walberg amendment earlier this year Rep. Mary Bono Mack Florida Rep. Vern Buchanan Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen Idaho Rep. Mike Simpson Illinois Rep. Judy Biggert Rep. Robert Dold Rep. Timothy Johnson Rep. Aaron Schock Rep. John Shimkus Kentucky Rep. Ed Whitfield Louisiana Rep. Rodney Alexander Michigan Rep. Thad McCotter Rep. Mike Rogers Rep. Fred Upton Missouri Rep. Joanne Emerson Montana Rep. Dennis Rehberg Nebraska Rep. Jeff Fortenberry New Hampshire Rep. Charles Bass New Jersey Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen Rep. Leonard Lance Rep. Frank LoBiondo Rep. Christopher Smith New York Rep. Christopher Gibson Rep. Mike Grimm Rep. Richard Hanna Ohio Rep. Steven LaTourette Rep. Steve Stivers Rep. Patrick Tiberi Rep. Michael Turner Oklahoma Rep. Frank Lucas Rep. Dan Boren (D) – voted in favor of Walberg amendment earlier this year Oregon Rep. Greg Walden Pennsylvania Rep. Charles Dent Rep. Jim Gerlach Rep. Patrick Meehan Rep. Tim Murphy Rep. Todd Platts Virginia Rep. Frank Wolf Washington Rep. David Reichert West Virginia Rep. Shelley Moore Capito Rep. David McKinley [post_title] => ACTION ALERT EXTRA--Contact Your Representatives: Defeat Further Cuts to NEA Budget [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => action-alert-extra-contact-representatives-defeat-cuts-nea-budget [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:32:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:32:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3028 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
ACTION ALERT EXTRA--Contact Your Representatives: Defeat Further Cuts to NEA Budget

ACTION ALERT EXTRA--Contact Your Representatives: Defeat Further Cuts to NEA Budget
July 25, 2011

ACTION ALERT EXTRA--Contact Your Representatives: Defeat Further Cuts to NEA Budget

July 25, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 23:11 ACTION ALERT EXTRA Contact Your Representatives: Defeat Further Cuts to NEA Budget This afternoon, the House of Representatives began debate on the fiscal year 2012 Interior Appropriations Bill with votes on amendments to the bill. Already, one amendment to cut funds for the National Endowment…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3029
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-07-22 12:11:42
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-22 12:11:42
    [post_content] => July 22, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 22:11

ACTION ALERT
Contact Your U.S. Representatives: Register Your Support for the NEA

As early as next Monday evening, the full U.S. House of Representatives will begin votes on amendments to the fiscal year 2012 Interior Appropriations Bill, which includes funding for the National Endowment for the Arts. The House Appropriations Committee has proposed a $20 million reduction in support for the arts, a 13% reduction from the current funding level of $155 million. This is nearly twice the rate of overall spending cuts for other federal programs in the bill.

The NEA suffered a $12.5 million decrease last year. The cut currently proposed by the House is disproportionate to overall spending reductions, and amendments to reduce NEA spending even further may be offered when this bill comes to a vote.

Please contact your state's members of the House of Representatives. Tell them to protect the NEA from further spending cuts and to vote no on any proposals to reduce spending below the $135 million proposed in the bill before the House.

As Congress seeks further reductions in spending across the federal budget, it is essential that your elected officials understand the public value of direct federal support for the arts. Given the current economic strain on all funding sources, NEA funding is critical in supporting the work of state arts agencies, arts organizations, and national research and leadership initiatives. See the Advocacy Tools section of NASAA's website for helpful talking points.

You may reach your state's representatives by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/ or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121.

Thank you for taking action to support advocacy on behalf of federal arts funding.
    [post_title] => ACTION ALERT: Contact Your U.S. Representatives; Register Your Support for the NEA
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => action-alert-contact-u-s-representatives-register-support-nea
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:33:12
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:33:12
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3029
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
ACTION ALERT: Contact Your U.S. Representatives; Register Your Support for the NEA

ACTION ALERT: Contact Your U.S. Representatives; Register Your Support for the NEA
July 22, 2011

ACTION ALERT: Contact Your U.S. Representatives; Register Your Support for the NEA

July 22, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 22:11 ACTION ALERT Contact Your U.S. Representatives: Register Your Support for the NEA As early as next Monday evening, the full U.S. House of Representatives will begin votes on amendments to the fiscal year 2012 Interior Appropriations Bill, which includes funding for the National Endowment for…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3030
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-07-13 12:11:44
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-13 12:11:44
    [post_content] => House Appropriators Approve NEA at $135 Million in FY2012
Committee Honors 40% Share to States

July 13, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 21:11

The House Appropriations Committee late last night (July 12) approved the fiscal year 2012 Interior Appropriations Bill drafted by the Interior Subcommittee last week, setting spending for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $135 million, $20 million below current 2011 funding. The NEA total appropriation at $135 million allocates $46 million to states from total program funds of $108.2 million. The proposed state funding represents a loss of $3.85 million from 2011 support.

The Committee rejected the administration's budget proposal to exempt the Our Town initiative from the 40% share of program dollars required for allocation to the states. Direct grants for program funds total $62.2 million, including $2 million for Our Town (down from $5 million proposed by the administration as a separate program line).

The Committee's report accompanying the appropriations bill states, "The Committee is particularly concerned that funding for this program [Our Town] would gravitate toward large urban centers with strong existing arts infrastructures at the expense of State Arts Agencies [SAAs] which are better positioned to reach underserved populations. This precedent could undermine support not only for SAAs but for the NEA more broadly."

The report goes on to praise the NEA-SAA "long-standing collaborative relationship" as a "widely supported successful model" which "the Committee values greatly." The report explains that the allocation to the states of 40% of NEA program funds was established by Congress in 1997 "because they [state arts agencies] understand community priorities and are accessible to local arts organizations." Indeed, Our Town is viewed in the report as more properly aligned with the goals of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Special mention is made of the Big Read, to be funded at $3 million, and Shakespeare in American Communities, at $2 million, both of which the Committee cites "among the most cost-effective grant programs with broad, bipartisan congressional support" meeting the NEA's goals of "extending the arts to underserved populations in both urban and rural communities across the United States."

The Committee rejected the administration's proposal to eliminate the National Heritage and Jazz Masters awards with the direction that the NEA "continue these popular honorific fellowships in the same manner as it has in the past." The proposed American Artist of the Year award was similarly rejected as "an attempt to circumvent clear, long-established congressional guidelines" prohibiting direct grants to individual artists.

The Committee did not include legislative changes proposed by the administration on clarifying state match and waiver of match provisions for states and regions. According to the Committee's report, the proposals are viewed as "generally reasonable and desirable, provided some flexibility is provided to the States," but they "should not be adopted without the full consultation and active participation of State Arts Agencies. Anything less would result in a Federal mandate that could, in some instances, prove difficult for States in the future. Therefore, the Committee directs the NEA to engage in a collaborative process, building upon its longstanding partnership with diverse State Arts Agencies, to fashion clarifying bill language for consideration by the Committee addressing matching requirements and waiver procedures."

The NEA's administrative funds, which, according to the Committee report, have risen by 17% since 2008, would be reduced by almost 9% over current budget. The administration had requested a 2% increase in administrative support. The Appropriations Committee also "urges" the NEA to cap full-time employees in 2012 at the 2008 level of 155, a cut from current numbers.

The Interior Appropriations Bill could go to the House floor as early as next week, although no date has been set for floor action. Similarly, no time has been announced for the Senate Appropriations Committee to begin formal work on drafting its version of the legislation.

NASAA will keep you informed as the process continues. Thank you for your advocacy support in the development of 2012 appropriations for the NEA.
    [post_title] => House Appropriators Approve NEA at $135 Million in FY2012; Committee Honors 40% Share to States
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-appropriators-approve-nea-135-million-fy2012-committee-honors-40-share-states
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:33:34
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:33:34
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3030
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Appropriators Approve NEA at $135 Million in FY2012; Committee Honors 40% Share to States

House Appropriators Approve NEA at $135 Million in FY2012; Committee Honors 40% Share to States
July 13, 2011

House Appropriators Approve NEA at $135 Million in FY2012; Committee Honors 40% Share to States

House Appropriators Approve NEA at $135 Million in FY2012 Committee Honors 40% Share to States July 13, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 21:11 The House Appropriations Committee late last night (July 12) approved the fiscal year 2012 Interior Appropriations Bill drafted by the Interior Subcommittee last week, setting spending for the National Endowment…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3031
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-07-08 12:11:47
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-08 12:11:47
    [post_content] => July 8, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 20:11

Contact House Appropriators: Protect NEA Funds from Further Cuts

The House Appropriations Committee is scheduled to meet on Tuesday, July 12, to vote on the draft of the fiscal year 2012 Interior Appropriations Bill approved this week by the subcommittee. The bill sets spending for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $135 million, a decrease of $20 million from 2011 funding, and $11 million below President Obama's budget request for 2012. The bill was passed by the subcommittee on a party-line vote, 8-5.

The cut to the NEA's funding of 13% proposed by the House subcommittee is disproportionate to the overall reduction of 7% in funds for the total Interior Appropriations Bill. Although no further cuts have been proposed, we need to be vigilant about the possibility that an amendment could be offered at the committee meeting on Tuesday to reduce NEA appropriations even further.

If your representative sits on this committee, NOW is the time to call and urge a vote to OPPOSE any cuts to the NEA. You may reach your state's representatives by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/ or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121.

Key to a successful defeat of any amendment to cut NEA funds in the Appropriations Committee are the votes of Republicans who in the past have voted against cuts in NEA funding, highlighted below in bold. PLEASE be sure to contact these legislators and urge others in your state to do the same before Tuesday morning, July 12.

House Appropriations Committee

Republicans
Harold Rogers, Kentucky, Chairman
C.W. Bill Young, Florida
Jerry Lewis, California
Frank R. Wolf, Virginia 
Jack Kingston, Georgia
Rodney P. Frelinghuysen, New Jersey 
Tom Latham, Iowa
Robert B. Aderholt, Alabama
Jo Ann Emerson, Missouri 
Kay Granger, Texas
Michael K. Simpson, Idaho 
John Abney Culberson, Texas
Ander Crenshaw, Florida
Denny Rehberg, Montana 
John R. Carter, Texas
Rodney Alexander, Louisiana 
Ken Calvert, California
Jo Bonner, Alabama
Steven C. LaTourette, Ohio 
Tom Cole, Oklahoma
Jeff Flake, Arizona
Mario Diaz-Balart, Florida
Charles W. Dent, Pennsylvania 
Steve Austria, Ohio
Cynthia M. Lummis, Wyoming
Tom Graves, Georgia
Kevin Yoder, Kansas
Steve Womack, Arkansas
Alan Nunnelee, Mississippi

Democrats
Norman D. Dicks, Washington, Ranking Member
Marcy Kaptur, Ohio
Peter J. Visclosky, Indiana
Nita M. Lowey, New York
José E. Serrano, New York
Rosa L. DeLauro, Connecticut
James P. Moran, Virginia
John W. Olver, Massachusetts
Ed Pastor, Arizona
David E. Price, North Carolina
Maurice D. Hinchey, New York
Lucille Roybal-Allard, California
Sam Farr, California
Jesse L. Jackson, Jr., Illinois
Chaka Fattah, Pennsylvania
Steven R. Rothman, New Jersey
Sanford D. Bishop, Jr., Georgia
Barbara Lee, California
Adam B. Schiff, California
Michael M. Honda, California
Betty McCollum, Minnesota
    [post_title] => Contact House Appropriators: Protect NEA Funds from Further Cuts
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => contact-house-appropriators-protect-nea-funds-cuts
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:33:43
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:33:43
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3031
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Contact House Appropriators: Protect NEA Funds from Further Cuts

Contact House Appropriators: Protect NEA Funds from Further Cuts
July 8, 2011

Contact House Appropriators: Protect NEA Funds from Further Cuts

July 8, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 20:11 Contact House Appropriators: Protect NEA Funds from Further Cuts The House Appropriations Committee is scheduled to meet on Tuesday, July 12, to vote on the draft of the fiscal year 2012 Interior Appropriations Bill approved this week by the subcommittee. The bill sets spending for…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3033
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-07-06 12:11:50
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-07-06 12:11:50
    [post_content] => House Draft Bill to Set NEA Funds at $135 Million in 2012

July 6, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 19:11

In advance of the scheduled markup session of the Interior Appropriations Subcommittee in the U.S. House of Representatives set for July 7, documents have been posted with the draft fiscal year 2012 Interior Appropriations Bill setting spending for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $135 million, a decrease of $20 million from FY2011 funding that puts the arts appropriation somewhere between levels last seen in 2007 and 2008.

There are no details yet on how the Subcommittee intends to treat the issue of guaranteeing that states receive the mandated allocation of 40% of the NEA's program funds. The administration had proposed holding $5 million for the Our Town initiative exempt from the allocation to state arts agencies. More details on the bill and the committee's position will become available after the markup session.

The Interior Appropriations Bill proposed by the House subcommittee would cut from programs under its jurisdiction more than $2 billion in discretionary funds compared with 2011 spending levels. The only notable increases would occur in funding for wildfire control and the Indian Health Service.
    [post_title] => House Draft Bill to Set NEA Funds at $135 Million in 2012
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-draft-bill-set-nea-funds-135-million-2012
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:33:51
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:33:51
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3033
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Draft Bill to Set NEA Funds at $135 Million in 2012

House Draft Bill to Set NEA Funds at $135 Million in 2012
July 6, 2011

House Draft Bill to Set NEA Funds at $135 Million in 2012

House Draft Bill to Set NEA Funds at $135 Million in 2012 July 6, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 19:11 In advance of the scheduled markup session of the Interior Appropriations Subcommittee in the U.S. House of Representatives set for July 7, documents have been posted with the draft fiscal year 2012 Interior…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3034
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-06-24 12:12:04
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-06-24 12:12:04
    [post_content] => House Set to Draft Arts Funding Bill
TAKE ACTION: Contact Your Representatives
Urge NEA Funding at $167.5 Million, Maintain 40% to States

June 24, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 18:11

The Interior Appropriations Subcommittee in the House of Representatives is scheduled on July 6 to vote on the first draft of a spending bill for fiscal year 2012 to include funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). This is a key vote. Action taken by this subcommittee will set the direction for consideration of NEA funding this year in Congress.

If your state is represented by any of the members of the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee listed here, please contact them and urge their support for funding at the 2010 level of $167.5 million, and insist that the legislation maintain 40% of ALL program funds for allocation to the states.

Members of Congress from both parties tell us that they need to hear from constituents about the value of federal funding for the arts. This year in particular, when discretionary domestic funding is at high risk from threats to slash funds and eliminate programs, your representatives in Congress need to hear from you urging their support for NEA funding.

TAKE ACTION: Contact your state's legislators before July 6. Current NEA funding is at $155 million, and the president's FY2012 budget proposes a cut to $146 million. The administration's budget also exempts proposed funds for the Our Town initiative from the 40% share of program funds mandated by Congress in 1997 for allocation to state arts agencies.
  • Urge your representatives to set the NEA funding for 2012 at $167.5 million, the same funding level as in 2010.
  • Stipulate that all program funds, including Our Town, be available as mandated for the 40% allocation to state arts agencies.
Maintaining the integrity of the 40% share for the states is extremely important for each state's ability to fulfill the federal mandate to expand access to the arts in every state. This provision does not affect the overall appropriation to the NEA. Let your legislators know the importance of NEA funds to assist you in your work of expanding involvement in the arts and promoting cultural opportunities for the citizens of your state, particularly at a time when arts organizations are feeling the effects of the economic downturn. Over the next week, please contact your state's representatives by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/ or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. Members of the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee, listed here, will vote on July 6 on the first draft of the funding bill providing for the NEA in FY2012. Please make a special effort to ask advocates from your state to contact these legislators if your state's representative is listed here. House Interior Subcommittee Members Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID), Chair Rep. Jerry Lewis (R-CA) Rep. Ken Calvert (R-CA) Rep. Steve LaTourette (R-OH) Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK) Rep. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) Rep. Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) Rep. Jim Moran (D-VA), Ranking Member Rep. Betty McCollum (D-MN) Rep. Maurice Hinchey (D-NY) Rep. Jose Serrano (D-NY) Please let me know if you have questions, and send me a note about the response you get from your contacts. Thank you for your interest and support in NASAA's advocacy action. [post_title] => House Set to Draft Arts Funding Bill; TAKE ACTION: Contact Your Representatives [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => house-set-draft-arts-funding-bill-take-action-contact-representatives [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:34:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:34:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3034 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
House Set to Draft Arts Funding Bill; TAKE ACTION: Contact Your Representatives

House Set to Draft Arts Funding Bill; TAKE ACTION: Contact Your Representatives
June 24, 2011

House Set to Draft Arts Funding Bill; TAKE ACTION: Contact Your Representatives

House Set to Draft Arts Funding Bill TAKE ACTION: Contact Your Representatives Urge NEA Funding at $167.5 Million, Maintain 40% to States June 24, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 18:11 The Interior Appropriations Subcommittee in the House of Representatives is scheduled on July 6 to vote on the first draft of a spending bill…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3035
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-05-27 12:12:19
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-05-27 12:12:19
    [post_content] => House Panel Votes to Eliminate Arts Ed; Prospects Uncertain

May 26, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 18:11

On Wednesday, May 25, the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, with authorizing jurisdiction over the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), passed on a strict party-line vote a bill to eliminate the U.S. Department of Education's Arts in Education program, which provides support for competitive grants to promote innovations in arts education.

The Setting New Priorities in Education Spending Act (H.R. 1891), introduced by Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-CA), chairman of the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary Education, would eliminate some 40 education programs identified as "inefficient and unnecessary."

An amendment to the bill, offered by Rep. Rush Holt (D-NJ), aimed to restore funding authorization for the arts education program and a handful of others such as language education, teaching of "traditional American history" and economic education. It failed to pass, on a party-line vote as well.

There is no word on when the bill might go to the House floor for a vote, or what its prospects might be in the Democrat-controlled Senate. Much of the legislative activity this year on Capitol Hill has revolved around legislation passed by the Republican majority in the House and rejected—or ignored—by the Democratic majority in the Senate.

The bill sponsored by Hunter was presented as the committee's debut effort in reform of ESEA. In fact, the measure has little to do with reform, failing to address concerns raised by Republicans as well as Democrats since the enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act. The serious consideration of reforming federal education policy remains in the future.

Social Network
    [post_title] => House Panel Votes to Eliminate Arts Ed; Prospects Uncertain
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-panel-votes-eliminate-arts-ed-prospects-uncertain
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:34:20
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:34:20
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3035
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Panel Votes to Eliminate Arts Ed; Prospects Uncertain

House Panel Votes to Eliminate Arts Ed; Prospects Uncertain
May 27, 2011

House Panel Votes to Eliminate Arts Ed; Prospects Uncertain

House Panel Votes to Eliminate Arts Ed; Prospects Uncertain May 26, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 18:11 On Wednesday, May 25, the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, with authorizing jurisdiction over the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), passed on a strict party-line vote a bill to eliminate the U.S. Department…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3051
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-05-25 12:17:49
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-05-25 12:17:49
    [post_content] => TAKE ACTION
Contact Your Representatives: Urge NEA Funding at $167.5 Million,
Maintain 40% to States

May 25, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 16:11

The House Appropriations Committee this week has begun drafting spending bills for fiscal year 2012. The Interior Appropriations Subcommittee, with responsibility for setting the funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), has not yet set a date for its mark-up session, but action is expected in the subcommittee in mid-June following a Memorial Day recess.

Members of Congress from both parties tell us that they need to hear from constituents about the value of federal funding for the arts. In this legislative session, where all attention is on paring down the size of the federal government by cutting funds and eliminating programs, it is essential that advocates take a moment to contact their representatives in Congress urging support for NEA funding.

TAKE ACTION: Now is the time to act by contacting your state's representatives in Congress. Current NEA funding is at $155 million, and the president's budget proposes a cut to $146 million. The administration's budget also exempts proposed funds for the Our Town initiative from the 40% share of program funds mandated by Congress in 1997 for allocation to state arts agencies.
  • Urge your representatives to set the NEA funding for 2012 at $167.5 million, the same funding level as in 2010.
  • Stipulate that all program funds, including Our Town, be available as mandated for the 40% allocation to state arts agencies.
Let your legislators know the importance of increasing funds to the NEA to assist you in your work of expanding involvement in the arts and promoting cultural opportunities for the citizens of your state, particularly at a time when arts organizations are feeling the effects of the economic downturn. Over the next two weeks, please contact your state's representatives by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/ or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. Members of the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee, listed here, have initial responsibility for drafting the funding bill providing for the NEA in 2012. Please make a special effort to ask advocates from your state to contact these legislators if your state's representative is listed here. House Interior Subcommittee Members Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID,) Chair Rep. Jerry Lewis (R-CA) Rep. Ken Calvert (R-CA) Rep. Steve LaTourette (R-OH) Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK) Rep. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) Rep. Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) Rep. Jim Moran (D-VA), Ranking Member Rep. Betty McCollum (D-MN) Rep. Maurice Hinchey (D-NY) Rep. Jose Serrano (D-NY) Please let me know if you have questions, and send me a note about the response you get from your contacts. Thank you for your interest and support in NASAA's advocacy action. [post_title] => Take Action—Contact Your Representatives: Urge NEA Funding at $167.5 Million, Maintain 40% to States [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => take-action-contact-representatives-urge-nea-funding-167-5-million-maintain-40-states [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:34:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:34:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3051 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Take Action—Contact Your Representatives: Urge NEA Funding at $167.5 Million, Maintain 40% to States

Take Action—Contact Your Representatives: Urge NEA Funding at $167.5 Million, Maintain 40% to States
May 25, 2011

Take Action—Contact Your Representatives: Urge NEA Funding at $167.5 Million, Maintain 40% to States

TAKE ACTION Contact Your Representatives: Urge NEA Funding at $167.5 Million, Maintain 40% to States May 25, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 16:11 The House Appropriations Committee this week has begun drafting spending bills for fiscal year 2012. The Interior Appropriations Subcommittee, with responsibility for setting the funding for the National Endowment for…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3036
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-05-23 12:17:29
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-05-23 12:17:29
    [post_content] => Take Action: House Panel to Vote on Arts Ed Elimination

May 23, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 15:11

On Wednesday, May 25, the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, with authorizing jurisdiction over the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), is expected to vote on legislation that would eliminate the U.S. Department of Education's Arts in Education program, which provides support for competitive grants to promote innovations in arts education. State arts agencies have been successful applicants for the program's support.

The Setting New Priorities in Education Spending Act (H.R. 1891), introduced by Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-CA), chairman of the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education, would, according to the committee's website, "begin the process of weeding out inefficient and unnecessary K-12 education programs." The Hunter bill would eliminate 43 programs, some of which—including the Arts in Education program—have been proposed by the Obama administration to be folded into a single program of grant support for program innovations in education. Arts education advocates have opposed the Obama proposal; Hunter's bill would do worse by repealing the funding authority altogether.

The House Committee on Education and the Workforce is scheduled to vote on this legislation on Wednesday morning. Please contact your representatives on the committee, listed hereand below, and:
  • urge their vote against H.R. 1891;
  • impress upon them the value of federal leadership in developing innovative approaches in arts education;
  • remind them that the unintended consequences of the No Child Left Behind Act have diminished the presence of arts education in the classroom.
You may contact your representatives by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/ or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. House Committee on Education and the Workforce Republicans John Kline, Minnesota (Chairman) Martha Roby, Alabama Duncan D. Hunter, California Howard P. "Buck" McKeon, California Dennis Ross, Florida Judy Biggert, Illinois Larry Bucshon, Indiana Todd Rokita, Indiana Tim Walberg, Michigan Joe Heck, Nevada Richard Hanna, New York Virginia Foxx, North Carolina Lou Barletta, Pennsylvania Mike Kelly, Pennsylvania Todd Russell Platts, Pennsylvania Glenn Thompson, Pennsylvania Trey Gowdy, South Carolina Joe Wilson, South Carolina Kristi Noem, South Dakota Scott DesJarlais, Tennessee David P. Roe, Tennessee Thomas E. Petri, Wisconsin Democrats George Miller, California (Ranking Member) Raúl M. Grijalva, Arizona Susan A. Davis, California Lynn C. Woolsey, California Mazie Hirono, Hawaii Dave Loebsack, Iowa John F. Tierney, Massachusetts Dale E. Kildee, Michigan Robert E. Andrews, New Jersey Rush D. Holt, New Jersey Donald M. Payne, New Jersey Timothy H. Bishop, New York Carolyn McCarthy, New York Dennis J. Kucinich, Ohio David Wu, Oregon Rubén Hinojosa, Texas Robert C. Scott, Virginia [post_title] => Take Action: House Panel to Vote on Arts Ed Elimination [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => take-action-house-panel-vote-arts-ed-elimination [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:34:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:34:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3036 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Take Action: House Panel to Vote on Arts Ed Elimination

Take Action: House Panel to Vote on Arts Ed Elimination
May 23, 2011

Take Action: House Panel to Vote on Arts Ed Elimination

Take Action: House Panel to Vote on Arts Ed Elimination May 23, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 15:11 On Wednesday, May 25, the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, with authorizing jurisdiction over the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), is expected to vote on legislation that would eliminate the U.S. Department…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3037
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-05-11 12:17:31
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-05-11 12:17:31
    [post_content] => May 11, 2011

From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 14:11

NEA FY2012 Budget Questioned at House Hearing 

On May 11, Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID), chair of the House Subcommittee on Interior Appropriations, opened the hearing on the fiscal year 2012 budget proposed for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) with the warning that "intense competition for federal dollars" demands that legislators in Congress must examine not only the size of the budget proposed but also the quality of programs funded to serve their constituents so as not to erode the support the NEA has enjoyed in Congress. "It is the role of this subcommittee," Simpson said, "to ensure that we don't lose that support."

In his opening statement preceding the testimony of NEA Chairman Rocco Landesman, Simpson pointed to the work of the state arts agencies in carrying out the mission of the NEA, recalling that Congress in 1997 had mandated that 40% of the arts endowment's program funds must be allocated to the states because state arts agencies are in a better position to reach their communities. Simpson expressed his displeasure over the failure of the NEA in its 2012 budget proposal to comply with the 40% mandate by positioning Our Town outside the program grants category, saying it was "of great concern" and "a troubling precedent" that undermines the support for state arts agencies.

In his testimony, Landesman presented to the subcommittee the Obama administration's FY2012 budget proposal of $146.255 million for the arts endowment, a decrease of 13% from the 2010 level of appropriations, which he said was "consistent with the agency's fiscal 2008 budget. . . . We have worked to make the smartest decisions possible within the current fiscal reality." Those decisions, Landesman explained, were guided by the agency's newly revised strategic plan, "which has as its central theme the agency's desire to gather and communicate even more data and analysis about the impact of federal funding on the arts."

Landesman referred to the state arts agencies as "key partners in so much of the agency's work." He went on to explain that the NEA is asking Congress for a clarification of the kind of funds that states use to match NEA support and permission to develop "narrow guidelines" governing a temporary waiver of the match.

When asked by Simpson whether the NEA planned to continue support for the Shakespeare in America's Communities program, Landesman said that funds would still be available through the NEA's theatre program, but that the agency was able to save $400,000 in administrative costs by taking the program away from a third-party administrator and folding it into the agency's program. Asked about the Big Read, the NEA chair said that its funding would be "protected in 2012."

Simpson pursued a line of questioning about the Our Town initiative, which he called "a different role" for the NEA in "community development" that perhaps is "better left to other agencies" such as the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The money allocated to Our Town—$5 million—comes, Simpson suggested, at the expense of other programs. When Landesman named examples of the kind of projects he envisions for Our Town, Simpson responded that those were projects that were funded outside of NEA support before Our Town launched.

Simpson went on to assert that Congress does not want to "sacrifice those programs that are making a difference," and referred to concern from members of the National Council on the Arts that the NEA was reducing funding streams to the states. He asked Landesman to explain the role of the council. The main role, Landesman said, is to vote on grants, not to set general NEA policy, which he said is done by him as chair of the NEA. He allowed that members of the National Council on the Arts "don't necessarily agree on everything being done by the NEA."

When asked by Rep. Jim Moran (D-VA), ranking member of the subcommittee, why the NEA budget was proposing to cut funds to the states for underserved populations by more than $3 million, Landesman said "that must be a proportional cut."

Rep. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) focused his questioning on what he called grants that could "lend themselves to ridicule," citing NEA funds for the International Accordion Festival, the Fabric Workshop and Museum and the San Francisco Mime Troupe. Landesman said he was familiar with the San Francisco group and praised them for their international recognition.

Flake questioned the judgment in awarding grants to organizations affiliated with universities with large endowments that might otherwise provide the needed support. He listed grants awarded to Boston University, Notre Dame, Columbia and Yale. Landesman suggested that these were for productions or projects of theatres or small presses, for example, that are associated with a large institution but are not necessarily funded by the university.

In response to plans announced by the NEA in its budget proposal to eliminate the National Heritage awards, Rep. Jose Serrano (D-NY) cautioned against discontinuing the fellowships. He said that he had heard concerns from community groups in his congressional district about the elimination of these awards, which he called "an important commitment."

The House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee may be expected to begin drafting a 2012 appropriations bill in June. The Senate, which does not plan a hearing on the NEA budget proposal, would follow thereafter.
    [post_title] => NEA FY2012 Budget Questioned at House Hearing
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => nea-fy2012-budget-questioned-house-hearing
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:35:30
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:35:30
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3037
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
NEA FY2012 Budget Questioned at House Hearing

NEA FY2012 Budget Questioned at House Hearing
May 11, 2011

NEA FY2012 Budget Questioned at House Hearing

May 11, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 14:11 NEA FY2012 Budget Questioned at House Hearing  On May 11, Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID), chair of the House Subcommittee on Interior Appropriations, opened the hearing on the fiscal year 2012 budget proposed for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) with the warning that “intense…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3038
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-04-12 12:17:32
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-04-12 12:17:32
    [post_content] => April 12, 2011
To: State Arts Agency Executive Directors and Chairs
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 13:11

Final 2011 Budget Bill Sets NEA Funds at $155 Million

The final budget agreement negotiated by President Obama with House and Senate Republican and Democratic leaders, H.R. 1473, is set to go to the House floor for a vote on Wednesday, April 13, with action to follow in the Senate. The bill sets 2011 funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at $155 million for the year. This is the same amount proposed in H.R. 1 by the Republican leadership on the House Appropriations Committee in February: a cut of $12.5 million from $167.5 million in 2010.

That measure was roundly rejected by Republican freshmen legislators before the initial draft of H.R. 1 even went to the House floor. The continuing resolution (CR) for 2011 that eventually passed the House in February would have reduced arts endowment funding to $124.4 million. In March, the Senate rejected H.R. 1, and also failed to pass a Democratic alternative with NEA appropriations at $167.5 million.

The 2011 CR reduces federal spending overall by $38.5 billion from 2010 spending levels. The bill includes the $12 billion in cuts already taken and signed into law in the previous three continuing resolutions, as well as nearly $28 billion in new budget reductions. The final CR also includes $25 million for the U.S. Department of Education's arts education grants, which had been eliminated completely in an earlier, short-term CR.

The new CR instructs federal agencies, including the NEA, to provide Congress within 30 days of enactment of the bill with a detailed spending plan for the remainder of the 2011 fiscal year.
    [post_title] => Final 2011 Budget Bill Sets NEA Funds at $155 Million
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => final-2011-budget-bill-sets-nea-funds-155-million
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:35:43
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:35:43
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3038
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
Final 2011 Budget Bill Sets NEA Funds at $155 Million

Final 2011 Budget Bill Sets NEA Funds at $155 Million
April 12, 2011

Final 2011 Budget Bill Sets NEA Funds at $155 Million

April 12, 2011 To: State Arts Agency Executive Directors and Chairs From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 13:11 Final 2011 Budget Bill Sets NEA Funds at $155 Million The final budget agreement negotiated by President Obama with House and Senate Republican and Democratic leaders, H.R. 1473, is set to go to the House floor for…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3039
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-03-31 12:17:33
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-03-31 12:17:33
    [post_content] => March 31, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 12:11

Action Update: Congress Nearing 2011 Budget Agreement;
Attention Turning to 2012 Budget Issues

2011 Budget Talks

The House and Senate Republican and Democratic leaders appear to be coming closer to a final agreement on funding for the remainder of the 2011 fiscal year. Federal agencies are operating now—until April 8—under the sixth continuing resolution (CR) of the fiscal year. In February, the House passed H.R. 1, with $61 billion in cuts to 2011 spending, including a reduction in funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) to $124.4 million from $167.5 million in 2010. That measure failed to pass the Senate.

Negotiations on Capitol Hill this week are reported to have come to agreement on cutting as much as $33 billion from the 2011 budget. The two sides already have eliminated $10 billion in passage of the two last CRs, including $40 million in funds for the Department of Education's Arts in Education grants. That leaves $23 billion in discretionary spending to identify for cuts. Appropriators have been given the signal from their leadership to get to work on figuring where to cut.

Advocacy Continues

In my meetings on Capitol Hill this week and last, House and Senate staff have advised the importance of hearing from constituents on the budget issues.

Contact your representatives and senators NOW to ask for restoration of FY2011 funding for the NEA and the Arts in Education program:
  • Restore FY2011 funding for the NEA to ensure that funding for the current year is not reduced to the level passed by the House, with its cut from the 2010 level of $167.5 million down to a proposed level of $124.4 million.
  • Reinstate the $40 million in the Arts in Education program at the U.S. Department of Education, which provides vital federal leadership and funding that improves schools, teaching and student learning. Cuts to this program will take away funding for multiyear programs that are already in progress.
You may contact your senators by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/ or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. 2012 NEA Budget Proposal On April 6, NEA chair Rocco Landesman will testify before the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee to present the administration's budget request for fiscal year 2012. The budget would cut NEA funds from the 2010 level of $167.5 million to $146.255 million. In the current budget climate, some measure of reduced funding should be expected. NASAA's advocacy is focused on keeping the arts endowment's funding at the highest possible level—to reject the president's funding request—and to focus congressional attention and action on a number of proposals in the budget that affect state arts agencies, some in a negative way. In meetings I have had with appropriations subcommittee staff, and contacts made by NASAA members from states that have legislators on the key committees, NASAA's position is clear: the NEA budget must maintain the congressional mandate that 40% of ALL of its program funds be allocated to the states and regions. Your Advocacy In communications with your senators and representatives on the 2012 budget, stress the value of the federal allocation of 40% of NEA program funds to the states and regions.
  • It is through state arts agencies that the NEA is able to reach beyond its own direct grants into communities throughout the nation, extending the breadth and depth of support to every corner of every state.
  • States help the NEA to achieve its goals and mandates—especially in the areas of arts education and reaching underserved constituencies.
  • States extend the NEA's reach, impact and influence, especially to rural and underserved populations that the NEA can't reach.
  • State arts funding gets dollars into every congressional district.
  • A departure from the 40% mandate poses negative financial consequences for the states and compromises the capacity of state arts agencies to fulfill the federal mission.
NASAA will keep you informed and engaged in our advocacy effort as the 2012 budget process unfolds. NASAA Positions on NEA 2012 Budget Proposal Following are NASAA's positions on the issues raised by the FY2012 NEA budget proposal. Allocation of Program Funds to States: The NEA budget requests that the $5 million that funds the Our Town initiative be exempt from its program funds in 2012. In 2011, funding for Our Town at $5 million is included in the total program funding. The proposal to exempt Our Town funding from the state allocation violates the current policy that was established consistent with congressional directives to allocate 40% of program funds to the state arts agencies. This budgetary shift in funding effectively reduces support to state arts agencies by $2 million. This shift from established policy is inconsistent with the NEA's own stated budget priority that "State funding will be adjusted commensurate with the overall program reduction." It is through state arts agencies that the NEA is able to reach beyond its own direct grants into communities throughout the nation. NASAA urges Congress to include any funding for the Our Town program with the program funds allocated as part of the full 40% share to state arts agencies. Matching Requirements: The NEA is seeking statutory clarification regarding the state arts agencies' allowed matching requirements. The administration's intention is to "clarify that match must come from funds controlled and managed by the State and that funds from third parties not directly controlled and managed by the State are not eligible (such as subgrant match)." The proposed clarifying language would allow states to match with such funds as appropriated funds, donated funds and trust funds. Clarification of matching requirements is desirable provided some flexibility is provided to states during the short term. NASAA requests that Congress require the NEA to consult with the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies and the state arts agencies about how to craft this language for the appropriate identification of eligible matching funds. Match Waivers: The administration's 2012 budget document seeks permission from Congress to develop criteria on the "waive-of-match" provision for states and regions. The administration explains that while states may seek a waiver authority, it does not appear to be the intent of the NEA's authorizing legislation "to allow waiver of match in perpetuity," and guidance is desirable as to the circumstances around the ability of states and regions to seek a waiver of match. Again, NASAA requests that Congress require the NEA to consult with the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies and the state arts agencies about how to develop these criteria for waiver of matching funds. Poetry Out Loud: The NEA proposes to reduce funding to Poetry Out Loud, the national poetry recitation contest. The program was initiated by the NEA and made a national competition with cooperation of state arts agencies. NASAA requests that the NEA first seek other sponsors for this event before considering any reductions to state arts agencies. If any reduction is to be made in Poetry Out Loud, it should be proportional to the decrease in overall program funds. Poetry Out Loud is worthy of maintaining at its current budget level, but if the NEA should be cut, Poetry Out Loud grants to states should not be reduced by a percentage greater than the overall agency cut to program funds. Arts in Education: Similarly, the NEA is proposing to reduce its support to state arts agencies for arts in education. Prior to the cuts in the NEA budget in the 1990s, the NEA invested $5 million for arts education. This amount has been reduced over the years to $1.7 million in FY2010. NASAA requests that any reduction in support for arts in education should be proportional to funding decreases taken in other NEA programs. Heritage and Jazz Awards: The NEA proposes to replace national honors in folk/traditional arts and jazz with combined awards that address all art forms. The singular awards are vitally important to promoting the continued health of these efforts, which are typically outside the mainstream of the arts. NASAA supports the position to maintain the National Heritage Awards and Jazz Masters Awards. Many state arts agencies consider their folk and traditional arts programs to be among their highest priorities. Jazz has been called America's classical music, and is arguably America's most important original contribution to the arts. [post_title] => Action Update: 2011 and 2012 Budget Issues [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => action-update-2011-2012-budget-issues [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:36:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:36:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3039 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Action Update: 2011 and 2012 Budget Issues

Action Update: 2011 and 2012 Budget Issues
March 31, 2011

Action Update: 2011 and 2012 Budget Issues

March 31, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 12:11 Action Update: Congress Nearing 2011 Budget Agreement; Attention Turning to 2012 Budget Issues 2011 Budget Talks The House and Senate Republican and Democratic leaders appear to be coming closer to a final agreement on funding for the remainder of the 2011 fiscal year. Federal agencies are…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3040
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-03-07 12:17:35
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-03-07 12:17:35
    [post_content] => March 7, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 11:11

Action Update: Senate Democrats' Bill Maintains NEA Funding Level

The debate over the fiscal year 2011 federal budget continues. The Senate Appropriations Committee has released its version of the year-long continuing resolution (CR) proposing to hold funds for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at the 2010 level of $167.5 million. This is the Senate Democrats' response to the measure passed by the House in early February proposing to cut NEA funds by $43 million in the current year.

Tomorrow afternoon the Senate plans to vote on both bills—the Democrats' proposed FY2011 funding bill, which cuts $6.5 billion beyond the $4 billion cut in the short-term continuing resolution passed last week, and the bill passed by the Republican majority in the House in February to cut a total of $61.5 billion. Neither measure is expected to receive the 60 votes Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) has said he will require to let either bill go forward. With the votes put aside, negotiations will continue to arrive at an agreement on how much gets cut from the overall federal budget in 2011.

Advocacy continues: Your continued advocacy is essential to keep the message in front of your senators and representatives to maintain current funding for the National Endowment for the Arts, and to restore $40 million in funding for the U.S. Department of Education's Arts in Education program, which was eliminated in the short-term CR passed a week ago.

The Senate Democrats' response to the arts endowment's spending, setting the budget at the 2010 level, is an encouraging sign. This is not the last word, however, on FY2011 funding. The final outcome will be decided as the House and Senate negotiations unfold over the coming couple of weeks to craft the full-year FY2011 budget resolution carrying federal spending through the remaining months of the current fiscal year.

Your help is needed to ensure that federal funding is reinstated for the Arts in Education program and that the funds cut by the House for the NEA are restored. As debate continues over the next week or two, your advocacy is essential. Please speak up for saving arts funding in the final FY2011 appropriations bill.

Contact your senators NOW to ask for restoration of FY2011 funding for the NEA and the Arts in Education program:
  • Restore FY2011 funding for the National Endowment for the Arts to ensure that NEA funding for the current year is not reduced to the level passed by the House, with its cut of funding from the 2010 level of $167.5 million down to a proposed level of $124.5 million.
  • Reinstate the Arts in Education program at the U.S. Department of Education, which provides vital federal leadership and funding that improves schools, teaching, and student learning. Cuts to this program will take away funding for multiyear programs that are already in progress!
You may contact your senators by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/ or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. [post_title] => Action Update: Senate Democrats' Bill Maintains NEA Funding Level [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => action-update-senate-democrats-bill-maintains-nea-funding-level [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:36:18 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:36:18 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3040 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Action Update: Senate Democrats' Bill Maintains NEA Funding Level

Action Update: Senate Democrats' Bill Maintains NEA Funding Level
March 7, 2011

Action Update: Senate Democrats' Bill Maintains NEA Funding Level

March 7, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 11:11 Action Update: Senate Democrats’ Bill Maintains NEA Funding Level The debate over the fiscal year 2011 federal budget continues. The Senate Appropriations Committee has released its version of the year-long continuing resolution (CR) proposing to hold funds for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) at…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3041
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-03-04 12:17:36
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-03-04 12:17:36
    [post_content] => March 4, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 10:11

TAKE ACTION: FY2011 Spending Bill Eliminates Arts Ed; NEA Funds at Risk

The U.S. House and Senate this week passed another short-term continuing resolution for fiscal year 2011, signed into law by the president, to fund the federal government through March 18. The new funding bill immediately cuts $4 billion in domestic spending, including the elimination of the $40 million in the U.S. Department of Education's Arts in Education program, which provides funds for the Arts Education Model Development and Dissemination and Professional Development competitive grants, and the VSA and Kennedy Center arts education programs. The elimination of these funds in FY2011 jeopardizes funding for multiyear projects already in place by terminating funding for the 2011-2012 school year and beyond. We hope to see these funds reinstated in the final, full-year 2011 continuing resolution.

Last month, the House of Representatives passed a full-year FY2011 continuing resolution with a $43 million reduction in funding to the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and elimination as well of the Arts in Education program funding. The Senate has not yet acted.

This is not the last word on FY2011 funding. The final outcome has yet to be decided as the House and Senate negotiate on the full-year FY2011 budget resolution to carry federal spending through the remaining months of the current fiscal year.

Your help is needed to ensure that federal funding is reinstated for the Arts in Education program and that the funds cut by the House for the National Endowment for the Arts are restored. As debate continues over the next week or two, your advocacy is essential. Please speak up for saving arts funding in the final FY2011 appropriations bill.

Contact your senators NOW to ask for restoration of FY2011 funding for the NEA and the Arts in Education program:
  • Restore FY2011 funding for the National Endowment for the Arts to ensure that NEA funding for the current year is not reduced to the level passed by the House, with its cut of funding from the 2010 level of $167.5 million down to a proposed level of $124.5 million.
  • Reinstate the Arts in Education program at the U.S. Department of Education, which provides vital federal leadership and funding that improve schools, teaching and student learning. Cuts to this program will take away funding for multiyear programs that are already in progress!
You may contact your senators by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/ or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. Thank you for your advocacy and support of our efforts at NASAA to safeguard federal arts funds. Please let us know what you hear back from your contacts on Capitol Hill. Your partnership in our advocacy effort is key to our collective success. [post_title] => Take Action: FY2011 Spending Bill Eliminates Arts Ed; NEA Funds at Risk [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => take-action-fy2011-spending-bill-eliminates-arts-ed-nea-funds-risk [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:36:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:36:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3041 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Take Action: FY2011 Spending Bill Eliminates Arts Ed; NEA Funds at Risk

Take Action: FY2011 Spending Bill Eliminates Arts Ed; NEA Funds at Risk
March 4, 2011

Take Action: FY2011 Spending Bill Eliminates Arts Ed; NEA Funds at Risk

March 4, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 10:11 TAKE ACTION: FY2011 Spending Bill Eliminates Arts Ed; NEA Funds at Risk The U.S. House and Senate this week passed another short-term continuing resolution for fiscal year 2011, signed into law by the president, to fund the federal government through March 18. The new funding bill…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3042
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-03-01 12:17:37
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-03-01 12:17:37
    [post_content] => March 1, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 09:11

Take Action: Urge Senators to Maintain NEA Funding

Update: Short-Term Continuing Resolution

The U.S. House and Senate are preparing to pass a short-term continuing resolution to replace the current spending measure expiring March 4. The new funding bill, which is set to run until March 18, would include cuts of $4 billion over a two-week period by eliminating earmarked funds and terminating programs identified by President Obama in his proposed budget. Appropriations to the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) are not at risk in this bill, which otherwise continues to fund federal agencies at the fiscal year 2010 level.

FY2011 Continuing Resolution

Between now and March 18, the Senate and the House must come to agreement on the provisions in a continuing resolution to carry funding for the remainder of the 2011 fiscal year. The House passed its bill two weeks ago, H.R. 1, which includes a cut of $42 million from the NEA 2011 budget. It is unclear whether the Senate will pass its own bill, or negotiate an agreed upon measure with the House before moving forward on the Senate floor.

Immediate Action

Contact your senators NOW to ensure that funding for the National Endowment for the Arts in the current year is not reduced to the level passed by the House, with its cut of funding from the 2010 level of $167.5 million down to a proposed level of a total of $124.5 million.

Please take time over the coming week to urge your senators to maintain the NEA's 2011 funding at the 2010 level of $167.5 million. Tell your senators to reject the deep cuts taken by the House in federal arts support.

You may contact your senators by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/, or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121.
  • Remind your senators that 40% of NEA program funds go to state arts agencies. A cut to federal funding is a cut to dollars that support your state's cultural, economic and education policies.
  • NEA funds help produce and maintain jobs in the creative sector, generate tax revenues and stimulate consumer spending for your state's economy.
  • The magnitude of cuts proposed in the House-passed bill will mean cuts in access to arts programs for inner city, rural and underserved communities and for disabled and older people in your state.
  • Cuts at the level passed by the House will diminish your agency's ability to support arts education and help facilitate children's success in school.
Thank you for your advocacy and your support of our efforts at NASAA to safeguard federal arts funds. Please let us know what you hear back from your contacts on Capitol Hill. Your partnership in our advocacy effort is key to our collective success. Next Up: Fiscal Year 2012 Once Congress has finished with the continuing appropriations bill for 2011, legislators will turn their attention to President Obama's 2012 budget. The administration has proposed a cut in funds to the NEA to the level of $145 million. The Obama budget proposal will mean cuts in the partnership grants to state arts agencies and reductions in the arts education grants to states, along with funding decreases overall in the budget of the NEA. What's more, the administration's budget for the first time exempts a special initiative—Our Town—from program funds subject to the 40% share going to states. This proposal is unprecedented. When you talk to your senators—and your representatives—remind them of the importance of the funds set aside for state arts agencies at 40% of all NEA program funds. Remind them that robust funding at the federal level enables you to do a better job of reaching more constituents in your state. [post_title] => Take Action: Urge Senators to Maintain NEA Funding [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => take-action-urge-senators-maintain-nea-funding [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:36:44 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:36:44 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3042 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Take Action: Urge Senators to Maintain NEA Funding

Take Action: Urge Senators to Maintain NEA Funding
March 1, 2011

Take Action: Urge Senators to Maintain NEA Funding

March 1, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 09:11 Take Action: Urge Senators to Maintain NEA Funding Update: Short-Term Continuing Resolution The U.S. House and Senate are preparing to pass a short-term continuing resolution to replace the current spending measure expiring March 4. The new funding bill, which is set to run until March 18,…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3043
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-02-18 12:17:39
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-02-18 12:17:39
    [post_content] => February 18, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 08:11

House Moves to Wrap up 2011 Funding Bill, Action Moves to Senate

The U.S. House of Representatives is working to finish with amendments and a final vote on H.R. 1, the continuing resolution for funding the 2011 fiscal year. Both the House and Senate plan to leave by the weekend for a week's recess. When they return on February 28, the Senate will begin its consideration of the 2011 funding measure.

With attention now shifting to the Senate, it is essential that advocates contact their senators to ensure that funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is not reduced to the level passed by the House, which cut a total of $42 million from the arts endowment's 2011 budget.

TAKE ACTION: Please take time over the coming week to contact your senators. Urge them to maintain the NEA's FY2011 funding at the 2010 level of $167.5 million.

You may contact your senators by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/, or by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121.

These are the key points to make in your communications with your senators:
  • Public funding for the arts is a sound investment in states and communities facing tough economic conditions.
  • The arts generate jobs, tax revenues and consumer spending.
  • NEA funds to state arts agencies are even more critical when a depressed economy is straining state budgets.
Even though the Senate will start work on its bill by February 28, it remains uncertain whether the final continuing resolution will be completed by the March 4 deadline, when the current continuing resolution expires. With the two chambers certain to differ significantly on funding levels, the task of reconciling the two bills into one is a complex assignment. Already, Democrats in leadership positions in the House and the Senate have said that they would not stand in the way of a shutdown of the federal government if the funding debate has not been resolved by March 4. These NASAA resources can help you make the case: Roll Call Votes on the Walberg Amendment Earlier this week, the House passed by a close vote (217-209) an amendment to reduce FY2011 funding for the NEA by an additional $20.5 million from the level of $145 million set in the bill from the Appropriations Committee. Twenty-two Republicans joined all but three of the Democrats in voting against the cuts proposed in the amendment authored by Rep. Tim Walberg (R-MI). Among Republicans who voted to hold back cuts on arts funding were many of those that NASAA had targeted for special attention. Also in the Republican column were eight members of the new freshman class of legislators and two sophomores in their second term for whom we had no previous voting record. The complete state-by-state roll call has been tabulated by our colleagues at the League of American Orchestras. Here are the Republican representatives who voted against the Walberg amendment, and the Democrats who voted for it. Thanks to all of you for your committed advocacy with your legislators in the House of Representatives. Republicans Voting against NEA Cuts Rep. Vern Buchanan (FL) Rep. Michael Simpson (ID) Rep. Judy Biggert (IL) Rep. Robert Dold (IL) Rep. Aaron Schock (IL) Rep. John Shimkus (IL) Rep. Charles Bass (NH) Rep. Leonard Lance (NJ) Rep. Chris Gibson (NY) Rep. Michael Grimm (NY) Rep. Richard Hanna (NY) Rep. Steven LaTourette (OH) Rep. Steve Stivers (OH) Rep. Patrick Tiberi (OH) Rep. Michael Turner (OH) Rep. Greg Walden (OR) Rep. Charles Dent (PA) Rep. Jim Gerlach (PA) Rep. Patrick Meehan (PA) Rep. Todd Platts (PA) Rep. David Reichert (WA) Rep. David McKinley (WV) Democrats Voting for NEA Cuts Rep. Dennis Cardoza (CA) Rep. Jim Costa (CA) Rep. Dan Boren (OK)   [post_title] => House Moves to Wrap up 2011 Funding Bill, Action Moves to Senate [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => house-moves-wrap-2011-funding-bill-action-moves-senate [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:37:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:37:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3043 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
House Moves to Wrap up 2011 Funding Bill, Action Moves to Senate

House Moves to Wrap up 2011 Funding Bill, Action Moves to Senate
February 18, 2011

House Moves to Wrap up 2011 Funding Bill, Action Moves to Senate

February 18, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 08:11 House Moves to Wrap up 2011 Funding Bill, Action Moves to Senate The U.S. House of Representatives is working to finish with amendments and a final vote on H.R. 1, the continuing resolution for funding the 2011 fiscal year. Both the House and Senate plan…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3044
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-02-17 12:17:40
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-02-17 12:17:40
    [post_content] => February 17, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 07:11

House Takes up 2011 Funding Bill, Votes for Deeper Cuts in NEA

The House of Representatives today finished voting on a series of amendments offered during the course of debate on H.R. 1, the continuing resolution to fund the federal government for the remainder of the 2011 fiscal year. The bill on the House floor, which already would reduce appropriations for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) from the current level of $167.5 million to $145 million, was amended to cut another $20.5 million from the arts agency's funding.

The amendment to further reduce NEA funding, introduced by Rep. Tim Walberg (R-MI), was one of three introduced in the House with an aim at cutting funds for the arts endowment. The unofficial recorded vote (still not posted by the House clerk) was close, passing by 217-209.

Two other amendments to eliminate the agency's funding entirely—one introduced by Rep. Scott Garrett (R-NJ) and the other by Rep. Connie Mack (R-FL)—were withdrawn from consideration.

In offering his amendment on the House floor, Rep. Walberg pointed out that the cut he proposed would take NEA funding back to the 2006 level. He observed that "Our country is in financial hardship, and we are not taking programs like the NEA off the table."

Rep. Walberg went on to explain a relationship between the economy, philanthropy and federal funding that informed his position: ". . . at a time when our government is in a position where it must cut Federal spending, I believe one of the main sources of the funding for the arts needs to be through philanthropy, but that only happens best in a sound and a growing economy. This budget crisis, this economy, continues to be frustrated by the spending of government, which frustrates individuals, who, indeed, would be willing to support and, in fact, still do support the arts as well."

Rep. Jim Moran (D-VA), former chair of the appropriations subcommittee responsible for the NEA's budget, spoke against the amendment and in support of federal arts funding. "The NEA's contribution to deficit reduction is really infinitesimal," he said, "but its elimination would not be. It would be very costly." He advised his colleagues to recognize the achievements of programs like Signature Theatre in his congressional district, which "received NEA grants for its nationally recognized artistic and education programs."

Moran was joined by Rep. Norm Dicks (D-WA), also formerly the chair of the appropriations subcommittee, and Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY), who made the point that "the arts not only contribute to education and enlightenment, they're important job creators."

Consideration of the 2011 continuing resolution shifts next to the Senate, which is expected to take up its version of the funding bill the week of February 28, following a week's recess for both the House and Senate. With the two chambers certain to differ significantly on the money issues, it is unlikely that the complex task of reconciling the two bills into one can be accomplished by March 4, when the current continuing resolution expires. Congress probably will pass another short-term funding resolution to buy time for negotiating the final agreement, and then turn its attention to the 2012 budget proposed by President Obama on February 14.
    [post_title] => House Takes up 2011 Funding Bill, Votes for Deeper Cuts in NEA
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-takes-2011-funding-bill-votes-deeper-cuts-nea
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:37:24
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:37:24
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3044
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Takes up 2011 Funding Bill, Votes for Deeper Cuts in NEA

House Takes up 2011 Funding Bill, Votes for Deeper Cuts in NEA
February 17, 2011

House Takes up 2011 Funding Bill, Votes for Deeper Cuts in NEA

February 17, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 07:11 House Takes up 2011 Funding Bill, Votes for Deeper Cuts in NEA The House of Representatives today finished voting on a series of amendments offered during the course of debate on H.R. 1, the continuing resolution to fund the federal government for the remainder of…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3045
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-02-16 12:17:41
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-02-16 12:17:41
    [post_content] => February 16, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 06:11

URGENT—Take Action: Oppose Amendments to Further Cuts, Elimination of NEA 2011 Funding

The House of Representatives today and tomorrow is debating the continuing resolution to fund the federal government for the remainder of the 2011 fiscal year. The bill on the House floor already reduces appropriations for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) from the current level of $167.5 million to $145 million. As we expected, two amendments have been introduced aimed at doing further damage.

Thanks to all of you who have been calling and writing your members of Congress to oppose these amendments. Please continue to take action. Contact your representatives in the House today and urge them to:
  • Oppose the amendment offered by Rep. Tim Walberg (R-MI) that would decrease NEA funding by an additional $20.6 million, for a total NEA cut of $43.1 million.
  • Oppose the amendment offered by Rep. Scott Garrett (R-NJ) that would eliminate FY2011 NEA funding altogether.
You may contact your senators and representatives by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/, or through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. These are the key points to make in your communications with your legislators:
  • Public funding for the arts is a sound investment in states and communities facing tough economic conditions.
  • The arts generate jobs, tax revenues and consumer spending.
  • NEA funds to state arts agencies are even more critical when a depressed economy is straining state budgets.
These NASAA resources can help you make the case: Taking Charge of Change Why Should Government Support the Arts? [post_title] => URGENT—Take Action: Oppose Amendments to Further Cuts, Elimination of NEA 2011 Funding [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => urgent-take-action-oppose-amendments-cuts-elimination-nea-2011-funding [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:37:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:37:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3045 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
URGENT—Take Action: Oppose Amendments to Further Cuts, Elimination of NEA 2011 Funding

URGENT—Take Action: Oppose Amendments to Further Cuts, Elimination of NEA 2011 Funding
February 16, 2011

URGENT—Take Action: Oppose Amendments to Further Cuts, Elimination of NEA 2011 Funding

February 16, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 06:11 URGENT—Take Action: Oppose Amendments to Further Cuts, Elimination of NEA 2011 Funding The House of Representatives today and tomorrow is debating the continuing resolution to fund the federal government for the remainder of the 2011 fiscal year. The bill on the House floor already reduces appropriations…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3046
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-02-14 12:17:42
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-02-14 12:17:42
    [post_content] => February 14, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 05:11

President's 2012 Budget Proposes NEA Fund Cut

President Obama sent his fiscal year 2012 budget proposal to Congress today, with a cut in funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) from the 2010 level of $167.5 million to $146.255 million. (Congress still has not resolved federal government spending levels for 2011.) In each of the past two years, the Obama administration has requested funding for the NEA at $161.315 million. The funding level proposed in the administration's 2012 budget is close to the amount appropriated to the NEA in 2008, at $144.7 million.

At the same time as the president asks Congress for a reduction of $21.25 million in appropriations to the NEA, the administration's budget proposes to allocate $5 million for the Our Town initiative. With a break in precedent, the funds for the initiative are not subject to the requirement that 40% of grant-making funds be allocated to the state and regional arts organizations. The budget documents also explain that NEA funds to the states for arts education above the 40% allocation will be available at a reduced level.

The NEA is seeking statutory clarification regarding the allowed match for grants made by state arts agencies. The administration's intention is to "clarify that match must come from funds controlled and managed by the State and that funds from third parties not directly controlled and managed by the State are not eligible (such as subgrant match.)" The proposed clarifying language would allow states to match with such funds as appropriated funds, donated funds and trust funds.

The administration's budget document also seeks permission from Congress to develop criteria on the "waive of match" provision for states and regions. The administration explains that while states may seek a waiver authority, it does not appear to be the intent of the NEA's authorizing legislation "to allow waiver of match in perpetuity," and guidance is desirable as to the circumstances around the ability of states and regions to seek a waiver of match.

In other changes to the NEA budget allocations, funds for research would increase by almost $1 million over the 2010 levels, and administrative support for salaries and expenses would go up by $1.138 million in the president's budget proposal.

NASAA will continue to provide additional information about the NEA budget proposal as details become available. In the meantime, Congress is enmeshed in trying to resolve funding levels for the 2011 fiscal year, with the House of Representatives this week working on a continuing resolution for the remainder of the current fiscal year with deep cuts totaling almost $100 billion, including a cut in NEA funding back to $145 million for the rest of this fiscal year. Until this year, with the change in political make-up of the House of Representatives and the general concern about reducing spending overall, the NEA's funding had grown by more than 35%, from $124.4 million in 2007 to $167.5 million in 2010.
    [post_title] => President's 2012 Budget Proposes NEA Fund Cut
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => presidents-2012-budget-proposes-nea-fund-cut
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:37:56
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:37:56
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3046
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
President's 2012 Budget Proposes NEA Fund Cut

President's 2012 Budget Proposes NEA Fund Cut
February 14, 2011

President's 2012 Budget Proposes NEA Fund Cut

February 14, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 05:11 President’s 2012 Budget Proposes NEA Fund Cut President Obama sent his fiscal year 2012 budget proposal to Congress today, with a cut in funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) from the 2010 level of $167.5 million to $146.255 million. (Congress still has…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3047
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-02-14 12:17:44
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-02-14 12:17:44
    [post_content] => February 14, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 04:11

UPDATE—Take Action: New House Money Bill Would Cut $22 Million From NEA

Following a revolt last week within the Republican caucus, with a majority of its members refusing to support the plan developed by the House Appropriations Committee to cut some $41 billion in spending for the remainder of the 2011 fiscal year, committee chair Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY) went back to the drawing board and produced a bill reaching the $100 billion in cuts demanded by the budget hawks, with a reduction in funds to the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) from the current level of $167.5 million to $145 million, taking the budget level for the arts agency almost back to its funding in 2008. A similar cut was proposed for the National Endowment for the Humanities. The bill is meant to carry government spending through the remainder of FY2011. Federal agencies are operating now under a funding resolution set to expire on March 4.

The new continuing resolution for FY2011 is expected to reach the House floor later this week. NASAA continues to expect that when the measure reaches the House floor, amendments will be offered to cut deeper into arts funding and possibly to eliminate the NEA funding entirely.

Please continue to take action as we urged you to do last week. Contact your representatives in the House today and tomorrow. Urge them to vote against any amendments proposed on the 2011 continuing resolution that make further cuts to funding for the National Endowment for the Arts. Ask them to speak on the House floor in support of the NEA budget, and offer to provide them with talking points about the value of the federal funding to the arts in your state.

You may contact your senators and representatives by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/, or through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. These are the key points to make in your communications with your legislators:
  • Public funding for the arts is a sound investment in states and communities facing tough economic conditions.
  • The arts generate jobs, tax revenues and consumer spending.
  • NEA funds to state arts agencies are even more critical when a depressed economy is straining state budgets.
These NASAA resources can help you make the case: Taking Charge of Change Why Should Government Support the Arts? [post_title] => UPDATE—Take Action: New House Money Bill Would Cut $22 Million From NEA [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => update-take-action-new-house-money-bill-cut-22-million-nea [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:38:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:38:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3047 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
UPDATE—Take Action: New House Money Bill Would Cut $22 Million From NEA

UPDATE—Take Action: New House Money Bill Would Cut $22 Million From NEA
February 14, 2011

UPDATE—Take Action: New House Money Bill Would Cut $22 Million From NEA

February 14, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 04:11 UPDATE—Take Action: New House Money Bill Would Cut $22 Million From NEA Following a revolt last week within the Republican caucus, with a majority of its members refusing to support the plan developed by the House Appropriations Committee to cut some $41 billion in spending for the…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3048
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-02-11 12:17:45
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-02-11 12:17:45
    [post_content] => February 11, 2011
To: State Arts Agency Executive Directors and Chairs
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 03:11

Take Action: House Votes Expected on 2011 Funds;
House Appropriations Committee Struggles with Cuts, Lists NEA

The chair of the House Appropriations Committee, Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY), this week released a plan to cut some $41 billion in spending for the remainder of the 2011 fiscal year—including a swipe at reducing funds for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) from the current level of $167.5 million to $155.3 million, the budget level for the arts agency in 2009. A similar cut was proposed for the National Endowment for the Humanities, included in a partial list of some 70 federal programs set for funding reductions in what is left of the fiscal year as the House begins to draft a final continuing resolution for 2011. The government is operating now under a funding resolution set to expire on March 4.

Congressional leaders hope to have their work completed on this fiscal year's budget by the March due date. However, what was meant to be a smooth operation in the House hit a roadblock when Republican budget hawks made it clear to their party leaders that the proposed cuts were not deep enough. Notable among the opposition are the conservative Republican Study Committee, which last month offered up its budget proposal with elimination of the NEA, and the Republican freshman class, many of whom appear intent on cutting back the size of government through deep spending reductions.

If negotiations within the Republican caucus progress, the final continuing resolution for FY2011 is expected to reach the House floor some time next week. NASAA is anticipating that amendments will be offered to cut into arts funding even more than would be proposed in the bill on the floor, as well as proposals to eliminate the NEA funding entirely. We are working with our advocacy colleagues to identify supporters and defeat any damaging amendments.

Please take action. Contact your representatives in the House by early next week. Urge them to vote against any amendments proposed on the 2011 continuing resolution that make further cuts to funding for the National Endowment for the Arts. Ask them to speak on the House floor in support of the NEA budget, and offer to provide them with talking points about the value of the federal funding to the arts in your state.

You may contact your senators and representatives by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/, or through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121. These are the key points to make in your communications with your legislators:

 
  • Public funding for the arts is a sound investment in states and communities facing tough economic conditions.
  • The arts generate jobs, tax revenues and consumer spending.
  • NEA funds to state arts agencies will enable state support for the arts to continue where a depressed economy has resulted in revenue shortfalls.These NASAA resources can help you make the case: Taking Charge of Change Why Should Government Support the Arts?Please make a special effort to secure the support of those moderate Republicans who have good voting records on arts funding issues in the past. Reach out to these legislators and urge advocates in your state to do the same: Alabama Rep. Robert Aderholt California Rep. Brian Bilbray Rep. Mary Bono Rep. Jerry Lewis Florida Rep. Vern Buchanan Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen Idaho Rep. Michael Simpson Illinois Rep. Judy Biggert Rep. Timothy Johnson Rep. John Shimkus Kentucky Rep. Ed Whitfield Louisiana Rep. Rodney Alexander Michigan Rep. Thaddeus McCotter Rep. Mike Rogers Rep. Fred Upton Missouri Rep. Jo Ann Emerson Montana Rep. Dennis Rehberg Nebraska Rep. Jeff Fortenberry New Jersey Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen Rep. Frank LoBiondo Rep. Christopher Smith Ohio Rep. Steven LaTourette Rep. Patrick Tiberi Rep. Michael Turner Oklahoma Rep. Frank Lucas Oregon Rep. Greg Walden Pennsylvania Rep. Charles Dent Rep. Jim Gerlach Rep. Timothy Murphy Rep. Todd Platts Virginia Rep. Frank Wolf Washington Rep. David Reichert West Virginia Rep. Shelley Moore Capito
  [post_title] => Take Action: House Votes Expected on 2011 Funds; House Appropriations Committee Struggles with Cuts, Lists NEA [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => take-action-house-votes-expected-2011-funds-house-appropriations-committee-struggles-cuts-lists-nea [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:38:16 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:38:16 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3048 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Take Action: House Votes Expected on 2011 Funds; House Appropriations Committee Struggles with Cuts, Lists NEA

Take Action: House Votes Expected on 2011 Funds; House Appropriations Committee Struggles with Cuts, Lists NEA
February 11, 2011

Take Action: House Votes Expected on 2011 Funds; House Appropriations Committee Struggles with Cuts, Lists NEA

February 11, 2011 To: State Arts Agency Executive Directors and Chairs From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 03:11 Take Action: House Votes Expected on 2011 Funds; House Appropriations Committee Struggles with Cuts, Lists NEA The chair of the House Appropriations Committee, Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY), this week released a plan to cut some $41 billion in…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3049
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-01-26 12:17:46
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-01-26 12:17:46
    [post_content] => January 26, 2011
Vol. 02:11
From Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel

House Republican Caucus Group Proposes NEA Elimination

The House Republican Study Committee (RSC), the most fiscally conservative caucus in the House, has laid out a plan for $2.5 trillion in spending cuts over the next decade, mainly by holding 2011 funds at 2008 levels, and then in 2012 through 2021 rolling back all nondefense discretionary spending to 2006 levels, and eliminating spending entirely on more than 100 federal programs. The list includes elimination of funds to the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) Subsidy, Save America's Treasures, Community Development Block Grants and the Department of Education's arts education grants.

The RSC numbers more than 165 Republicans as members, representing a sizable group in the new Republican majority intent on following through on a pledge to reduce spending. Still, enacting the proposal would be next to impossible, given that Senate Democrats have called for more modest spending restraint, and the White House would oppose many of the cuts as well. With the likes of the NEA and CPB on the list, however, the proposal sets the stage for some serious challenges on the House floor this year as spending bills emerge from the Appropriations Committee.

There is no indication that the chair of the House Appropriations Committee, Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY), would back the RSC plan, although he has announced his intention to begin scaling back nonsecurity discretionary spending to fiscal 2008 levels this year, replacing the current stopgap measure with another continuing resolution that would cut spending. Rogers is not a member of the RSC, nor is Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID), who chairs the Interior Appropriations Subcommittee with jurisdiction over the NEA and has been a strong voice in the past for federal arts funding.

The RSC chair, Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH), has drafted the Spending Reduction Act of 2011, embodying the budget cutting plan of the caucus. Many of the programs proposed for elimination have long been on the wish list for budget hawks to cut, such as Title X birth control and family planning grants, the Legal Services Corporation, and funds for the U.S. Agency for International Development. There are also any number of President Obama's initiatives on the list, such as the programs of the National and Community Services Act and the Department of Energy's work on fuel efficient cars.

At NASAA we are working with our champions in the House on both sides of the aisle who will stand up for our position if and when these proposals come to the fore. Be assured that we will keep you informed as events unfold in this session of the new 112th Congress. NASAA offers these resources to help you stay abreast of developments and make the case for public support of the arts:

Taking Charge of Change NEW!
Current Congressional News and Federal Legislative Updates
Advocacy Tools
Advocacy Services
    [post_title] => House Republican Caucus Group Proposes NEA Elimination
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => house-republican-caucus-group-proposes-nea-elimination
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:38:24
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:38:24
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3049
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => legislative_update
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)
House Republican Caucus Group Proposes NEA Elimination

House Republican Caucus Group Proposes NEA Elimination
January 26, 2011

House Republican Caucus Group Proposes NEA Elimination

January 26, 2011 Vol. 02:11 From Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel House Republican Caucus Group Proposes NEA Elimination The House Republican Study Committee (RSC), the most fiscally conservative caucus in the House, has laid out a plan for $2.5 trillion in spending cuts over the next decade, mainly by holding 2011 funds at 2008 levels, and…

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 3050
    [post_author] => 2
    [post_date] => 2011-01-19 12:17:47
    [post_date_gmt] => 2011-01-19 12:17:47
    [post_content] => January 19, 2011
From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel
Vol. 01:11

Take Action: Contact Your New Legislators in Congress
Urge Support for Federal Arts Funding

A new session of Congress begins this month, with dramatic changes in leadership and political control. Divided government has returned, and if either party is to succeed in the year ahead, Republicans and Democrats must work together, particularly across Capitol Hill from the House to the Senate.

Contact your legislators. With more than 100 new legislators taking seats in the Senate and the House, new faces on Capitol Hill mean many new senators and representatives unfamiliar with the work of state arts agencies and the role of public funding for the arts. Now is the time to acquaint yourself with those you have not known and reacquaint with those with whom you might have worked in the past. Your legislators need to hear from you—their constituents—about the value of the arts in their communities and the importance of public funding to make the arts available to their constituents.

Spending is the issue. The new 112th Congress has urgent work ahead of it. Issues of budget and spending top the legislative agenda. The current continuing resolution for fiscal year 2011 carries spending for all federal agencies at the 2010 levels until March 4. Before that date, Congress needs to set the final spending levels for the remaining six months of the 2011 fiscal year. In mid-February, President Obama expects to send to Congress his proposed budget for the 2012 fiscal year. Austerity budgeting is the theme, and the outcomes are uncertain.

The new Republican leadership in the House is intent on cutting spending from selected programs. The new chair of the House Appropriations Committee, Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY), intends to set spending reduction targets for each of the 12 appropriations subcommittees to achieve in drafting their money bills for the new fiscal year and the remainder of the current year.

Our advocacy is focused. NASAA and our advocacy colleagues are working together to ensure that key leaders in the House and Senate understand the value of funds appropriated to the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). We are meeting every two weeks (our Cultural Advocacy Group usually meets monthly) in this new political environment to plan our strategy and develop a unified message to Congress. The role of the arts in economic revitalization and job creation is a key component in our message to legislators who are concerned about the employment prospects of their constituents and the economic vitality of their communities. We need your help to carry that message to Capitol Hill.

Your advocacy counts. The effort begins now to shape new legislators into political partners—politicians who believe that the arts are an important public responsibility. Over the next few weeks, please make a point to be in touch with your newly elected legislators, listed here. To develop strong political support for the arts in the legislature, it is essential that our newly elected public officials understand the beneficial work done by public arts agencies.

Use this time to introduce yourself to your senators and representatives in Congress. (The same holds true for your state legislators.) Illustrate the work of your state arts agency with information about how federal funds from the NEA serve the citizens of your state. Make yourself available with helpful information and offer to be of counsel when questions arise about arts funding and federal cultural policy. Nothing focuses the attention of our representatives in Congress more than knowing the concern of their constituents on a particular issue.

You may contact your senators and representatives by e-mail at http://www3.capwiz.com/mygov/dbq/officials/ (see Get Involved at right). Convey these points with examples of the work you do in your state:
  • Public funding for the arts is a sound investment in states and communities facing tough economic conditions.
  • The arts generate jobs, tax revenues and consumer spending.
  • NEA funds to state arts agencies will enable state support for the arts to continue where a depressed economy has resulted in revenue shortfalls.
You may also reach your legislators by phone through the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121; or schedule a visit with your new senators and representatives when they are at home. If you are coming to Washington, set up an appointment to meet with your state's congressional delegation on Capitol Hill. Let me know when you plan to be here and I will be pleased to accompany you on your visit. New members of the U.S. House of Representatives: AL: Rep. Martha Roby (R), Rep. Mo Brooks (R), Rep. Terri Sewell (D) AZ: Rep. Paul Gosar, (R), Rep. Ben Quayle (R), Rep. David Schweikert (R) AR: Rep. Rick Crawford (R), Rep. Tim Griffin (R), Rep. Steve Womack (R) CA: Rep. Jeff Denham (R), Rep. Karen Bass (D) CO: Rep. Scott Tipton (R), Rep. Cory Gardner (R) DE: Rep. John Carney (D) FL: Rep. Steve Southerland (R), Rep. Richard Nugent (R), Rep. Daniel Webster (R), Rep. Dennis Ross (R), Rep. Frederica S. Wilson (D), Rep. Allen West (R), Rep. Sandra Adams (R), Rep. David Rivera (R) GA: Rep. Rob Woodall (R), Rep. Austin Scott (R) HI: Rep. Colleen Hanabusa (D) ID: Rep. Raul Labrador (R) IL: Rep. Joe Walsh (R), Rep. Robert Dold (R), Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R), Rep. Randall M. Hultgren (R), Rep. Robert Schilling (R) IN: Rep. Todd Rokita (R), Rep. Larry Bucshon (R), Rep. Todd Young (R) KS: Rep. Tim Huelskamp (R), Rep. Kevin Yoder (R), Rep. Mike Pompeo (R) LA: Rep. Cedric Richmond (D), Rep. Jeff Landry (R) MD: Rep. Andrew P. Harris (R) MA: Rep. Bill Keating (D) MI: Rep. Dan Benishek (R), Rep. Bill Huizenga (R), Rep. Justin Amash (R), Rep. Tim Walberg (R), Rep. Hansen Clarke (D) MN: Rep. Chip Cravaack (R) MS: Rep. Patrick Alan Nunnelee (R), Rep. Steven Palazzo (R) MO: Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R), Rep. Billy Long (R) NV: Rep. Joseph Heck (R) NH: Rep. Frank Guinta (R), Rep. Charlie Bass (R) NJ: Rep. Jon Runyan (R) NM: Rep. Steve Pearce (R) NY: Rep. Mike Grimm (R), Rep. Nan Hayworth (R), Rep. Christopher Gibson (R), Rep. Richard Hanna (R), Rep. Ann Marie Buerkle (R) NC: Rep. Renee Ellmers (R) ND: Rep. Rick Berg (R) OH: Rep. Steven Chabot (R), Rep. Bill Johnson (R), Rep. Steve Stivers (R), Rep. Jim Renacci (R), Rep. Bob Gibbs (R) OK: Rep. James Lankford (R) PA: Rep. Mike Kelly (R), Rep. Patrick Meehan (R), Rep. Michael Fitzpatrick (R), Rep. Thomas Marino (R), Rep. Louis Barletta (R) RI: Rep. David Cicilline (D) SC: Rep. Tim Scott (R), Rep. Jeff Duncan (R), Rep. Trey Gowdy (R), Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R) SD: Rep. Kristi Noem (R) TN: Rep. Chuck Fleischmann (R), Rep. Scott DesJarlais (R), Rep. Diane Black (R), Rep. Stephen Fincher (R) TX: Rep. Bill Flores (R), Rep. Francisco Canseco (R), Rep. Blake Farenthold (R) VA: Rep. Scott E. Rigell (R), Rep. Robert Hurt (R), Rep. Morgan H. Griffith (R) WA: Rep. Jamie Herrera (R) WV: Rep. David McKinley (R) WI: Rep. Sean Duffy (R), Rep. Reid Ribble (R) New members of the U.S. Senate: AR: Sen. John Boozman (R) CT: Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D) FL: Sen. Marco Rubio (R) IN: Sen. Dan Coats (R) KY: Sen. Rand Paul (R) MO: Sen. Roy Blunt (R) NH: Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R) ND: Sen. John Hoeven (R) OH: Sen. Rob Portman (R) PA: Sen. Pat Toomey (R) UT: Sen. Michael Lee (R) WI: Sen. Ron Johnson (R) [post_title] => Take Action: Contact Your New Legislators in Congress; Urge Support for Federal Arts Funding [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => take-action-contact-new-legislators-congress-urge-support-federal-arts-funding [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-19 12:38:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-19 12:38:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://nasaa.topshelfdesign.net/?post_type=legislative_update&p=3050 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => legislative_update [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Take Action: Contact Your New Legislators in Congress; Urge Support for Federal Arts Funding

Take Action: Contact Your New Legislators in Congress; Urge Support for Federal Arts Funding
January 19, 2011

Take Action: Contact Your New Legislators in Congress; Urge Support for Federal Arts Funding

January 19, 2011 From: Thomas L. Birch, Legislative Counsel Vol. 01:11 Take Action: Contact Your New Legislators in Congress Urge Support for Federal Arts Funding A new session of Congress begins this month, with dramatic changes in leadership and political control. Divided government has returned, and if either party is to succeed in the year ahead,…